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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Surendra M. Gupta, Yousef A.Y. Al‐Turki and Ronald F. Perry

Just‐in‐time (JIT) systems were originally designed for deterministic production environments such as constant processing times and smooth and stable demand. However, once…

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6767

Abstract

Just‐in‐time (JIT) systems were originally designed for deterministic production environments such as constant processing times and smooth and stable demand. However, once implemented, JIT is fraught with numerous types of uncertainties, including variations in processing time and demand, planned interruptions such as preventive maintenance and unplanned interruptions such as equipment failure. These uncertainties lead to lowered production throughput, decreased machine utilization, increased order completion time and greater backlogs and overtime requirements. In this paper, we introduce a newly developed system, which we refer to as the flexible kanban system (FKS), to cope with uncertainties and planned/unplanned interruptions. We demonstrate the superiority of the new system by considering four case examples covering various uncertainties, conducting numerous studies and comparing the overall performances of the FKS with that of the traditional JIT system. In all the cases considered, the performance of the FKS was, indeed, superior to that of the traditional JIT system.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

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11436

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

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Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Kristin L. Cullen-Lester, Caitlin M. Porter, Hayley M. Trainer, Pol Solanelles and Dorothy R. Carter

The field of Human Resource Management (HRM) has long recognized the importance of interpersonal influence for employee and organizational effectiveness. HRM research and…

Abstract

The field of Human Resource Management (HRM) has long recognized the importance of interpersonal influence for employee and organizational effectiveness. HRM research and practice have focused primarily on individuals’ characteristics and behaviors as a means to understand “who” is influential in organizations, with substantially less attention paid to social networks. To reinvigorate a focus on network structures to explain interpersonal influence, the authors present a comprehensive account of how network structures enable and constrain influence within organizations. The authors begin by describing how power and status, two key determinants of individual influence in organizations, operate through different mechanisms, and delineate a range of network positions that yield power, reflect status, and/or capture realized influence. Then, the authors extend initial structural views of influence beyond the positions of individuals to consider how network structures within and between groups – capturing group social capital and/or shared leadership – enable and constrain groups’ ability to influence group members, other groups, and the broader organizational system. The authors also discuss how HRM may leverage these insights to facilitate interpersonal influence in ways that support individual, group, and organizational effectiveness.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-430-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Danny M. Peterson and Ronald W. Perry

There is a prevailing assumption in the research literature that disaster exercises produce a wide variety of benefits that promote effective emergency management…

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2224

Abstract

There is a prevailing assumption in the research literature that disaster exercises produce a wide variety of benefits that promote effective emergency management. Unfortunately, there are few studies available that confirm this assumption. This paper reviews the role of exercises in disaster management and places them within the context of preparedness activities. Within this context, the links among planning, training and exercising are explicated. The potential benefits of exercises are reviewed and hypotheses generated that link exercise experiences with emergency responders’ perceptions of planning adequacy, training adequacy, teamwork, response network effectiveness, equipment adequacy and job risk. The effects of two exercises – one dealing with hazardous materials and one with medical mass casualties – are examined using a quasi‐experimental research design. The subjects were professional firefighters. Results indicated that successful exercises can enhance perceptions of teamwork, training adequacy, response network effectiveness, job risk, and equipment adequacy. The link between exercise participation and perception of planning adequacy was found to be equivocal.

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or characteristics such as age, race, religion, ethnicity or professional designations, for the purpose of exploiting the trust factor for financial advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that these fraud offenders rely on a myriad of persuasion techniques to overcome offender skepticism coupled with victims engaging in a psychological concept known as projection bias to evaluate the credibility of these offenders. These factors create a negative synergy that dilutes the perceived need for due diligence normally required prior to engaging in securities transactions. In addition, these offenders display a predatory quality, debunking the myth that fraud offenders exhibit a homogenous crime group behavioral profile.

Practical implications

Social institutions that include both for profit and not for profit should consider evaluating their interactions with those who share similar characteristics and affiliations that attempt to offer goods or services by considering some of the factors contained within this article that may dilute due diligence protocol.

Originality/value

This paper serves to alert and educate anti‐fraud professionals, law enforcement and policy makers of a predatory fraud practice that targets organizations exploiting the inherent trust that these organizations rely upon.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or characteristics such as age, race, religion, ethnicity or professional designations, for the purpose of exploiting the trust factor for financial advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that these fraud offenders rely on myriad persuasion techniques to overcome offender skepticism coupled with victims engaging in a psychological concept known as projection bias to evaluate the credibility of these offenders. These factors create a negative synergy that dilutes the perceived need for due diligence normally required prior to engaging in securities transactions. In addition, these offenders display a predatory quality. debunking the myth that fraud offenders exhibit a homogenous crime group behavioral profile.

Practical implications

Social institutions that include both for profit and not for profit should consider evaluating their interactions with those who share similar characteristics and affiliations that attempt to offer goods or services by considering some of the factors contained within this paper that may dilute due diligence protocol.

Originality/value

This paper serves to alert and educate anti‐fraud professionals, law enforcement and policy makers of a predatory fraud practice that targets organizations exploiting the inherent trust upon which these organizations rely.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Jill O. Jasperson, Thomas E. Dearden and Ronald Mellado Miller

In 2015, Utah enacted the first white-collar crime (WCC) registry. Similar to sex offender registries, this registry provides demographic information to the public. Utah’s…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2015, Utah enacted the first white-collar crime (WCC) registry. Similar to sex offender registries, this registry provides demographic information to the public. Utah’s law includes convicted offenders of second-degree felonies for a variety of non-violent, financial crimes, including securities fraud, insurance fraud and theft by deception (H.B. 378, 2015). The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of this new registry.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was built in 2016 to better understand the perceptions of said WCC registry. This paper considers the relationships between demographic variables, fear of crime and support for Utah’s WCC registry using data from over 968 university students in Utah.

Findings

The authors find strong support for the registry, with 76% of the sample supporting its implementation. Only one variable, social political affiliation, was significant. Those who defined themselves as social strong liberals were more likely to select somewhat support rather than definitely support the registry.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that we know of to examine support for a WCC registry.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Abstract

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The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Joan Berman

This index accompanies the index that appeared in Reference Services Review 16:4 (1988). As noted in the introduction to that index, the articles in RSR that deal with…

Abstract

This index accompanies the index that appeared in Reference Services Review 16:4 (1988). As noted in the introduction to that index, the articles in RSR that deal with specific reference titles can be grouped into two categories: those that review specific titles (to a maximum of three) and those that review titles pertinent to a specific subject or discipline. The index in RSR 16:4 covered the first category; it indexed, by title, all titles that had been reviewed in the “Reference Serials” and the “Landmarks of Reference” columns, as well as selected titles from the “Indexes and Indexers,” “Government Publications,” and “Special Feature” columns of the journal.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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