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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Rolf van Dick and Sebastian C. Schuh

The purpose of this paper is to extend work on the leader‐follower identity transfer by providing the first empirical evidence for the causal relationship between leader…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend work on the leader‐follower identity transfer by providing the first empirical evidence for the causal relationship between leader and follower organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed causal relationship between leader and follower organizational identification (OI) was tested in a scenario study and in a laboratory experiment. Additionally, in the laboratory experiment the impact of leader OI on follower performance was examined.

Findings

The results suggest that highly identified leaders positively influence their followers' attitudes and performance by affecting their self‐concept, i.e. increasing their OI.

Practical implications

Improving leader OI provides a promising way for organizations to increase their employees' OI and performance.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first empirical evidence for the proposed causal relationship between leader and follower OI, with implications for individual and organizational effectiveness.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Uta Schloegel, Sebastian Stegmann, Alexander Maedche and Rolf van Dick

Research on agile software development (ASD) has so far primarily focused on processes and tools. Recently, researchers have started to investigate the social dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on agile software development (ASD) has so far primarily focused on processes and tools. Recently, researchers have started to investigate the social dimensions of ASD. The authors contribute to this and examine the largely invisible psychological factor of age stereotypes as one important social dimension of ASD. Driven by demographic change, employees of different age groups will need to work closely together in ASD in the future. However, age stereotypes can hinder many aspects of communication, cooperation and coordination in these self-managed teams. The purpose of this paper is to identify and differentiate age stereotypes in ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey at the individual level was conducted with 464 employees in two software development companies. The authors developed an age stereotype model for ASD and developed two scales to measure performance expectations (PEs) in ASD.

Findings

Employees in ASD show a bias in general PEs, favoring middle-aged employees over both younger and older employees. The perceived PE of a developer decreases over working life. Furthermore, the data show a complex interplay of age and job role in both the research participants and the group evaluated. Younger developers hold the strongest negative age stereotypes and older developers suffer most from stereotypes.

Practical implications

Management should enact formal or informal measures against stereotypes when an older or younger employee joins a team of members of other age groups, or when a new team is formed. In addition, the authors propose human resources to create permeable career paths.

Originality/value

The study extends the stereotype content model by adding additional age groups and including job role as a moderating variable. It identifies obstacles in daily employee interactions in agile development, and proposes ways of incorporating invisible psychological aspects in ASD-specific theories.

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Lorenzo Avanzi, Franco Fraccaroli, Guido Sarchielli, Johannes Ullrich and Rolf van Dick

– The purpose of this paper is to combine social identity and social exchange theories into a model explaining turnover intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine social identity and social exchange theories into a model explaining turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires measuring the constructs of organizational identification, perceived organizational support, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intentions were completed by 195 employees.

Findings

Results supported our hypotheses: social identification increased the perception of organizational support which in turn reduced emotional exhaustion which was finally related to turnover intentions. Furthermore, social identification moderated the relation between organizational support and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The study design was cross-sectional and data were collected using self-report with no assessment of objective data.

Practical implications

To reduce turnover, managers should focus on both support and employees’ identification with teams and organizations.

Originality/value

This study combines two theoretical perspectives into an integrative framework and simultaneous moderated-mediation was used to test the model.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Nina M. Junker, Sebastian Stegmann, Stephan Braun and Rolf Van Dick

Research on implicit followership theories – that is, individually held assumptions about how followers are and how they should be – is still in its infancy. The few…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on implicit followership theories – that is, individually held assumptions about how followers are and how they should be – is still in its infancy. The few existing approaches differ in what they define as the object of these theories. The authors consider the lack of two aspects in the existing literature: first, the authors consider it important to not only focus on effective but also on ideal followers – which allows investigating follower characteristics that go beyond just performance; and second, the authors demonstrate the importance of the study of characteristics which leaders explicitly see as undesirable for followers (i.e. counter-ideal follower prototypes). The purpose of this paper is to fill these gaps and to extend the literature by introducing the concept of implicit followership theories as assumptions of ideal followers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first present three studies conducted to develop a scale to measure ideal and counter-ideal follower prototypes, respectively. In a fourth study, the authors apply this scale and compare it to existing measures of implicit followership theories regarding their value for predicting leaders’ follower ratings.

Findings

Results show that the newly developed measure is reliable and valid, and comprises a useful tool for future research.

Practical implications

The scale can be used for leadership development programs.

Originality/value

The study is among the few that provide theory and evidence for the relevance of implicit followership theories and is the first to consider the ideal follower in this regard.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Johannes Ullrich and Rolf van Dick

The presumed financial benefits of mergers & acquisitions (M&As) often do not materialize. At the same time, M&As are reported to create a host of negative reactions on…

Abstract

The presumed financial benefits of mergers & acquisitions (M&As) often do not materialize. At the same time, M&As are reported to create a host of negative reactions on the part of the employees involved. In recent years, these circumstances have led many scholars to use the social identity approach (SIA) in order to better understand the group psychology of M&As. This paper reviews recent M&A research inspired by the SIA and derives three general lessons that are explained in some detail: First, post-merger identification is important for M&As integration and success. Second, M&As pose a threat to organizational identification. Therefore, and third, if you have to merge – merge right.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1381-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2020

Anna Aleksandra Lupina-Wegener, Shuang Liang, Rolf van Dick and Johannes Ullrich

Building on social identity theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how European managers construct their multiple identities after being acquired by a Chinese…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on social identity theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how European managers construct their multiple identities after being acquired by a Chinese firm and to determine the key factors contributing to the changing dynamics of multiple organizational identities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a qualitative, single case study of a Chinese acquisition of a European manufacturing firm at two points in time.

