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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

William Rand and Roland T. Rust

The purpose of this commentary is to explain that it is not useful to unnecessarily complicate a model. Striving for realism for its own sake does not advance…

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396

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this commentary is to explain that it is not useful to unnecessarily complicate a model. Striving for realism for its own sake does not advance understanding; however, making sure that a model provides valid insights is a useful goal.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors advocate that a standard should exist based on whether experts in a field think that a particular mechanism is necessary for the model to achieve the goals of validity and sufficiency.

Findings

The authors find that critiques that do not offer a more valid alternative model do not necessarily advance the production of science.

Practical implications

Decision makers need to understand the assumptions and limitations of the models that they are using, but they should also be educated on the basic concepts of modeling literacy, and develop an understanding that all models are necessarily incomplete, as to make a model a perfect reflection of the real world would not provide insightful generalizations.

Originality/value

Although the original paper provides some additional cases that should be explored in understanding the diffusion of information, the authors extend this paper by providing a standard that explains when it is necessary to examine additional extensions and when the original (less complex) model is sufficient.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Ruth N. Bolton and Crina O. Tarasi

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Donald R. Lehmann

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Roland T. Rust, Peter J. Danaher and Sajeev Varki

Although there have been many research articles about how to measure service quality, how service quality perceptions are formed, what effect service quality has on…

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5156

Abstract

Although there have been many research articles about how to measure service quality, how service quality perceptions are formed, what effect service quality has on behavior, and service quality’s financial impact, there has been little discussion to date of the potential impact of service quality on competitive marketing decisions. This paper considers directly the issue of how an analysis of the impact of comparative service quality can inform tactical marketing decisions in a competitive marketplace. We propose and empirically demonstrate a simple theoretical framework of how market share changes result from changes in service quality, by the focal firm and/or by a competitor. In addition we show how price changes trade‐off against changes in service quality, and how comparative customer value is affected by changes in service quality and/or price. Our framework enables us to evaluate the projected market share shifts produced by proactive changes in service quality and/or price, and also enables us to evaluate the projected effectiveness of reactions to competitors’ changes in service quality and price. For example, our framework suggests that a quickly‐implemented increase in service quality (rather than a matching price cut) may sometimes be an effective tactical response to a competitor’s price cut. We illustrate the implementation of our framework on actual longitudinal industry data. We show how the market share impact of changes in service quality and/or price can be projected, and how this information can be used to drive competitive marketing decisions.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Melissa Archpru Akaka and Yi He

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Timothy Lee Keiningham, Roland T. Rust, Bart Lariviere, Lerzan Aksoy and Luke Williams

Managers seeking to manage customer word-of-mouth (WOM) behavior need to understand how different attitudinal drivers (e.g. satisfaction, positive and negative emotion…

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2618

Abstract

Purpose

Managers seeking to manage customer word-of-mouth (WOM) behavior need to understand how different attitudinal drivers (e.g. satisfaction, positive and negative emotion, commitment, and self-brand connection) relate to a range of WOM behaviors. They also need to know how the effects of these drivers are moderated by customer characteristics (e.g. gender, age, income, country). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate these issues a built a large-scale multi-national database was created that includes attitudinal drivers, customer characteristics, and a full range of WOM behaviors, involving both the sending and receiving of both positive and negative WOM, with both strong and weak ties. The combination of sending-receiving, positive-negative and strong ties-weak ties results in a typology of eight distinct WOM behaviors. The investigation explores the drivers of those behaviors, and their moderators, using a hierarchical Bayes model in which all WOM behaviors are simultaneously modeled.

Findings

Among the many important findings uncovered are: the most effective way to drive all positive WOM behaviors is through maximizing affective commitment and positive emotions; minimizing negative emotions and ensuring that customers are satisfied lowers all negative WOM behaviors; all other attitudinal drivers have lower or even mixed effects on the different WOM behaviors; and customer characteristics can have a surprisingly large impact on how attitudes affect different WOM behaviors.

Practical implications

These findings have important managerial implications for promotion (which attitudes should be stimulated to produce the desired WOM behavior) and segmentation (how should marketing efforts change, based on segments defined by customer characteristics).

Originality/value

This research points to the myriad of factors that enhance positive and reduce negative word-of-mouth, and the importance of accounting for customer heterogeneity in assessing the likely impact of attitudinal drivers on word-of-mouth behaviors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Timothy L. Keiningham, Roland T. Rust, Bart Larivière, Lerzan Aksoy and Luke Williams

Many companies focus considerable resources on managing and enhancing positive word of mouth (WOM). WOM management, however, has become increasingly complex given the rise…

Abstract

Many companies focus considerable resources on managing and enhancing positive word of mouth (WOM). WOM management, however, has become increasingly complex given the rise of online channels and the corresponding increasing breadth of connections giving and receiving WOM. Given the generally believed importance of WOM to business outcomes, managers seek to leverage key drivers that they believe will enhance positive and minimize negative WOM.

Implicit in these actions is the belief that leveraging key drivers to enhance positive (or minimize negative) WOM results in generally positive outcomes across channels and connections. This research investigates whether this belief is correct. We examined WOM behaviors from over 15,000 consumers from 10 different countries in eight industry categories, as well as consumer attitudes toward the various brands investigated. Our findings indicate that efforts to enhance positive WOM typically have mixed effects – enhancing positive WOM in some channels while decreasing it (or even enhancing negative WOM) in other channels. Therefore, managers need to have a greater understanding of the complexity of leveraging attitudinal key drivers when seeking to enhance WOM to minimize potential negative outcomes.

Details

Marketing Accountability for Marketing and Non-marketing Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-563-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Roland T. Rust, Greg L. Stewart, Heather Miller and Debbie Pielack

Argues that employee turnover is highest among employees who are not satisfied with their jobs. Because qualified employees are becoming more scarce and difficult to…

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20557

Abstract

Argues that employee turnover is highest among employees who are not satisfied with their jobs. Because qualified employees are becoming more scarce and difficult to retain, organizations need to focus on increasing employee satisfaction. Suggests that one useful approach for increasing employee satisfaction is to view workers as customers. Based on the notion of employee as customer, illustrates how a customer satisfaction measurement approach can be applied to the measurement of employee attitudes. Suggests that the metaphor of employee as customer is indeed useful. Also demon‐strates how this approach yields actionable results that managers can implement to increase employee satisfaction and thereby retention.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Siddharth S. Singh and Dipak C. Jain

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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