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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2018

Thomas Richardson, Mma Yeebo, Megan Jansen, Peter Elliott and Ron Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether financial variables impact psychosis risk over time in students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether financial variables impact psychosis risk over time in students.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 408 first-year British undergraduate students completed measures assessing psychosis risk and finances at three time points.

Findings

Greater financial difficulties increased psychosis risk cross sectionally both in terms of symptoms and distress. Other financial variables such as student loan amount were not significant. In longitudinal analysis financial difficulties increase psychotic symptoms and distress over time, but there was no impact of psychotic symptoms on later financial difficulties.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a relatively small and heavily female sample. Future research is needed to confirm the findings.

Practical implications

Whilst amount of debt does not appear to impact psychotic symptoms in students, greater financial difficulties appear to increase the risk of psychosis over time. Professionals working with students should be aware of this potential link.

Originality/value

This is the first time a longitudinal study has examined the effect of finances on psychosis symptoms.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Thomas Richardson, Peter Elliott and Ron Roberts

Previous cross-sectional research has examined the effect of loneliness on mental health. The purpose of this paper is to examine longitudinal relationships in students.

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Abstract

Purpose

Previous cross-sectional research has examined the effect of loneliness on mental health. The purpose of this paper is to examine longitudinal relationships in students.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 454 British undergraduate students completed measures of loneliness and mental health at four time points.

Findings

After controlling for demographics and baseline mental health, greater loneliness predicted greater anxiety, stress, depression and general mental health over time. There was no evidence that mental health problems increased loneliness over time. There was no relationship with alcohol problems. Baseline loneliness predicted greater eating disorder risk at follow-up and vice versa.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by a relatively small and heavily female sample.

Practical implications

Social and psychological interventions to reduce loneliness in university settings may improve mental health.

Social implications

Universities should consider organising social activities to mitigate feelings of loneliness in students.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature as a longitudinal analysis showing that loneliness exacerbates poor mental health over time. This also adds to the literature for students specifically, and suggests a possible bi-directional relationship between eating disorders and loneliness for the first time.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Davar Rezania, Ron Baker and Andrew Nixon

Despite the importance of accountability for the oversight of projects, few studies have directly examined accountability mechanisms at the project level. While the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the importance of accountability for the oversight of projects, few studies have directly examined accountability mechanisms at the project level. While the literature already provides descriptions of governance and mechanisms of accountability, the purpose of this paper is to examine how project managers view their accountability relationships within their organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is guided by critical realism as a philosophy of science. The authors interviewed 15 project managers from 12 organizations and analyzed the transcripts in the light of existing project management accountability literature.

Findings

The authors observe the practice of socializing accountability through face-to-face negotiation and symmetries of power due to interdependencies happen to some extent in management of projects. This suggests ambidexterity in accountability in project-based organizations. Therefore, the current models of project accountability and governance that are solely based on the agency theory are not sufficient to explain the accountability relationships in such organizations.

Practical implications

Accountability arrangements happen within a system for steering projects. Managers should be aware of how project managers view their accountability and how socializing practices of accountability can help the project’s management and the organization’s management interact in order to transform organizational systems by regulating issues of project concern and defining the process and direction of how project deliverables are produced, introduced, absorbed and used within the organization.

Originality/value

“Theory driven” interviews and analysis are used to confirm or refine conceptualization of accountability in management of projects. Most models of project governance are based on the agency theory or governability theory. The authors have demonstrated that socializing practices of accountability should be included in investigating project governance. The authors observe that project managers are often concerned with the interdependence with their principals and the socializing processes of accountability that arise from this interdependence.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Abstract

Details

Developing Leaders for Positive Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-241-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Jan Michael Alexandre C. Bernadas, Carlos M. Piocos III and Ron Bridget T. Vilog

Informed by health activism (Zoller, 2005), the purpose of this paper is to explore the communicative processes of organizations working with women migrants in countries…

Abstract

Purpose

Informed by health activism (Zoller, 2005), the purpose of this paper is to explore the communicative processes of organizations working with women migrants in countries of destination. In particular, it explored the definitions of and explanations for health of organizations, their solutions to disease and illness, as well as, the methods and tactics they use to communicate health.

Design/methodology/approach

It employed qualitative approach specifically in-depth interviews with leaders or core members of not-for-profit and faith-based organizations working with Filipina migrants in Japan. Field notes from participant observations in formal meetings and informal gatherings were likewise used as data sources.

Findings

While organizations also recognized physical and spiritual health, they placed strong emphasis on mental well-being. Other than translation service, pastoral care, and shelter, coordinating with other not-for-profit and faith-based organizations, international centers, and governments was solution for addressing illness and disease. Together with face-to-face, digital media were used as method and tactic to communicate within and outside organizations. It likewise found that the organizations included were inclusive such that they also worked with other Filipinos in Japan.

Originality/value

This paper contributed to migration health literature by discussing the central role of organizations for mental well-being activism, favorable consequences of coordination among organizations to promote access to quality healthcare and information and dual characterization of digital media for organizing publics. Overall, it is one of the few to explore the ways into which organizations communicatively challenge health structures in countries of destination.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Jamal Shamsie

Most of the resource-based literature has concentrated on the sustainability of advantages rather than on the appropriability of rents that can be derived from these. In…

Abstract

Most of the resource-based literature has concentrated on the sustainability of advantages rather than on the appropriability of rents that can be derived from these. In this paper, we focus on both of these issues by developing a classification of resources based on type of ownership and control. We use the U.S. motion picture industry to assess the degree of sustainable advantages and appropriable rents that can be generated by contracted, owned and embedded resources. We suggest that both sustainability and appropriability is likely to be lowest for contracted resources such as top-rated stars and directors. On the other hand, these are likely to be highest for embedded resources which typically reflect firm-specific knowledge and learning in the development and marketing of various types of film genres.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2017

Ron Sanchez, Jeremy Galbreath and Gavin Nicholson

In this paper we develop a model for researching the influence that a board of directors can have on improving an organization’s sustainability performance. Our model…

Abstract

In this paper we develop a model for researching the influence that a board of directors can have on improving an organization’s sustainability performance. Our model explores sources of cognitive flexibility of boards needed to recognize and respond to the need for improved sustainability performance. We first define concepts of sustainability, sustainability competence, and sustainability performance. We then analyze two forms of board capital (a board’s human capital and its social capital) and three aspects of a board’s information processing (its patterns of information search, discussion and debate, and information absorption) that we suggest affect a board’s cognitive flexibility and thereby influence whether a board decides to adopt sustainability performance goals. Our model also suggests that an organization’s strategic flexibility – as represented by its current endowments of resource flexibilities and coordination flexibilities – will moderate the relationship between a board’s decision to adopt sustainability performance goals and an organization’s subsequent achievement of those goals. We also suggest that our model is generally relevant to any research seeking to predict the influence of boards on strategic change in many forms, not just to research focused on sustainability issues.

Details

Mid-Range Management Theory: Competence Perspectives on Modularity and Dynamic Capabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-404-0

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2017

Abstract

Details

Mastering Business for Strategic Communicators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-503-0

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Abstract

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Mastering Business for Strategic Communicators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-503-0

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Abstract

Details

Business Acumen for Strategic Communicators: A Primer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-662-9

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