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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

René Börner, Jürgen Moormann and Minhong Wang

The paper aims to explore staff's experience with role‐plays using the example of training bank employees in Six Sigma as a major methodology for business process improvement.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore staff's experience with role‐plays using the example of training bank employees in Six Sigma as a major methodology for business process improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a case study. A role‐play, KreditSim, is used to simulate a loan approval process that has to be improved by the participants. KreditSim has been conducted many times with various groups in both academic and professional environments. The authors used five role‐play sessions to conduct a survey among the participants and questioned seven facilitators experienced in KreditSim to generate empirical evidence for the effectiveness of such role‐plays.

Findings

Role‐play based simulations complement training programs in terms of active participation and first‐hand experience. Not only methodological learning is achieved but social and communicative as well as affective learning are supported, too. The employed role‐play highlights the relevance and applicability of the Six Sigma methodology to staff's day‐to‐day responsibilities. Besides boosting awareness for process thinking, the role‐play also helps to engage staff members in process improvement efforts.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation to the results might be the small number of facilitators that supervised the role‐play sessions so far. Thus, results may not be representative in a statistical sense. Moreover, the design of KreditSim could be modified in different ways for future seminars. Using software to automate certain activities is one possible modification. Ongoing research investigates in how far such modifications influence the effectiveness and the participant's perception of the role‐play.

Practical implications

The present study reveals that role‐plays can be effectively used for staff training. The results show that staff are strongly receptive to role‐plays in the context of business process improvement. Furthermore, several objectives such as methodological or social learning can be pursued and combined by this type of training instrument.

Originality/value

This article contributes to existing research in analyzing the effectiveness of role‐plays in a workplace setting. The paper is based on a number of professional role‐play sessions within the financial services sector. The survey comprises multiple dimensions of learning and supports that staff appreciate the usage of role‐play based simulation in a workplace environment.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Kirsi Kettula and Sami Berghäll

The purpose of this study is to determine how closely an in-class role-play can mirror and capture the features and characteristics of work-based learning with real-life…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine how closely an in-class role-play can mirror and capture the features and characteristics of work-based learning with real-life working experiences. The aim is also to discuss the potential and drawbacks of using role-play as a form of work-related learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study relies on qualitative data obtained from learning journals covering learning experiences on a role-play exercise. In total, 16 undergraduate students participated in a course in business-to-business marketing and took part in a series of face-to-face simulations.

Findings

Compared to the characteristics, features and potential outcomes of work-based learning, role-play can entail several similar learning outcomes. The strengths of a role-play are many. Participants can practise real-life situations in a safe environment; their learning is not restricted to a particular work setting; they are able to learn through reflection, and conflicts between stakeholders can be avoided. The comparative weaknesses include a lack of support from senior colleagues and an unclear contribution to the real world. Furthermore, the method may produce stereotypes or anxiety in the participants.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small target group, reliance on one source of data, and the phenomenological nature of findings, further studies are needed with larger target groups and different research approaches.

Practical implications

The findings reveal that role-play can offer higher education a supplementary tool for work-based learning.

Originality/value

In higher education, role-play may serve as a tool to reach many of the learning objectives of work-based learning, especially if real workplace experiences cannot be arranged.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Kristina Zgodavova, Matus Kisela and Andrea Sutoova

The purpose of this paper is to contribute learning, knowledge creation and knowledge transfer obtained through a web-based role-play simulation environment as an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute learning, knowledge creation and knowledge transfer obtained through a web-based role-play simulation environment as an intelligent approach towards organisational change. Such change occurs in the organisation during its transition to a new version of the ISO 9001:2015.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a literature review and the experience of the authors and a team of international teaching and research staff, as well as on information obtained from satisfaction surveys.

Findings

The actual version of the web-based Management System Role-Play Simulation (MS-RPS©) considers the changes in structure and terminology of the ISO management system standards, enables the creation of a predictive strategy regarding organisational culture, minimises the negative impact of the change and helps people adapt more quickly to it.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the complexity of an actual system and the possible verification of empirical results. Another limitation is the measurability of any real enhancement achieved in the quality, safety and sustainability of production, as well as the business continuity and social responsibility of an organisation.

