Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Ronald Drozdenko and Marlene Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of country stereotyping, bad press, and consumer ethnocentrism on the prices a country can command and be competitive.

3399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of country stereotyping, bad press, and consumer ethnocentrism on the prices a country can command and be competitive.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 767 consumers were given prices for products in 11 different categories, then told each product was made in China. They were then asked how much more (if anything) they would be willing to pay if the product was made in Germany, the USA, or India.

Findings

Price premiums were significant for all categories, and increased for those scoring higher on a Consumer Ethnocentric Tendencies Scale (CET Scale). However, completing the CET Scale before answering price questions caused respondents to have a lower price premium for US products. The size of the price premium was also positively correlated with the amount of exposure to negative news concerning Chinese products.

Research limitations/implications

It is unknown how consumers would respond to categories not studied.

Practical implications

The cost of setting up government controls and industry oversight is expensive. However, the cost of negative news with product recalls is also expensive. Countries who avoid such negative news may be able to price their products 14 percent to 100 percent higher.

Originality/value

This study quantifies price premiums available to countries with a positive COO image. It also allows a manager to determine the feasibility of developing domestically produced products in specific categories, by identifying categories where consumers would pay a premium for domestically produced products.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ronald Drozdenko and Marlene Jensen

Studies on optimal discount levels have sometimes yielded contradictory results, leaving practitioners with unclear direction. This paper proposes clarifying the optimum…

2308

Abstract

Purpose

Studies on optimal discount levels have sometimes yielded contradictory results, leaving practitioners with unclear direction. This paper proposes clarifying the optimum discount levels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study asked 453 consumers to choose their own optimal discount levels (from 0‐80 percent) for eight product categories across two distribution channels (physical store and online merchant). Then they were asked if the reason if they did not always select the deepest discount.

Findings

Only 13 percent selected the 80 percent discount level for each product and each channel, despite seeing the exact price they would pay at each level. In support of attribution theory, 88 percent of the consumers attributed at least one cause for the deepest discounts. Most frequently cited were concerns about quality problems, damaged goods, or stolen goods. Consumers also opted for lower discount levels from the online merchant than from the physical store. There was a wide divergence by product category, with consumers selecting smaller discounts on tires and cereal and the deepest discounts on shirts.

Research limitations/implications

Given the divergence across product categories, it is unknown how consumers would respond to categories not studied.

Practical implications

This paper has revealed strong consumer perceptions about discount risks and the tradeoffs consumer make between risk and financial benefit across different product categories, both online and off – which can help marketing practitioners in setting discount levels.

Originality/value

By allowing consumers to select their own preferred discount levels, it is shown that most customers attribute some risk to them.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Marlene Jensen and Ronald Drozdenko

This study sets out to investigate the price premium brand‐loyal customers would be willing to pay over expectations in order to remain loyal.

4270

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to investigate the price premium brand‐loyal customers would be willing to pay over expectations in order to remain loyal.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 385 consumers were asked price expectations and brand preferences for ten different products. Non‐brand‐loyal consumers were asked whether they would buy the cheapest brand or the cheapest brand with a name they recognized. Brand‐loyal consumers were asked to imagine they went to buy each product only to discover a higher price than expected. These consumers gave the maximum price they would pay to buy their preferred brands under two conditions – time pressured and not.

Findings

For non‐brand‐loyal consumers, just 14‐43 percent (depending on the product) would buy the cheapest offering, while 57‐86 percent would buy the cheapest brand whose name they recognized. Brand‐loyal consumers would pay a mean of 15.4 percent more than expected (not rushed) or 37.0 percent (rushed). Findings differed by product category with HDTVs garnering just an 8.8 percent price premium (not rushed) and 19.1 percent (rushed), while shirts/blouses showed the highest (21.9 percent not rushed and 53.2 percent rushed).

Research limitations/implications

It is unknown how consumers would respond to categories not studied.

Practical implications

Recognizable brand names are able to attract more buyers than lower‐priced unknown brands, even among “bargain shoppers”. Consumers are willing to pay more to buy preferred brands, and even more in rushed situations.

Originality/value

This study puts a dollar value on consumers' desires to avoid search under time pressure.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2018

Irene M. Gordon and Jamal A. Nazari

This paper aims to examine the impact of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) on the academic business ethics literature with the intent of making this research more…

1002

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) on the academic business ethics literature with the intent of making this research more accessible to those researchers and practitioners working in business ethics and other related fields. Specifically, the authors outline the types and scope of SOX-related research, examine the extent of reliance on SOX, identify which theoretical frameworks and research approaches are used and point out under-researched areas.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a descriptive approach, the authors examine the theoretical perspectives, classifying these perspectives into four groupings (economics, ethics/moral, psychological and sociological). Using counts, categorization and content analyses, the authors provide an overview of 115 articles with further analysis provided for articles relying heavily (n = 14) or moderately (n = 42) on SOX.

Findings

Whistleblowing and codes of ethics are well-researched topics. However, employment of some theories (e.g. signaling theory and stakeholder theory) and qualitative approaches are used less often. Other under-researched issues in the sample include CEO/CFO certifications, cost of compliance, auditor disclosures and empirical investigation of SOX and auditor independence (or corporate culture).

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ decision to use certain databases, search terms and research methods, and to focus on business ethics journals and English language articles are possible limitations.

Originality/value

The authors’ contributions comprise an examination of the scope of SOX topics and detailing how reliant the research is on SOX. The authors identify trends in this literature and provide evidence of the broad theoretical frameworks to better understand the breadth and depth of theories used.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6