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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2024

Noam Lapidot-Lefler and Roni Israeli

Recently, the pace of pedagogical change in the field of social-emotional learning (SEL) has increased worldwide; hence, there is a greater need to understand and promote…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the pace of pedagogical change in the field of social-emotional learning (SEL) has increased worldwide; hence, there is a greater need to understand and promote social-emotional elements in education systems. The purpose of this study was to explore the implementation of SEL content and practices in the curricula of teacher-education courses while being mindful of the principles underlying teacher–student relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative methodology, data were collected from 55 students enrolled in three courses taught at a college in Israel. The participants wrote reflections on their SEL experiences, which were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The students’ responses revealed various practices and themes that significantly affected their personal and professional development, among them, the relationships in the classroom, both among the preservice students themselves and between them and the teaching staff. The participants also noted that the SEL components of the course influenced the quality of learning and the development of a professional identity that is actively attuned to elements of SEL.

Research limitations/implications

By introducing SEL early in the preservice stage, preservice teachers learn to create safe and supportive environments for their future students, thus improving students’ academic achievements, behavior and well-being.

Originality/value

The study underscores the importance of embedding SEL in the teacher-education curricula and its influence on both preservice teachers’ learning experience and the formulation of their image as future teachers while highlighting the significant role of teacher–student relationships in promoting healthy personal and professional development.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2016

Nicholas Munn

How we should behave online is an issue that is deceptively complex. The online community, whether in a professional or a personal context, is much broader than the communities in…

Abstract

How we should behave online is an issue that is deceptively complex. The online community, whether in a professional or a personal context, is much broader than the communities in which all but the youngest of us grew up. As such, the standards of propriety in this space can differ, in ways unexpected and dramatic, from those we are used to. In this chapter I ask whether and when we are under an obligation to conform to the expectations of the dominant groups within the online communities we participate in, and argue that there are at least some times when it is defensible to conform to one’s own local norms and expectations rather than subordinating these to the broader online community.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Applied and Professional Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-443-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2009

Shulamit Almog

The chapter contends that although Israeli reality is replete with legal issues, very few films deal directly with the law or with a legal process as a central theme. Contemporary…

Abstract

The chapter contends that although Israeli reality is replete with legal issues, very few films deal directly with the law or with a legal process as a central theme. Contemporary Israeli films are not very different from the early Israeli films in their embracement of a national heroic narrative, which typically leaves very little space for legal issues. The chapter demonstrates the absence of law from Israeli cinema by looking closely at war films, which are probably the most popular and influential Israeli films. War films reflect and in the same time participate in the construction of the Israeli collective consciousness, wherein the army experience is central. Tracing the way in which law is presented (or lacks representation) in them may shed light from a new angle on the role of law in shaping social and political norms in Israel.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-696-0

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Denis Primakov

The status of government’s legal adviser in Israel is complicated and controversial. This status deeply impacts discretion and independence, especially in the role of combating…

Abstract

Purpose

The status of government’s legal adviser in Israel is complicated and controversial. This status deeply impacts discretion and independence, especially in the role of combating corruption. This article aims to review the status, power and independence of the government’s legal adviser and his/her interaction with other legal institutions dealing with corruption cases.

Design/methodology/approach

The author argues that the period of the 1980s, in Israel, was characterized by prosecution’s activism because of the dramatically increased number of corruption-related cases.

Findings

Prominent government legal advisers formulated approaches to the struggle against political corruption in Israel; upon becoming justices of the supreme court, they successfully transited their prosecution mindset to judicial activism (and not only for corruption-related cases).

Originality/value

This article discovers a linkage between prosecution and judicial positions, not under the Israeli legislation but based on personal willingness to combat corruption.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Nira Danziger and Rony Valency

The purpose of this paper is to examine the career anchor concept developed by Edgar Schein.

3766

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the career anchor concept developed by Edgar Schein.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on the distribution of the eight career anchors, on a large heterogeneous sample and the differences in the distribution by gender and type of employment; and the impact of the congruence on job satisfaction between a person's career anchor and his job setting. The sample consists of 1,847 Israeli men and women who completed Schein's Career Anchor Inventory questionnaire. They also provided biographical data and indicated their level of job satisfaction. A new measure is developed and validated to assess the congruence between a person's career anchor and his job.

Findings

The most prevalent career anchor in the sample is lifestyle with the technical/functional anchor, second. Major differences were found between the self‐employed and salaried workers in four anchors. Significant differences between men and women are found in all but two career anchors: technical/functional and security. Finally, the study supports the hypothesis that congruence between a person's job and his career anchor has a positive impact on his job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study furthers existing research on career anchors by using a large heterogeneous sample and offering a new measure of “congruence” between a person's job and his career anchor.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Benny Nuriely, Moti Gigi and Yuval Gozansky

This paper aims to analyze the ways socio-economic issues are represented in mainstream news media and how it is consumed, understood and interpreted by Israeli young adults…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the ways socio-economic issues are represented in mainstream news media and how it is consumed, understood and interpreted by Israeli young adults (YAs). It examines how mainstream media uses neo-liberal discourse, and the ways YAs internalize this ethic, while simultaneously finding ways to overcome its limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed methods study. First, it undertook content analysis of the most popular Israeli mainstream news media among YAs: the online news site Ynet and the TV Channel 2 news. Second, the authors undertook semi-structured in-depth interviews with 29 Israeli YAs. The analysis is based on an online survey of 600 young Israelis, aged 18–35 years.

