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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2012

Jane Q. He and Chong M. Lau

Purpose – The adoption of performance measurement and evaluation systems comprising nonfinancial measures has rendered the investigation of behavioral consequences of such…

Abstract

Purpose – The adoption of performance measurement and evaluation systems comprising nonfinancial measures has rendered the investigation of behavioral consequences of such measures an increasingly important research issue. The purpose of this study is to investigate the process by which the use of nonfinancial measures affects employees’ perceptions of procedural fairness. It proposes that the effects of nonfinancial measures on procedural fairness are indirect through the mediating variables of (1) job relevant information and (2) role clarity.

Methodology – Data collected from a survey of 276 managers in different functional areas are used to test the models. The data are analyzed using structural equation modeling (Partial Least Square).

Findings – Results from structural models indicate that the use of nonfinancial measures has a positive impact on job relevant information, role clarity, and procedural fairness. In addition, the findings suggest that the use of nonfinancial measures is indirectly related to procedural fairness through job relevant information and role clarity. Specifically, the results indicate that the use of nonfinancial measures affects job relevant information. Job relevant information then influences role clarity. Role clarity, in turn, is positively related to procedural fairness.

Value of paper – This study provides systematic empirical evidence on how the use of nonfinancial measures for performance measurement and evaluation can affect employee perceptions of procedural fairness. It helps organizations to understand how this process occurs and provides them with some assurance that the adoption of nonfinancial measures may be beneficial particularly through the higher information content of such measures and the consequential enhancement of employee role clarity and perception of fairness. By studying the effects of nonfinancial measures, in isolation, this study also helps to demonstrate to organizations that some of the beneficial effects on employee outcomes found by prior management accounting studies involving a combination of financial and nonfinancial measures may be achievable from the use of nonfinancial measures alone without the need of financial measures. This may assist organizations in designing simpler performance measurement systems.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Global Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-910-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Ravipreet S. Sohi

Develops a structural equations model which examines the effects of environmental dynamism and heterogeneity on salespeople’s role conflict, role ambiguity, performance

Abstract

Develops a structural equations model which examines the effects of environmental dynamism and heterogeneity on salespeople’s role conflict, role ambiguity, performance and job satisfaction. The model is tested with EQS, using data collected from 230 salespeople in multiple companies and industries. Indicates that environmental dynamism reduces satisfaction and performance, and increases role conflict and ambiguity. Notes that environmental heterogeneity also reduces performance and increases role conflict, but does not have a significant effect on role ambiguity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Chiyin Chen and Ningyu Tang

Perceived inclusion refers to employees’ perception of their inclusion status in the workplace. This concept offers a new perspective to understand employees’ experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

Perceived inclusion refers to employees’ perception of their inclusion status in the workplace. This concept offers a new perspective to understand employees’ experiences within today’s complex working environment. However, research on how perceived inclusion influences employee behavior is lacking. The purpose of this paper is to explore the mechanism of perceived inclusion through the lens of the social exchange perspective and role identity theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 257 employees and 60 supervisors in a manufacturing company. Multi-level structural equation modeling and the Monte Carlo method were applied to test the mediation effect.

Findings

The results indicated that employees’ perceived inclusion was positively associated with job role and innovator role performance through the mediation of organizational commitment. Perceived inclusion was also directly associated with team role performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to empirically examine perceived inclusion in the workplace from the social exchange and role identity perspective. It revealed that perceived inclusion fosters employees’ commitment toward the organization, which in turn influences their work-role behaviors. Theoretical contributions and practical implications are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Daniel Örtqvist, Mateja Drnovsek and Joakim Wincent

The purpose of this study is to analyze entrepreneurs' coping strategies used to face stakeholders' expectations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze entrepreneurs' coping strategies used to face stakeholders' expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from the general management, role theory, and entrepreneurship literature to develop hypotheses that are tested by using hierarchical regression techniques on a sample of 183 Slovenian entrepreneurs. The paper develops and tests four coping strategies (structural role redefinition, personal role redefinition, reactive role behavior, and passive role behavior) to assess influence on new venture performance. The analysis examines moderating effects of entrepreneurs' perceived role‐related stress.

Findings

Results reveal that coping strategies focused on reducing expectations and/or working harder to meet expectations positively affect new venture performance. However, entrepreneurs' focus on suppressing perceived expectations negatively influences new venture performance. Furthermore, entrepreneurs' role‐related stress moderates the relationship between reactive role behavior and new venture performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a better understanding of types of coping strategies available to entrepreneurs and practical consequences for new venture performance. It also explores why some entrepreneurs perform well and why some may quit early being an entrepreneur while others remain and prosper in their role. Possible study limitations are discussed due to sample characteristics and measurement.

Practical implications

The study results are relevant for practising and nascent entrepreneurs, support organizations, and policy makers since empirical evidence can be used in designing entrepreneurs' training and competency‐building programs.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to illustrate effects on early entrepreneurial performance of coping strategies to meet stakeholders' expectations and, indirectly, entrepreneurs' ability to endure establishing a new venture.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Chong M. Lau

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain if it is procedural fairness, or role clarity, or both procedural fairness and role clarity that mediate the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain if it is procedural fairness, or role clarity, or both procedural fairness and role clarity that mediate the relationship between non-financial measures and managerial performance. Role clarity and procedural fairness may mediate the relationship between performance measures and managerial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was used to collect the required data. The sample was drawn from 149 managers from 103 large manufacturing organisations located in the UK. The data were analysed by structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate that it is role clarity that significantly mediates the relationship between non-financial measures and managerial performance. Surprisingly, procedural fairness has no significant mediating effect on the relationship.

