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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Henry Adobor and Ronald S. McMullen

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework on resilience types in supply chain networks.

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1741

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework on resilience types in supply chain networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a complex adaptive systems perspective as an organizing framework, the paper explores three forms of resilience: engineering, ecological and evolutionary and their antecedents and links these to four phases of supply chain resilience (SCRES): readiness, response, recovery, growth and renewal.

Findings

Resilient supply chains need all three forms of resilience. Efficiency and system optimization approaches may promote quick recovery after a disruption. However, system-level response requires adaptive capabilities and transformational behaviors may be needed to move supply chains to new fitness levels after a disruption. The three resilience types discussed are not mutually exclusive, but rather complement each other and there are synergies and tradeoffs among these resilience types.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical validation of the theoretical propositions will open up new vistas for supply chain research. Possibilities exist for analyzing and assessing SCRES in multiple and more comprehensive ways.

Practical implications

The findings of the research can help managers refine their approaches to managing supply chain networks. A more balanced approach to supply chain management can reduce the risks and vulnerabilities associated with supply chain disruptions.

Originality/value

This study is unique as it conceptualizes SCRES in multiple ways, thereby extending our understanding of supply chain stability.

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Ronald S. McMullen and Henry Adobor

The purpose of this research is to examine leadership in an intermediary organization whose mission is to facilitate collaboration between large corporations and their…

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3658

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine leadership in an intermediary organization whose mission is to facilitate collaboration between large corporations and their smaller suppliers, a bridging organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using a single case revelatory method was adopted. Data were collected from a bridge leader as well as 20 executives of companies involved in the collaboration.

Findings

The analysis revealed that the successful bridge leader tended: to build personal relations and goodwill as a way of creating personal obligations on the part of the stakeholders he led; championed the cause of the stakeholders and made their mission his/her own; created opportunities for individual and collective goal achievement; relied on symbolic behavior and ceremonies to reify the bridge mission; and engaged in frequent communication with a liberal use of humor and playfulness to make goals embraceable by the stakeholders in the collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study and that limits the generalization of these findings. However, the findings provide some preliminary evidence to show that a lack of control of resources need not be a reason for leader non‐performance.

Practical implications

A bridge leader may substitute other influence strategies to compensate for the lack of direct positional power.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few that explicitly examines leadership in bridging organizations. The paper's understanding of this phenomenon is important because of the importance of bridging organizations to business and social innovation.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Greater resilience at individual, group and organizational levels better positions firms to counter threats to supply chain efficiency posed by sudden crisis or…

Abstract

Findings

Greater resilience at individual, group and organizational levels better positions firms to counter threats to supply chain efficiency posed by sudden crisis or disruption. Focusing on engineering, ecological and evolutionary resilience types can help strengthen overall resilience by countering deficiencies within each form and exploiting potential synergies.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2012

J. Robert Mitchell, Ronald K. Mitchell, Benjamin T. Mitchell and Sharon Alvarez

In this study we focus on how conditions of uncertainty shape the entrepreneurial action that underlies opportunity creation. We utilize the basic structure of economic…

Abstract

In this study we focus on how conditions of uncertainty shape the entrepreneurial action that underlies opportunity creation. We utilize the basic structure of economic exchange in the context of opportunity creation theory to further investigate the conditions under which an entrepreneur might be expected to act to bring an opportunity into existence. Specifically, we suggest that uncertainty, that is manifest as relational uncertainty and resource uncertainty, shapes the entrepreneurial actions that underlie the creation of opportunities. In a laboratory experiment we test this hypothesis by observing 56 three-person groups engaged in an opportunity creation-focused exchange task. The results of the experiment support the hypothesis that variability in the conditions of uncertainty (relational uncertainty and resource uncertainty) affects the entrepreneurial action that results in opportunity creation. These results lead us then to propose that there exists a theoretically specifiable set of key entrepreneurial actions (one that is others-focused and another that is works-focused). From this analysis we suggest potential directions for future research in the areas of entrepreneurial action and opportunity creation.

Details

Entrepreneurial Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-901-1

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Jeff Stambaugh, G. T. Lumpkin, Ronald K. Mitchell, Keith Brigham and Claudia Cogliser

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a conceptualization of competitive aggressiveness (CA), a dimension of entrepreneurial orientation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a conceptualization of competitive aggressiveness (CA), a dimension of entrepreneurial orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and hierarchical regression are employed on responses from 182 banks in the southwestern US Performance data on the banks are drawn from the US Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's (FDIC's) Call reports.

Findings

The results indicate awareness, motivation and capability are antecedents of CA, which itself is positively related to increased market share and, in more dense markets, profitability.

Practical implications

Aggressive firms exhibit certain routines that can lead to competitive actions, which assists performance in some contexts. Managers who wish to increase (or decrease) their firms' overall competitive posture can encourage (or discourage) employees from performing competitive routines such as monitoring their rivals or talking about their rivals' strategies.

Originality/value

By developing CA' conceptualization, the study advances the understanding of the antecedents of competitive behavior and makes it easier to study competition in smaller firms.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Judith Overmier and Rhonda Harris Taylor

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides…

Abstract

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides strategies and identifies resources that can facilitate such collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Ali C. Akyol

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

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Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Ronald K. Mitchell

Most of us believe that entrepreneurs are special. We do this because both scholars and practitioners tell us so.

Abstract

Most of us believe that entrepreneurs are special. We do this because both scholars and practitioners tell us so.

Details

International Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-227-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

Over the years we have reported prosecutions where the defence has alleged, and with circumstantial support that the presence of a harmful foreign body in food was…

Abstract

Over the years we have reported prosecutions where the defence has alleged, and with circumstantial support that the presence of a harmful foreign body in food was deliberate through the action of a single disgruntled employee or where the labour relations climate generally has been bad. It makes no difference to the manufacturer's responsibility—the offence is an absolute one—but occasionally courts have allowed it in mitigation. Sometimes, it has been the nature of the extraneous material, e.g. fragments of glass or metal, the like of which did not exist in the factory premises or plant. This may be taken as a symptom of the vandalism of the age, but more recently, two incidents have drawn attention to its dangers and provided a glimpse of the criminal mind which can inflict such injury on employers, and expose innocent consumers, of all ages, to possible harm.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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