Findings

Most YAs did not perceive mainstream media as enabling a reliable understanding of the issues important to them. The content analysis revealed that self-representation of YAs is rare, and that their issues were explained, and even resolved, by older adults. Furthermore, most of YAs' problems in mainstream news media were presented using a neo-liberal perspective. Finally, from the interviews, the authors learned that YAs did not find information that could help them deal with their most pressing economic and social issue, in the content offered by mainstream media. For most of them, social media overcomes these shortcomings.

Originality/value

Contrary to research that has explored YAs’ consumerism of new media outlets, this article explores how YAs in Israel are constructed in the media, as well as the way in which YAs understand mainstream and new social media coverage of the issues most important to them. Using media content analysis and interviews, the authors found that Young Adults tend to be ambivalent toward media coverage. They understand the lack of media information: most of them know that they do not learn enough from the media. This acknowledgment accompanies their tendency to internalize the neo-liberal logic and conservative Israeli national culture, in which class and economic redistribution are largely overlooked. Mainstream news media uses neo-liberal discourse, and young adults internalize this logic, while simultaneously finding ways to overcome the limitations this discourse offers. They do so by turning to social media, mainly Facebook. Consequently, their behavior maintains the logic of the market, while also developing new social relations, enabled by social media.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2024

Eran Itskovich, Or Tal Baron, Roni Factor and Simon Perry

Previous research has shown that terror attacks affect a variety of outcomes. However, one outcome that has remained relatively neglected is crime. In the current study we examine…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has shown that terror attacks affect a variety of outcomes. However, one outcome that has remained relatively neglected is crime. In the current study we examine the immediate effect of terrorism on crime, and discuss several behavioral mechanisms that might explain this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

We use data from 190 Israeli localities over 12 years (1999–2011). Applying a fixed-effects Poisson regression model, we assess the effect of terror attacks on recorded crimes of three types – property, domestic violence, and fraud – on the days following the attack. We also examine whether the effect is conditioned on geographical proximity to the attack.

Findings

We find the occurrence of terror attacks has a significant and negative effect on recorded cases of the three crime types. This effect grows stronger as geographical proximity to the attack increases.

Originality/value

Our results suggest that terrorism has an immediate negative effect on crime. This effect might be explained by changes in the behavior of police officers, offenders, and citizens.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2023

Inas Saleh Said and Vijay Vyas

The objective of this study is to understand how Arab entrepreneurs in Israel redress the disadvantage of the intersectionality of place and race by setting up their businesses in…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to understand how Arab entrepreneurs in Israel redress the disadvantage of the intersectionality of place and race by setting up their businesses in markets beyond their ethnic enclaves as well as by pursuing opportunity entrepreneurship and the role human values play in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the portrait value questionnaire, a survey of Arab entrepreneurs in Israel was conducted. Multiple linear regressions were run to generate the findings.

Findings

The authors find that educated and non-conforming Arab men in Israel, driven by stimulation and universalism, successfully neutralise the intersectional disadvantage of place and race through entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

Care is advised in the generalisation of findings of this research to other intersectional communities as they emerge from the unique context of Arab entrepreneurs in Israel.

Practical implications

Education, stimulation and universalism facilitate entrepreneurial success beyond Arab ethnic enclaves whereas conformity suppresses it.

Social implications

With the right attributes and values, marginalised individuals can emerge from the disadvantage of the intersectionality of place and race.

Originality/value

The study advances the intersectionality discourse from “what it is” and “what it does” to “what can be done about it”. It identifies the attributes and values that help Arab entrepreneurs in Israel to remedy their intersectional disadvantage.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Take-off of Israeli High-Tech Entrepreneurship During the 1990s
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08045-099-5

Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2006

Gad Yair and Orit Gazit

Studies of families and inequality in education have focused on the family as a preparatory institution for school. However, researchers have ignored the dynamic process of…

Abstract

Studies of families and inequality in education have focused on the family as a preparatory institution for school. However, researchers have ignored the dynamic process of engaging with academic learning at home on a daily basis and minimized the importance of homework and instruction in this setting. Home observations of Ethiopian families who immigrated to Israel are used here as a case to describe three distracting factors which alienate children from learning at home in lower-class, poor immigrant households: deprived physical settings, sensory bombardment, and emotional stress. By looking at learning at home, this study points at root causes of alienation from learning and thereby adds another perspective on reproduction in education. Our study casts doubt on the ability of home intervention programs to curb social inequalities in education.

Details

Children's Lives and Schooling across Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-400-3

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