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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Stanley F. Stasch and Ronald T. Lonsdale

According to most textbooks, the widely accepted Booz, Allen and Hamilton (BAH) conceptual framework is supposedly the best way to go through the new product development…

Abstract

According to most textbooks, the widely accepted Booz, Allen and Hamilton (BAH) conceptual framework is supposedly the best way to go through the new product development process. That is, the textbooks imply that companies will achieve the best results if they follow the BAH conceptual framework. The authors studied ten new products to identify how marketing research was utilized during their development and introduction. The actual “practice” of marketing research usage was then compared with the BAH framework. The comparison showed that marketing research usage in practice was noticeably different from the usage implied by the BAH conceptual framework, thus suggesting that the latter does not hold up perfectly. The authors offer some suggestions as to when the conceptual framework for marketing research usage should be modified, and what the nature of those modifications might be.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Stanley F. Stasch, Ronald T. Lonsdale and Noel M. LaVenka

Describes a study reviewing recent histories of new product ideasin order to devise a framework of their sources. Proposes aclassification of sources for new product ideas…

Abstract

Describes a study reviewing recent histories of new product ideas in order to devise a framework of their sources. Proposes a classification of sources for new product ideas through laboratory, management, company situation, distribution, supplier, consumer, marketplace, foreign products, and government regulations. Surmises that successful innovation requires an understanding of the sources of new ideas, and that the proposed framework is more effective than other paradigms.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Frank G. Bingham and Charles J. Quigley

Proposes a new product implementation process which is designed toreduce the risk inherent in new product introductions in consumermarkets. Defines the stages of this…

Abstract

Proposes a new product implementation process which is designed to reduce the risk inherent in new product introductions in consumer markets. Defines the stages of this process as idea generation, idea screening, conceptual development and testing, business analysis, product development, test market, and product introduction. Concludes that this process differs from previous models in suggesting a team be created to manage the development, speeding up the tasks in each stage.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Abstract

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Designing winning products
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-682-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Ronald E. Goldsmith

This article reports the findings from a survey on wine use and related consumer characteristics from 271 adult US consumers. A valid and reliable self‐report scale was…

Abstract

This article reports the findings from a survey on wine use and related consumer characteristics from 271 adult US consumers. A valid and reliable self‐report scale was used to measure wine innovativeness. Multi‐item scales also measured level of wine consumption, wine involvement, opinion leadership for wine, and real and subjective wine knowledge. As hypothesised, wine innovators reported using more wine than non‐innovators. They were also found to score higher on measures of wine involvement, wine opinion leadership, and subjective wine knowledge than those consumers less likely to be wine innovators. This pattern of characteristics is similar to that found for innovative consumers of other product fields and provides insights into the characteristics of wine innovators that marketers can use to develop better strategies for innovative wine products.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1974

Smedleys Ltd v. Breed effectively disposes of Section 3 (3), Food and Drugs Act, 1955 as a defence in law in what nowadays constitutes the commonest source of all food…

Abstract

Smedleys Ltd v. Breed effectively disposes of Section 3 (3), Food and Drugs Act, 1955 as a defence in law in what nowadays constitutes the commonest source of all food prosecutions, viz., foreign matter in food. Their Lord‐ships' judgment is indeed a brilliant exposition of the law on the subject, but the result of their dismissal of the appeal can only be seen, as one of their number stated, that local authorities and magistrates for all practical purposes can ignore the subsection, and from the numerous reports of legal proceedings, this is what they have been doing for many years. It was resurrected in a case, similar in circumstance to that in Smedleys, a couple of years ago, in respect of a snail in black currant jam, in which the snail and black currants were identical in size and appearance.

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British Food Journal, vol. 76 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1951

Under the Defence (Sale of Food) Regulations, 1943, the Minister of Food has powers to regulate the composition of foods, to control the labelling of them, and, in some…

Abstract

Under the Defence (Sale of Food) Regulations, 1943, the Minister of Food has powers to regulate the composition of foods, to control the labelling of them, and, in some measure, the advertising matter, in order to protect the consumer against the sale of inferior products and against misleading claims. Enforcement is in the hands of local Food and Drugs Authorities.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 53 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1982

Legal process by its very nature cannot be swift; step by step, it must be steady and sure and this takes time. There is no room for hasty decisions for these would tend…

Abstract

Legal process by its very nature cannot be swift; step by step, it must be steady and sure and this takes time. There is no room for hasty decisions for these would tend to defeat its purpose. Time, however, is of the essence and this is set for various aspects of legal action by limitation of actions legislation, which sets periods after which the case is no longer actionable. The periods are adequate and in civil law, generous to avoid injustice being done. The one serious complaint against the process of law, however, is the unwarrantable delays which are possible despite limitation. From the far‐off days of Equity, when Dickens' Jarndyce v Jarndyce, caricatured and exaggerated as it was, described the scene down to the present when delays, often spoken of in Court as outrageous are encountered, to say nothing of the crowded lists in the High Courts and Crown Courts; the result of the state of society and not the fault of the judiciary. Early in 1980, it was reported that 14,500 cases were awaiting trial in the Southeastern Circuit Crown Court alone. Outside the Courts legal work hangs on, to the annoyance of those concerned; from house purchase to probate. Here, the solicitor is very much his own master, unhampered by statutory time limits and the only recourse a client has is to change this solicitor, with no certainty that there will be any improvement, or appeal to the Law Society.

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British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Chris Lonsdale and Andrew Cox

Notes that outsourcing is just one of the means by which the boundary of the firm can be adjusted. Considers various other means such as conglomeration and horizontal and…

Abstract

Notes that outsourcing is just one of the means by which the boundary of the firm can be adjusted. Considers various other means such as conglomeration and horizontal and vertical integration. Focuses on outsourcing and its place in this bigger picture and discusses the history of outsourcing. Outlines concerns for managers and gives case examples from Rank Zerox and BP.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 100 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1913

Well‐founded complaint has recently been made concerning the characters of the various forms of “candy,” or, as we should term them, “sweets,” that are manufactured in…

Abstract

Well‐founded complaint has recently been made concerning the characters of the various forms of “candy,” or, as we should term them, “sweets,” that are manufactured in great quantities in the United States.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 15 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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