Practical implications

One benefit of the training is the thorough knowledge that players within organisational management can gain in a short period. Reduced resistance to change is also stressed and the complexity and dynamism of the internal environment considered.

Originality/value

MS-RPS© is based on original web-based software. The primary model has been developed at the Technical University of Košice. It was tested by students, but also by managers and other employees in several industrial organisations, as well as services, over 20 years.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

John Y. Cousins and Marilyn F. McDougall

The development of communication skills is increasingly a keyelement in the training of staff who have a regular contact with thepublic. The Glasgow Garden Festival took…

Abstract

The development of communication skills is increasingly a key element in the training of staff who have a regular contact with the public. The Glasgow Garden Festival took place over the summer of 1988. For the purposes of staffing the information centre, the Inverclyde Initiative chose to recruit 12 people who were registered unemployed. Training was provided for these individuals in order to prepare them for the job by improving their skills and thus their ability to perform a successful role in the Festival. Details of the design of the communication skills programme using simulations and role plays as general features are considered in the article.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Peter McHardy and Teresa Allan

The Economic and Social Science Research Council’s Innovation Agenda singled out “more innovation” as a key weapon for UK companies to outperform world competitors. This…

Abstract

The Economic and Social Science Research Council’s Innovation Agenda singled out “more innovation” as a key weapon for UK companies to outperform world competitors. This research explores this Innovation Agenda from an HE perspective, and reports on a study of a final year undergraduate course in Creative Management. Students, in syndicate groups, were asked to invent their own business idea. By simulating make‐believe situations in the classroom, we aimed to approximate feelings purportedly experienced by business managers as they innovate, such as “creative tension” and “strategic discomfort”. This article argues that preparedness for creative tension is now a necessity for business graduates. Additionally, it proposes that an awareness of discomfiting strategic effects of renewal is worthwhile. For example, how might students have coped with the shock to IBM during the demise of the computer mainframe market?

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2017

Matt Bower

The ability for learners to interact online via their avatars in a 3-D simulation space means that virtual worlds afford a host of educational opportunities not offered by…

Abstract

The ability for learners to interact online via their avatars in a 3-D simulation space means that virtual worlds afford a host of educational opportunities not offered by other learning technology platforms, but their use also raises several pertinent issues that warrant consideration. This chapter reviews the educational use of virtual worlds from a design perspective. Virtual-world definitions are explored, along with their key educational characteristics. Different virtual-world environments are briefly contrasted, including Second Life, Active Worlds, Open Sim, and Minecraft. A wide variety of virtual-world uses in schools and universities are examined so as to understand their versatility. Key educational benefits of virtual worlds are distilled from the literature, such as the ability to facilitate 3-D simulations, role-plays, construction tasks, and immersive learning. Emergent issues surrounding the use of virtual worlds are also analyzed, including cognitive load, safety, and representational fidelity. One higher education and one school level vignette are provided in order to offer more detailed insight into the use of virtual worlds in practice. Recommendations for learning design and implementation are presented, based on the thematic analysis of contemporary virtual-worlds research.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Niall Piercy, Alistair Brandon‐Jones, Emma Brandon‐Jones and Colin Campbell

This paper aims to examine the preferences of students towards different teaching methods and the perceived effectiveness of experiential teaching methods in different…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the preferences of students towards different teaching methods and the perceived effectiveness of experiential teaching methods in different operations management (OM) modules.

Design/methodology/approach

Student perceptions of different teaching methods and various aspects of an experiential teaching method, in the form of a business simulation game, are examined using survey data from 274 respondents in four small post‐experience and two large pre‐experience OM modules.

Findings

The paper's analysis suggests that traditional and experiential teaching methods are both popular with OM students, whilst independent teaching methods are less well liked. Analysis also shows that students on both kinds of OM modules perceive most aspects of the experiential teaching method used in this study (The Operations Game) very positively.

