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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

Roger Williams and Frank Sneath

It is suggested that, although accurate data is hard to come by, it is possible that redundancy amongst industrial executives is important because of its rate of incidence…

Abstract

It is suggested that, although accurate data is hard to come by, it is possible that redundancy amongst industrial executives is important because of its rate of incidence and the stress which it apparently can cause. This article is concerned primarily with the particular type of redundancy which results from an employee experiencing difficulty in successfully performing his job. In order to learn how to alleviate stress caused by this type of redundancy,it is suggested that we study other types of employees who have long been subject to redundancy and for whom it no longer poses such a threat. Such workers are often found in creative jobs, amongst some highly skilled professionals, and amongst those holding jobs requiring them to be very physically active. From studies of such individuals it is suggested that less stress is experienced by those who expect to be made redundant and also by those who find themselves in situations where they have little option and are forced to accept a high degree of change in their skills, abilities or values. If it was possible to predict redundancy then it would follow that much of the current anxiety could be removed from the situation by means of careful individual preparation. However, although the funtional areas most likely to be affected by redundancy are fairly clear, it is suggested that it is at the moment impossible for a variety of reasons to predict to any high degree of accuracy any single individual's likelihood of being made redundant. However, this inability to predict accurately is hardly an excuse for the questionable behaviour of most of the United Kingdom organizations when they are faced with having to divest themselves of some staff. Faced with such situations, organizations nearly always indulge in behaviour which has unwelcome effects both to the individuals concerned and upon the organization itself. Since these short‐term reactions are so dangerous and inadequate and since long‐term prediction of individual redundancy is so difficult, the only fair alternative is to prepare all who are at all likely to be affected by redundancy from as early a date as possible. The aims behind such a policy would be that the organization might have more information upon which to base its choice as to whom to make redundant and the individuals concerned should have as much opportunity as possible to choose their own courses of action. Four major steps are required in order to reach this state. Firstly, provision has to be made in the financial area, primarily through the re‐introduction of the concept of the explicit financial contract. Secondly, there needs to be the introduction of counselling of executives which would take into account their total life environment and not just their situation at work. Thirdly, there needs to be much greater provision of information about alternative sources of employment both within and without the organization. And fourthly, the concept of the ‘halfway house’ which has proved itself so useful in preparing employees for retirement, should be extended to encompass as well those who are likely to be faced with a change of career. Leaving the organization should not be a short sharp step any more than getting promotion is a short sharp step. It has to be prepared for on both the individual and the organization's sides. It is clearly difficult — this does not mean that it can be ignored.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Scott D. Roberts, Joe S. Anderson and Susan K. Williams

Russ Clark is a successful NAPA Auto Parts franchisee in Yuma County, Arizona. He sees opportunity in the neighboring Mexican city of San Luis Rıo Colorado. But crossing…

Abstract

Russ Clark is a successful NAPA Auto Parts franchisee in Yuma County, Arizona. He sees opportunity in the neighboring Mexican city of San Luis Rıo Colorado. But crossing the border with an after-market auto parts store will require building relationships with others, lots of learning to overcome the significant barriers, and some savvy decision-making in addition to the usual evaluation of business opportunities. Clark must consider a location decision, product mix, human resource issues, and how to promote the new business in an uncertain and unfamiliar context. Clearly, his current American business model will require a great degree of adaptation to make the venture a success. This case was developed from extensive field interviews and shadowing Mr. Clark for a day. In addition, Mr. Clark and his store manager, Rigoberto made classroom presentations describing their experiences surrounding the case situation.

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The CASE Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Peter Long

Details the increasing reliance on IT within organisations and its relationship to “world‐class quality”. Suggests IT is used to help automate tasks but can play a vital…

Abstract

Details the increasing reliance on IT within organisations and its relationship to “world‐class quality”. Suggests IT is used to help automate tasks but can play a vital role in human resource management. Examines how IT can be used to help recruit and retain employees by matching their skills to the appropriate job, beyond simply record‐keeping. Highlights ways a personnel system can be used to advantage in mapping out careers, health and safety and performance.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

H.N. Hirsch

This chapter argues that the theoretical core of the First Amendment can be found in the concept of disestablishment, and that the meaning of disestablishment can be, and…

Abstract

This chapter argues that the theoretical core of the First Amendment can be found in the concept of disestablishment, and that the meaning of disestablishment can be, and has been, extended from the religious sphere to the secular. It explores the historical development of rights of conscience and dissent, and the application of those rights to various changing historical circumstances, such as the development of political parties and the struggle over slavery. It then turns to an application of this analysis to several contemporary First Amendment controversies, including campaign finance and sexual expression.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-615-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Michael Warren Murphy

What insights might attending to the cyclical history of colonially imposed environmental change experienced by Indigenous peoples offer to critical intellectual projects…

Abstract

What insights might attending to the cyclical history of colonially imposed environmental change experienced by Indigenous peoples offer to critical intellectual projects concerned with race? How might our understanding of race shift if we took Indigenous peoples' concerns with the usurpation and transformation of land seriously? Motivated by these broader questions, in this chapter, I deploy an approach to the critical inquiry of race that I have tentatively been calling anticolonial environmental sociology. As a single iteration of the anticolonial environmental sociology of race, this chapter focuses on Native (American) perspectives on land and experiences with colonialism. I argue that thinking with Native conceptualizations of land forces us to confront the ecomateriality of race that so often escapes sight in conventional analyses. The chapter proceeds by first theorizing the ecomateriality of race by thinking with recent critical theorizing on colonial racialization, alongside Native conceptualizations of land. To further explicate this theoretical argument, I then turn to an historical excavation of the relations between settlers, Natives, and the land in Rhode Island that is organized according to spatiotemporal distinctions that punctuate Native land relations in this particular global region: the Reservation, the Plantation, and the Narragansett.