Findings

We find that multiple identities initially trigger ambivalence toward the acquisition, but over time, the ambivalence diminishes. The reduction of ambivalence results from concurrent integration and separation: a newly constructed boundary spanning the organization separates positive identities from negative ones, and integration interventions foster the development of a new, shared identity.

Originality/value

The findings reveal that organizational identity change is facilitated by the aligning of a post-merger identity with the acquired organization's historical identity and by creating an ambivalent boundary spanning identity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Ali Ahmad Bodla, Ningyu Tang, Rolf Van Dick and Usman Riaz Mir

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between authoritarian leadership, organizational citizenship behavior toward one’s supervisor (OCBS) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between authoritarian leadership, organizational citizenship behavior toward one’s supervisor (OCBS) and organizational deviance. The authors hypothesized curvilinear relationships between authoritarian leadership and OCBS, and between authoritarian leadership and organizational deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed two-source survey data of 240 employee–supervisor dyads collected from seven organizations in Pakistan.

Findings

Employees exhibited most OCBS and least organizational deviance at intermediate levels of authoritarian leadership. Employees’ perception of a benevolent climate at work moderated the curvilinear relations.

Research limitations/implications

The authors cannot draw causal inferences because of cross-sectional data. Furthermore, the authors’ results may be limited to cultures with high collectivism and high power distance.

Practical implications

This study envisions and illuminates a new avenue of curvilinear relationships among authoritarian leadership, OCBS and organizational deviance.

Originality/value

The two sources (employee–supervisor dyads) data collected from seven organizations supported a unique curvilinear relationship between authoritarian leadership, OCBS and organizational deviance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Rolf van Dick, Patrick A. Tissington and Guido Hertel

The purpose of this paper is to challenge the assumption that process losses of individuals working in teams are unavoidable. The paper aims to challenge this assumption…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge the assumption that process losses of individuals working in teams are unavoidable. The paper aims to challenge this assumption on the basis of social identity theory and recent research.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted in this paper is to review the mainstream literature providing strong evidence for motivation problems of individuals working in groups. Based on more recent literature, innovative ways to overcome these problems are discussed.

Findings

A social identity‐based analysis and recent findings summarized in this paper show that social loafing can be overcome and that even motivation gains in group work can be expected when groups are important for the individual group members' self‐concepts.

Practical implications

The paper provides human resource professionals and front‐line managers with suggestions as to how individual motivation and performance might be increased when working in teams.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by challenging the existing approach to reducing social loafing, i.e. individualizing workers as much as possible, and proposes a team‐based approach instead to overcome motivation problems.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Anna A. Łupina‐Wegener, Susan C. Schneider and Rolf van Dick

Building on social identity theory, the purpose of this paper is to present a study on the socio‐cultural integration process in a merger of two European pharmaceutical…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on social identity theory, the purpose of this paper is to present a study on the socio‐cultural integration process in a merger of two European pharmaceutical subsidiaries in Mexico. The paper investigates antecedents of perceived threat to pre‐merger identities in an officially claimed “merger‐of‐equals”.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methods approach was adopted comprising semi‐structured interviews (with 37 interview partners) and standardized employee surveys with 890 respondents.

Findings

Findings indicate that identity of the new organization was largely shared among members of the different subgroups. Though the employees considered their pre‐merger identities to be at stake (as demonstrated through the interviews), this experienced threat was not very strongly expressed in the survey. In fact, the sub‐groups were able to maintain distinctiveness, acknowledge the value added of each group, and had access to resources.

Research limitations/implications

The main study limitation concerns the fact that this research was conducted using a cross‐sectional design. It would be interesting in future research to observe the processes as they unfold over time.

Practical implications

The paper's findings may help managers and change agents to understand that within merger partners, subgroups exist and different concerns in terms of their identity may emerge.

Originality/value

The results shed light on how shared identity in the new organization can successfully develop despite different perceptions of the integration process of members from the acquired and the acquiring groups. In contrast to past research findings on M&As, positive results were achieved despite contradictory perceptions of integration process of members of the acquired and the acquiring groups.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Elfi Furtmueller, Rolf van Dick and Celeste P.M. Wilderom

This paper seeks to question and discuss the relevance of organizational, customer and professional commitment for effectively managing financial service firms. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to question and discuss the relevance of organizational, customer and professional commitment for effectively managing financial service firms. In particular, it aims to study differences between employed and self‐employed finance professionals.

Design/methodology approach

The authors conducted in‐depth interviews with professionals in 30 finance firms in Austria. The interviews aimed to reveal professionals' notions of commitment as it pertains to each interviewee's specific work context, whether self‐employed or employed.

Findings

Although the financial services sector requires professionals to routinely display both high customer and professional commitment, it appears that organizational commitment is unrelated to performance. While employed finance professionals experience conflicts between organizational and customer commitment (e.g. selling in‐house products that may not perfectly match customers' needs), self‐employed professionals tend to clash between customers' best interests and their own self‐interest (e.g. selling products and services for which they receive the highest commission). All professionals noted that they work in a competitive environment with a focus on individual sales. Individual performance ratings were found to prevent the development of strong branch or team commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Although qualitative methods are a starting‐point for identifying serious issues, quantitative studies across larger samples are needed to evaluate the scope of the findings.

Practical implications

The findings imply that financial services may not benefit much from HRM efforts that strive to obtain firm‐wide or organizational commitment. In large financial service firms the routine turnover of good professionals can be curbed if management starts to pay attention to creating flexible work arrangements, and enabling professionals to commit to customers and their profession.

Originality/value

While prior research suggests fostering the organizational commitment of employees, this study finds the concept of organization‐wide commitment to be of less importance for managing finance firms. This lack of importance of organizational commitment was found to be independent of finance professionals' contractual status (employed or self‐employed); whereas customer and professional commitment were associated with high performance motivation.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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