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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2010

Christopher C. Rosen, Chu-Hsiang Chang, Emilija Djurdjevic and Erin Eatough

This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category…

Abstract

This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category taxonomy of workplace stressors and we then review theories that explain the relationships between workplace stressors and job performance. The subsequent literature review is divided into two sections. In the first section, we present a summary of Jex's (1998) review of research on the job stress–job performance relationship. In the second section, we provide an updated review of the literature, which includes studies that have been published since 1998. In this review, we evaluate how well the contemporary research has dealt with weaknesses and limitations previously identified in the literature, we identify and evaluate current trends, and we offer recommendations and directions for future research.

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New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Wee Chan Au and Pervaiz Khalid Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of superior support, in the presence of a range of work role stressors, on both conflict and enrichment aspects of…

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2941

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of superior support, in the presence of a range of work role stressors, on both conflict and enrichment aspects of work-life interface simultaneously. The paper frames the research narrative of superior support by contextualizing it within superior’s dichotomous and opposing roles of organizational performance driver and support provider.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was collected from Malaysian work adults. Drawing on a sample of 1,051 cases, structural equation modeling technique is used to examine the effect of superior support, with the presence of work role stressors, on individuals’ work-life experience. Three alternate models are compared: superior support as moderator of stressors-strain relationship; both superior support and work stressors as direct antecedents of work-life experience; and superior support as indirect antecedent (mediated by work role stressors) of work-life experience.

Findings

Findings evidence the favorable model of superior support as indirect antecedent (mediated by work role stressors) of work-life experience. In addition, superior support has significant impact on work role ambiguity and work-life enrichment, however, its effect on work role conflict, work role overload and work-life conflict is not significant. Findings of the study also demonstrate the distinct effect of work role stressors on work-life experience in terms of direction and strength of impact.

Practical implications

While superior support promotes greater work-life enrichment, its effect on work-life conflict is limited. Therefore, instead of superior support, employers have to identify alternate resources to assist employees to deal with conflict and interference of work-life interface. Distinctiveness of various work role stressors and interaction between these work role stressors offer practical implications to employer that all stressors at workplace should not be treated as identical and common to each other. Distinct effort should be taken to address different forms of work role stressors so that work-life conflict (resource depletion) can be minimized while work-life enrichment (resource gaining) can be enhanced.

Originality/value

The research investigates superior support in relation to work stressor and work-life experience by scrutinizing the role of supervisors from the vantage point of supervisors as performance drivers as well as support providers. This provides a balanced narrative as compared to previous research focussing solely on either the support perspective or the employee effort extraction perspective. In its execution, the research incorporates enrichment aspect of work-life experience, in addition to the conflict and negative effect. Drawing on the Conservation of Resources Theory, the study teases out important implication for employers and researchers to show that superior support and work role stressors come together to shape individuals’ work-life experience by depleting resources (work-life conflict) and gaining resources (work-life enrichment) simultaneously, as well as drawing out the dilemma of supervisors as performance drivers and support providers at the same time.

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Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Juhyun Kang and Jichul Jang

This paper aims to examine the influence of role stressors on service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) mediated by depersonalization, with a moderator of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of role stressors on service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) mediated by depersonalization, with a moderator of social capital.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered online survey was completed by 265 current hotel frontline employees in the USA.

Findings

The study reveals that role ambiguity has a detrimental impact on service-oriented OCB. The results show that depersonalization is found to be a critical mediator that modifies the implications of both role ambiguity and role conflict for service-oriented OCB. Furthermore, the negative effect of role conflict on depersonalization is buffered by social capital.

Practical implications

Hotel firms that would like to encourage employees to exert proactive behaviors in their jobs might benefit from developing an effective way to reduce role stressors in their jobs. However, given that such role stressors are inevitable in the workplace, hotel firms should place more emphasis on enhancing social capital as an effective way to manage role stressors in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study advances previous studies on role stressors and service-oriented OCB by addressing how and why role stressors influence employees’ service-oriented OCB. This study incorporates advanced job demand-resource theory by identifying social capital as a critical job resource to buffer the detrimental impact of role conflict on depersonalization in the hotel context.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Yiran Jiang, Lan Xu, Nan Cui, Hui Zhang and Zhilin Yang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of customer participation on role behaviors and customer satisfaction. The mediating role of role stressors is also examined.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of customer participation on role behaviors and customer satisfaction. The mediating role of role stressors is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on literature reviews, a survey of 317 bank customers was conducted in Central China, using a structured questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used for data analysis to test research hypotheses.

Findings

The current work found that the inconsistency between the role expectations from participating customers and service providers would increase the customer perceived role stress. Therefore, customer participating width and depth can affect customer satisfaction in two different ways. On the one hand, role stressors (i.e. role ambiguity and role conflict) in customer participation have a negative effect on customer compliance, decreasing customer satisfaction. On the other hand, role stressors have a positive effect on customer creativity, increasing customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

No prior studies, thus far, have examined how customer perceived role stressors in service participation affect customers’ role performance and satisfaction in the service process. The current research identifies the characteristics of customer participation from the perspectives of task role set. On the basis of role stressor theory, this research examines the effects of customer participation width and depth on customer satisfaction using customer perceived role stressors as mediating variables. This research also investigates the mixed effect of role stressors on customer satisfaction. It provides empirical support for the role of customers as “co-creators” by distinguishing customers’ creative behaviors from customer compliance and finds the positive effect of role stressors on customer satisfaction via customer creativity.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Su-Fen Chiu, Shih-Pin Yeh and Tun Chun Huang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among role stressors, social support, and employee deviance. Specifically, this study explores the…

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2831

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among role stressors, social support, and employee deviance. Specifically, this study explores the relationships of role stressors (i.e. role conflict, role ambiguity, and role overload) to interpersonal and organisational employee deviance. Furthermore, this study examines the moderating role of social support (from supervisors and coworkers) on the above relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 326 paired samples of sales and customer service employees as well as their immediate supervisors in Taiwan.

