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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Ron Lawrence

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to encourage HR departments to establish a formal executive mentoring program in their organizations and to guide them in their…

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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to encourage HR departments to establish a formal executive mentoring program in their organizations and to guide them in their efforts of implementing such a program. Design/methodology/approach – The article provides recommendations on selecting mentors and mentees as well as do's and don'ts for implementing a successful program and measuring its outcomes. Findings – Thoughtfully structured and implemented, a formal executive mentoring program has significant measurable benefits for mentors, mentees and the organization far beyond those that can be achieved with an informal program. The sharing of experience and wisdom that occurs in mentoring is a unique form of development that fosters growth and lets leaders be the best they can be. Practical implications – HR departments should take the lead in establishing a formal executive mentoring program rather than rely on grassroots emergence of “organic relationships.” Mentoring facilitates the process of turning the experiences and knowledge of junior executives into wisdom on the path to senior leadership. Originality/value – A formal mentoring program assures that the experience and expertise of retiring baby‐boomer leaders is used wisely in what little time remains.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Abstract

Details

The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Cheryl Yandell Adkisson and Ron Adkisson

This chapter focuses on the objectives of historical interpretation (particularly teaching objectives outside of the traditional name- and date-driven curriculum), ideas…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the objectives of historical interpretation (particularly teaching objectives outside of the traditional name- and date-driven curriculum), ideas that lead to creating a safe environment for students to be willing to try character portrayal themselves, content typically taught using this strategy, and successfully implemented sample lessons and activities by the authors that effectively utilize and harness the power of historical interpretation. These activities involve intense and intentional skill–based instruction that scaffolds students throughout their coursework, filling the school year with meaningful student-researched and student-produced historical interpretation. The authors discuss their teaching philosophy in relation to history and social studies, explaining why historical interpretation benefits teaching and learning. Through teacher- and student-driven character portrayals, the authors have created vibrant, secure classroom environments where students become responsible for their own learning and enthusiastic about research, writing, and performing. The chapter contains recommendations for coaching students in artifact analysis, performance, historical thinking strategies, storytelling, and creative writing. While they acknowledge that living history is not a “one-size-fits-all” solution to teaching history and social studies, they demonstrate that the unique learning culture that can result, providing student reflections to illustrate that point. The authors include and explain several effective resources that they have developed for student analysis of artifacts/objects, for guiding historical thinking, and for researching and writing. The chapter concludes with suggestions for individual and large group performance activities and advice on how to grade living history projects, keeping learning in mind as a component of holistic grading of creative student products.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Abstract

Details

Enhancing Competences for Competitive Advantage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-877-9

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Ron Wiener

The older generation are often portrayed as being a ‘problem’ for society. This case study describes two theatre projects in which elder participants develop their…

Abstract

The older generation are often portrayed as being a ‘problem’ for society. This case study describes two theatre projects in which elder participants develop their creativity, explore issues to do with the ageing process and confront many of the stereotypes about growing old and then take their efforts out into the wider community.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2016

Kathleen M. Alley and Barbara J. Peterson

To review and synthesize findings from peer-reviewed research related to students’ sources of ideas for writing, and instructional dimensions that affect students…

Abstract

Purpose

To review and synthesize findings from peer-reviewed research related to students’ sources of ideas for writing, and instructional dimensions that affect students’ development of ideas for composition in grades K-8.

Design/methodology/approach

The ideas or content expressed in written composition are considered critical to ratings of writing quality. We utilized a Systematic Mixed Studies Review (SMSR) methodological framework (Heyvaert, Maes, & Onghena, 2011) to explore K-8 students’ ideas and writing from a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

Findings

Students’ ideas for writing originate from a range of sources, including teachers, peers, literature, content area curriculum, autobiographical/life experiences, popular culture/media, drawing, and play. Intertextuality, copying, social dialogue, and playful peer interactions are productive strategies K-8 writers use to generate ideas for composing, in addition to strategies introduced through planned instruction. Relevant dimensions of instruction include motivation to write, idea planning and organization, as well as specific instructional strategies, techniques, and tools to facilitate idea generation and selection within the composition process.

Practical implications

A permeable curriculum and effective instructional practices are crucial to support students’ access to a full range of ideas and knowledge-based resources, and help them translate these into written composition. Instructional practices for idea development and writing: (a) connect reading and writing for authentic purposes; (b) include explicit modeling of strategies for planning and “online” generation of ideas throughout the writing process across genre; (c) align instructional focus across reading, writing, and other curricular activities; (d) allow for extended time to write; and (e) incorporate varied, flexible participation structures through which students can share ideas and receive teacher/peer feedback on writing.

Details

Writing Instruction to Support Literacy Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-525-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Ron G. Christian, Samer N. Sarofim, Brian S. Gordon and Piotr S. Bobkowski

The purpose of this paper is to examine how exposure to a cause-related marketing (CRM) initiative involving sport teams affects attitude formation for the team and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how exposure to a cause-related marketing (CRM) initiative involving sport teams affects attitude formation for the team and its amplification of purchase intention for team-branded merchandise. Specifically, this paper assessed the role of distinct measures (warmth, brand attitude, admiration and success) on purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized model was tested using a 2 (promotion: CRM vs non-CRM) × 2 (team: successful vs unsuccessful) between-subjects design. Following MANCOVA analysis, the moderating effect of success was explored within the sequential moderated mediation model where perceived warmth and brand attitude explicated the effect of CRM exposure on purchase intention.

Findings

The results of this paper suggest that a “Warmth Effect” played a prominent role in shaping consumer perception for sports teams when partnered with a non-profit brand in a CRM appeal. Perceived team success was revealed as moderator, while warmth, brand attitude served as serial mediators on purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides evidence-based insights to sport marketers to leverage CRM strategy in strengthening brand-related outcomes. Sport marketers may find the CRM strategy useful for engaging “casual” fans. Further analysis is needed to determine the generalizability of this consumer response to CRM in other product domains.

Practical implications

Practical implications include leveraging CRM strategy to strengthen brand-related outcomes (i.e. perceived warmth, brand attitude and purchase intention), while also being mindful of the timing of CRM initiatives to optimize engagement. Sport marketers may find the CRM strategy useful for engaging “casual” fans.

Originality/value

This paper lends clarity to brand attitude formation in the context of CRM. The findings of this paper demonstrate the influence of perceived warmth, brand attitude and success on purchase intention.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lawrence M. Paska

The introduction presents the challenges of teaching history and social studies within a society that questions why we should learn about the past. It summarizes federal…

Abstract

The introduction presents the challenges of teaching history and social studies within a society that questions why we should learn about the past. It summarizes federal legislation and funding that have both expanded and limited history education at various times. It suggests that historical interpretation and performance are ways to engage students in their ability to make meaning of the past and engage in inquiry, at a time when student access to historical information and media is often overwhelming. The introduction concludes with a summary of all chapters as they advance a process for historical inquiry through storytelling and interpretation.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lisa L. Heuvel

Abstract

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

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