Details

Global Historical Sociology of Race and Racism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-219-6

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2010

Diane M. Harvey, Susan M. Bosco and Gregory Emanuele

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the presence of “green‐collar workers” in organizations, including whether their perception of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the presence of “green‐collar workers” in organizations, including whether their perception of the organization with regard to environmental activities would affect their willingness to recommend the employer to others. It also aims to analyse generational differences with regard to this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey developed from other research on green‐collar workers. It was distributed electronically and the data analysed using primarily χ2 and analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Findings

There were differences in knowledge levels regarding environmental topics such as the Kyoto treaty and the Green‐Collar Jobs Act. Significant correlations were also found among the variables of generation, willingness to recommend employer, and importance of school/workplace being environmentally friendly.

Research limitations/implications

The use of an online survey was a limitation due to the need for technology access to respond. Despite this limitation, subjects included sufficient members of all four generations to perform the analyzes.

Practical implications

Organizations that are trying to “go green” may well benefit from improved employee relations as a result. Employees who are interested in environmental issues will more likely recommend their companies to others when they feel the organization reflects their interest.

Originality/value

Other studies have not included gender or generational aspects of the issue of environmentalism in their work. This empirical study also investigates the relationship between organizations’ environmental activities, employee perceptions of the organization, and their willingness to recommend their company to others.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Richard A. Bernardi, Taylor L. Delande and Kimberly A. Zamojcin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the trends in accounting-education publications and the influence of journal rankings for authors from Australia, Canada, New…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the trends in accounting-education publications and the influence of journal rankings for authors from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors included the publications in ten accounting-education journals for the 20-year period from 1993 to 2012.

Findings

The data provide insights into the perceptions of accounting-education journals by authors from four countries. The authors found that, while the use of Accounting Education as a publication outlet for accounting authors from Australia and the UK was relatively stable, the use of Accounting Education as a publication outlet increased (decreased) for the accounting authors from New Zealand (Canada). The authors also found that, while coauthoring by the accounting authors from Australia and the UK increased slightly, coauthoring by the accounting authors from Canada and New Zealand increased during the 20-year period.

Research limitations/implications

The data suggests a tendency by the authors from these four countries to publish their accounting-education research in journals that had been ranked as a top accounting journal.

Originality/value

This paper is the first paper to consider trends in international accounting-education publications. The data in this research can be used by accounting faculty wishing to assess which journals their colleagues publish in most frequently.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Maria Cornachione Kula, Priniti Panday and Brandon Parrish

The purpose of this paper is to devise a new index of wellbeing that includes social and political in addition to economic factors. The new index seeks to assess a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to devise a new index of wellbeing that includes social and political in addition to economic factors. The new index seeks to assess a country's underlying “enabling environment” – the extent to which individuals are able to live as each chooses. Country rankings using this new measure (the HENX) are compared with the ranking of countries using the UN's popular indicators of development, the human development index and the HPI‐2.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the necessity of a new index, the subcomponents used in its construction, and the method of construction.

Findings

Country rankings are sensitive to which measure is used for the ranking. In particular, the USA and UK fare poorly when ranked by the HPI‐2 but their rankings improve dramatically when the HENX is used.

Originality/value

If a measure of the enabling environment of a country is deemed to be important as a measure of the wellbeing of citizens, and if political and social dimensions are deemed to be important to this environment, rankings of the most developed economies by the UN fail to adequately capture the countries' relative positions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Joseph Loersch and William Ross

The purpose of this paper is to describe a classroom negotiation exercise. A case involving controversy over the naming of a sports stadium containing a university…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a classroom negotiation exercise. A case involving controversy over the naming of a sports stadium containing a university football field and track is described. A local municipality, representing veterans groups, negotiates with university officials over a university plan to rename “Veteran's Memorial Stadium” after a recently‐retired football coach.

Design/methodology/approach

The negotiation activity is adapted from an actual case. It requires little advance preparation and can be used with either pairs or small groups of participants. “Teaching notes” provide instructions for using the activity.

Findings

The “Teaching Notes” examine how this controversy illustrates several concepts related to conflict, integrative bargaining, power and negotiating on behalf of constituents.

Originality/value

The case differs from many published cases in that one side's position is apparently rooted in values and matters of principle whereas the other side's position is interest‐based. The student must grapple with these dynamics, while seeking an integrative solution to the issues.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Jan Noeverman, Bas A.S. Koene and Roger Williams

This paper focuses on the need to revise the conceptualisation and measurement of evaluative style in future Reliance on Accounting Performance Measures (RAPM) research…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the need to revise the conceptualisation and measurement of evaluative style in future Reliance on Accounting Performance Measures (RAPM) research. Based on a review of the existing literature, we identify a number of issues in the conceptualisation and measurement of evaluative style and conclude that none of the existing measures is ideal for use in future research. We see two general dimensions of evaluative style that need specific attention in future research. The first dimension addresses the evaluative focus of the superior (e.g. budgets, other quantitative targets, short or long‐term targets, etc.). The second dimension addresses the superior’s way of handling the evaluation process (e.g. rigid or flexible, fixing blame, using it as a learning opportunity, etc.). Building on these two dimensions, there i a need for studies that assess how specific performance measures are used in different way within a particular organisational context, enabling a distinction between the design and the use of control tools. These conclusions suggest a need for qualitative indepth field studies within single organisations rather than quantitative survey research across organisations in future research on evaluative style and its behavioural consequences.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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