Findings

Role conflict had a positive relationship with both organisational and interpersonal deviance. Role ambiguity was positively, while role overload was negatively related to organisational deviance, respectively. Role ambiguity was more strongly related to organisational than to interpersonal deviance. Coworker support had a significant moderating effect on the role overload – interpersonal deviance relationship.

Practical implications

Organisations may implement policies and programs, such as clarification of job responsibility, provision of performance feedback and training in stress coping techniques, to lessen the negative effect of role conflict, and role ambiguity on employee deviance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in several ways. First, this study extends prior research on stressor-performance relationship by investigating the effect of role stressors on two forms of employee deviance (interpersonal deviance and organisational deviance) in a collectivist cultural context (i.e. Taiwan). Second, this study demonstrates that work-related characteristics (e.g. role stressors) have different degrees of effect on interpersonal and organisational deviance. Third, this research offers explanations on why there is little support for the moderating effect of social support on the stressor-deviance relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Mary L. Cooper, Margaret E. Knight, M. Lance Frazier and Daniel W. Law

As exhaustion is a core dimension of job burnout, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that individual perceptions of supervisor conflict management style…

Abstract

Purpose

As exhaustion is a core dimension of job burnout, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that individual perceptions of supervisor conflict management style (collaborative, dominating and avoidant) are antecedents of role stressors (role conflict, role ambiguity and role overload) in public accounting exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey results from a sample of 208 public accountants from six firms in upstate New York are used to test the conceptual model using regression and mediation techniques.

Findings

The findings indicate that perceptions of collaborative and dominating conflict management styles are important antecedents to the role stressors that precede exhaustion in public accounting. The findings also indicate that collaborative and dominating management styles have an indirect effect on exhaustion through both role conflict and role overload.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was taken from six accounting firms in one geographic area of the USA and may not be representative of all public accountants. As a result, generalizability may be limited. Theoretical implications include expansion of the existing public accounting exhaustion model to incorporate individual perceptions of conflict management styles as antecedents to role stressors, and consequently to demonstrate the indirect effects of these conflict management styles on exhaustion.

Practical implications

This study’s findings provide practitioners with insight regarding conflict management styles, specifically which ones have a positive versus negative effect on role stressors. This can be considered in hiring, training and promotion decisions in firms’ efforts to reduce exhaustion.

Originality/value

This augmentation of the existing public accounting exhaustion model is unique, as prior research has not examined individual perceptions of conflict management style. This not only enriches the model but also is actionable by public accounting firms seeking to mitigate exhaustion.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Bindu Chhabra

The purpose of the present study was to explore the direct effects of work role stressors and subjective fit perceptions on the employee outcomes of job satisfaction…

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1434

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study was to explore the direct effects of work role stressors and subjective fit perceptions on the employee outcomes of job satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and turnover intentions. The study further aimed to investigate the moderating role of person-organization (P-O) fit, demands-abilities (D-A) fit and needs supplies (N-S) fit in the relationship between work role stressors and the aforementioned employee outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using structured questionnaires for measuring the aforementioned variables. The sample of the study was 317 professionals from five sectors. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Hierarchical multiple regression showed that the work role stressors were negatively related to job satisfaction and OCB and positively related to turnover intentions. Subjective fit was seen to be positively related to job satisfaction and OCB and negatively related to turnover intentions. The analysis also found some support for the stress buffering effect of high subjective fit in the prediction of job satisfaction, OCB and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the organizational behavior literature by focusing on the fact that the negative effects of work role stressors on employee outcomes can be mitigated by identifying the variables which act as a buffer to weaken this effect. The results of the study highlight the importance of the concept of subjective fit for the managers and the employees to help them in coping up with the demands of the job. They provide support for the fact that matching employees to their organization and job can help in the mitigation of employees’ stress, resulting in positive employee outcomes, hence benefiting the organization in the long run.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind to investigate the moderating role of P-O fit, D-A fit and N-S perceptions in the relationship between work role stressors and employee outcomes, especially in the Indian context.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Pei‐Lee Teh, Keng‐Boon Ooi and Chen‐Chen Yong

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model to examine the multidimensionality of total quality management (TQM) practices and its impact on role stressors.

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1868

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model to examine the multidimensionality of total quality management (TQM) practices and its impact on role stressors.

Design/methodology/approach

The background of TQM philosophy and theory of role stressors serve as starting‐points to develop the conceptual model. From the extensive literature review, six practices of TQM and two components of role stressors were identified to construct the model.

Findings

The model based on TQM with respect to role stressors provides a basis for assessing the level of role conflict and role ambiguity under which the use of different aspects of TQM should be retained or revised. This finding suggests that TQM is not a panacea that can be unthinkingly applied, but must be practised with a clear sense of the impact on role stressors.

Practical implications

Given that role stressors are often detrimental to organizational functional efficiency, it is appropriate for management to invest time and effort to diagnose effects of implementation of TQM practices on role stressors. For this analysis, this model will prove valuable.

Originality/value

This conceptual model provides an insightful foundation for the analysis of multidimensionality of TQM practices on role stressors. The model examines the independent influences of TQM practices on role stressors and treats role conflict and role ambiguity as dependent variables. This design stands in contrast to other researchers' study of conflict and ambiguity as independent variables.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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