Originality/value

To date, no prior studies have investigated systematically the effects of non-financial measures as well as the mechanism by which non-financial measures influence role clarity, procedural fairness and managerial performance. This study contributes by incorporating both procedural fairness and role clarity within an integrated model. This assists the research to ascertain precisely which variable (procedural fairness or role clarity) mediates the relationship between non-financial measures and managerial performance as well as the relative strengths of the two mediating variables.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Alka Rai, Piyali Ghosh, Ragini Chauhan and Richa Singh

This study aims to explore the possibility that rewards and recognition may be instrumental in improving both in-role and extra-role performances of retail sales…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the possibility that rewards and recognition may be instrumental in improving both in-role and extra-role performances of retail sales associates, with an underlying mediating role of employee engagement in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted across 35 retail stores in five cities located in North India on 247 sales associates. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted to test the mediation hypotheses. Analysis was done in lines with the conditions of mediation laid down by Baron and Kenny (1986).

Findings

Employee engagement is found to fully mediate the impact of rewards and recognition on in-role and extra-role performances.

Practical implications

Organizations should be committed to recognizing employees’ efforts and providing them with financial and non-financial rewards based on organizational policies. Such measures would improve in-role and extra-role performances through enhancing engagement level of employees.

Originality/value

This study makes significant contributions to literature on employee engagement and that on retail sector, especially in Indian context, through highlighting the mediating role of engagement. Given shortage and retention of skilled manpower as major challenges for Indian retailers, engaging sales associates through rewards and recognition to improve their performance at both in-role and extra-role levels can have significant implications for retailers.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2010

Christopher C. Rosen, Chu-Hsiang Chang, Emilija Djurdjevic and Erin Eatough

This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category…

Abstract

This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category taxonomy of workplace stressors and we then review theories that explain the relationships between workplace stressors and job performance. The subsequent literature review is divided into two sections. In the first section, we present a summary of Jex's (1998) review of research on the job stress–job performance relationship. In the second section, we provide an updated review of the literature, which includes studies that have been published since 1998. In this review, we evaluate how well the contemporary research has dealt with weaknesses and limitations previously identified in the literature, we identify and evaluate current trends, and we offer recommendations and directions for future research.

Details

New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Satyanarayana Parayitam, Syed Aktharsha Usman, Rajeshwaran Raja Namasivaayam and Mohamed Shaik Naina

This paper aims to investigate the importance of knowledge management as a moderator in the relationship between two of the burnout variables, namely, role ambiguity and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the importance of knowledge management as a moderator in the relationship between two of the burnout variables, namely, role ambiguity and work overload. In addition, the paper tests a conceptual model where emotional exhaustion is a moderator in the relationship between role ambiguity, work overload and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured survey instrument, this paper gathered data from 692 respondents from the information technology industry in the southern part of India. The first psychometric properties of the instrument were tested and then hierarchical regression was used as a statistical technique for analyzing the data.

Findings

Results show that role conflict is positively related to role ambiguity and work overload, role ambiguity is negatively related to performance, work overload is positively related to performance, knowledge management moderates the relationship between role conflict and role ambiguity and role conflict and work overload. The hierarchical regression results also support that emotional exhaustion moderates the relationship between role ambiguity and performance and work overload and performance.

Research limitations/implications

As the present research is based on self-report measures, the limitations of social desirability bias and common method bias are inherent. However, this study attempts to minimize these limitations by following appropriate statistical techniques and procedures.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both practicing managers and the literature on conflict management. The study suggests that managers use knowledge management practices to mitigate the ill-effects of role conflict and enhance performance. This study also highlights the role of emotional exhaustion in organizations.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights about the importance of knowledge management practices and emotional exhaustion in the relationship between role conflict and performance. To the knowledge, the importance of knowledge management practices is underemphasized in conflict management research. The study also provides insights into the role of one of the burnout variables i.e. emotional exhaustion in its influence on performance. The implications of this relationship for organizational role theory and organizational learning theory and for management practice, are discussed.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Applying Partial Least Squares in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-700-9

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Yana Du, Li Zhang and Yanhong Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of creative process engagement on employees’ in-role performance, and does so by considering the support that employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of creative process engagement on employees’ in-role performance, and does so by considering the support that employees received from and given to their supervisors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from 540 questionnaires collected in China, this paper conducts a hierarchical regression analysis to test the proposed model.

Findings

Creative process engagement positively affects employees’ in-role performance. However, the moderating effect of receiving support on the above relationship is not significant. Instead, it is the interaction of receiving support from and giving it to supervisors that moderates the relationship between creative process engagement and in-role performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study has some contributions to the conservation of resource (COR) theory. The authors find that acquiring new resources such as receiving support from supervisors is not always effective. The acquisition process of resources should be considered with the investment process of resources. According to the COR theory, people invest resources to gain resources and protect themselves from losing resources or to recover from resource loss (Halbesleben et al., 2014). The findings of the study show that employees investing resources is not just for gaining resources. Sometimes, they invest resources such as giving support to supervisors to remain a relatively balanced relationship.

Practical implications

Companies can encourage employees to place more attention on creative process engagement to improve in-role performance. In addition, when offering support to employees, managers should consider whether the employees are able to give it back in response to the received support, and distribute their support to employees accordingly.

Originality/value

This paper explored employee’s engagement at creative process in a more novel way and clarified the relative effect of creative process engagement on in-role performance. Also, this paper was the first to pay attention to the bidirectional nature of supervisor support.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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