Research limitations/implications

This research study was confined to a particular type of experiential teaching method – a business simulation game. There is a need for further research to investigate the perceived effectiveness of other experiential teaching methods, such as role‐plays and live cases. Furthermore, the paper does not examine the use of experiential teaching methods that do not require the physical presence of students.

Practical implications

For OM educators, the paper clarifies how they might incorporate experiential teaching methods in different class settings. Whilst experiential teaching methods are typically used for small post‐experience modules, these data indicate that the method can also be used on larger pre‐experience modules with great success. The paper also notes a number of challenges involved in using experiential teaching methods on both kinds of module.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to directly examine the perceived effectiveness of an experiential teaching method in both small post‐experience and larger pre‐experience OM modules.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Ryan Kelty, Karin De Angelis and Elizabeth Blair

This chapter presents a poverty simulation as a critical pedagogical tool that breaks down preconceptions and provides information about real-life challenges experienced…

Abstract

This chapter presents a poverty simulation as a critical pedagogical tool that breaks down preconceptions and provides information about real-life challenges experienced by those who are poor. It allows students to develop the critical thinking skills, perspective-taking, and empathy. It provides an opportunity to take social and intellectual risks, and motivates civic engagement for positive social change. As such, this chapter contributes to the volume’s focus on curriculum and pedagogical changes using education to promote social change. Simulation participants attempt to successfully negotiate four 15-minute weeks within families of various sizes and resources. At the conclusion of the simulation, participants take a few minutes to reflect in writing on their experience. Students identify and discuss the social structures that they felt helped to perpetuate their poverty, as well as how micro-level interactions (i.e., with service providers, teachers, police, people in their neighborhood) affected their outcomes. Results show students increased understanding of the social issues contributing to poverty as well as consequences of poverty, and they report an increased desire to take action to affect positive social change in their community. The chapter concludes with thoughts and recommendations on how students from various disciplines could benefit from this poverty simulation.

Details

International Perspectives on Policies, Practices & Pedagogies for Promoting Social Responsibility in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-854-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1973

Ray Heppell

No sphere of human endeavour is quite so fraught with fashionable catch‐phrases, jargon or gimmickry than that of education, and there are times when the teacher in the…

Abstract

No sphere of human endeavour is quite so fraught with fashionable catch‐phrases, jargon or gimmickry than that of education, and there are times when the teacher in the classroom must yearn for some relief from the seemingly endless barrage of new and often ill‐considered ploys which the educational pundits expect to have tried out, evaluated, and discussed in an age of all too rapid change in educational methods and techniques. One of the most common devices at present finding increasing favour is that of gaming, simulation and role‐play, and such is the growing popularity of these techniques that many publishers are wasting no time in climbing on the band‐wagon. If teachers are to accept that such methods are educationally viable then certain educational criteria must be satisfied, and if the careers teacher is to accept them as part of a careers education programme then they must clearly foster the objectives and themes of careers education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 15 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2013

Caroline Ditlev-Simonsen

The social and environmental challenges facing our society, coupled with financial scandals and crises, have led to increased focus on and expectations for corporate…

Abstract

The social and environmental challenges facing our society, coupled with financial scandals and crises, have led to increased focus on and expectations for corporate social responsibility (CSR) (Ditlev-Simonsen, 2009; Knox, Maklan, & French, 2005; Midttun, 2007; Samuel & Ioanna, 2007). However, in order to meet this expectation, business students need education in the CSR field. The amount of attention to CSR in business education varies widely (Evans, Treviño, & Weaver, 2006) and the lack of a CSR curriculum in some countries has been severely criticised, with calls for more focus on the subject (Aronsen & Bue Olsen, 2009). In Norway, for example, propositions to the Parliament about CSR urge The Research Council for Norway to pursue and strengthen their programme for financing research in this field (Utenriksdepartementet, 2009). CSR addresses normative and ethical issues, and students’ self-awareness, attitudes and understandings of others are key elements (Banaji, Bazerman, & Chugh, 2003). CSR-related situations comprise a set of dilemmas with no absolute ‘right’ or ‘wrong’. In this sense CSR education is different from most of business school education format, and therefore requires different educational tools.

Details

Education and Corporate Social Responsibility International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-590-6

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