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1 – 10 of 417
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb055504. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb055504. When citing the article, please cite: Roger Stuart, (1984), “Using Others to Learn: Some Everyday Practice”, Personnel Review, Vol. 13 Iss: 4, pp. 13 - 19.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02683949610113593. When citing…

2792

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02683949610113593. When citing the article, please cite: John E. Thompson, Roger Stuart, Philip R. Lindsay, (1996), “The competence of top team members: A framework for successful performance”, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 11 Iss: 3, pp. 48 - 66.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb055353. When citing the…

312

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb055353. When citing the article, please cite: John Burgoyne, Roger Stuart, (1978), “Teaching and Learning Methods in Management Development”, Personnel Review, Vol. 7 Iss: 1, pp. 53 - 58.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1977

Roger Stuart and John Burgoyne

In this paper, we are concerned with the skills required to transform theories of learning into practice. Research data will be described which identify a range of…

Abstract

In this paper, we are concerned with the skills required to transform theories of learning into practice. Research data will be described which identify a range of teaching skills and which start to differentiate the relative importance of different skills in implementing different learning theories.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

14239

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Roger Stuart

This is the second of a two‐part article describing acharacterisation of stress based on a stress continuum. Part 1 provideda holistic description of the full range of…

Abstract

This is the second of a two‐part article describing a characterisation of stress based on a stress continuum. Part 1 provided a holistic description of the full range of individuals′ startle reactions and stressed responses. Part 2 describes the emergence of stress characters, links these characters to the stressors that prompt them and the effects they produce, and considers the methodological implications of the frameworks for those wishing to help alleviate individuals′ stress. Overall, the article develops the original stress story towards one which matches, and beyond that serves to integrate and provide a rationale for, the full qualitative diversity of individuals′ stress.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

George Long and Roger Stuart

The first part of this article concluded with an intention to pursue the implications for action of adopting a marketing perspective on training. In this second part, we…

Abstract

The first part of this article concluded with an intention to pursue the implications for action of adopting a marketing perspective on training. In this second part, we propose, then, to consider, firstly, the practical consequences of marketing training as a service rather than a good. Following this, we will explore more widely a framework for these and other marketing decisions that a training professional may assemble, organise and implement towards marketing his/her training function.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

Roger Stuart and Don Binsted

This paper is the final part of a trilogy focusing upon the reality dimensions in management learning event designs. In the first paper a number of models were developed…

Abstract

This paper is the final part of a trilogy focusing upon the reality dimensions in management learning event designs. In the first paper a number of models were developed which lend greater understanding to the design of reality into learning events and the implications for participants' subsequent learning. The second paper considered the application of these models to designs specifically aimed at producing high reality learning events. In all, six broad types of strategy were identified, each of which prescribed tactics leading to a perceived high reality for the learner. The focus upon high reality was in line with the authors' thinking that there needs to be a much stronger base in reality than that which is perceived in many management learning events currently mounted as part of management development activities in this country. Nevertheless, as discussed in the first paper, there are situations where low reality learning activities are appropriate.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Philip R. Lindsay and Roger Stuart

In the face of increasingly demanding business environments, organizations must carefully examine themselves to assess their “fitness” to compete and sustain success…

1342

Abstract

In the face of increasingly demanding business environments, organizations must carefully examine themselves to assess their “fitness” to compete and sustain success within their marketplaces. Such assessments lead senior management to challenge previously held beliefs about what is meant by “competence” and to reconstrue them in the light of future requirements. Managerial competences can help managers address this task. However, many competence approaches to organizational competence and change seem too narrowly focused and static in nature. Senior managers require models which cater for the dynamism of their business world. Outlines the framework identified by Stuart and Lindsay (1996). Illustrates its use in helping managers to systematically explore change requirements to achieve “competence” through a client assignment. Indicates how outputs from application of the framework inform and strengthen the development of HR systems and processes to support change in pursuit of organizational competence.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Roger Stuart

Describes research into managers′ experiences of significantorganizational change attempts. The research project was aimed atdeveloping frameworks which: describe…

5321

Abstract

Describes research into managers′ experiences of significant organizational change attempts. The research project was aimed at developing frameworks which: describe, illuminate and enable a better understanding of managers′ journeys through organizational change; serve as a template for bringing together the very diverse and fragmented literature relating to individuals experiencing change; highlight issues and pointers for the design and facilitation of effective organizational change initiatives. The first part describes the context, spirit, intentions, sample and methodology of the research. Also, reviews a broad range of literature which can inform our understanding of individuals in change. Propounds the need to open up the “real world” of organizational change, as perceived and experienced by managers, rather than any “ideal” view of how that world is desired or supposed to be. Presents and discusses research findings on the sensed and initiating “primary” triggers for change‐that is, the formal and communicated organizational change objectives; and the perceived and felt “secondary” triggers for change‐that is, the issues raised by, and the implications of, the organizational changes for individual managers. The second part presents a framework depicting the phases and components of managers′ journeys through organizational change. On the framework, the experience of managers can be located, in terms of their thoughts, feelings and behaviours, as the processes of change unfold. While each manager′s journey was found to be unique, the framework proved to be ubiquitous in enabling the mapping of all the managers′ journeys, and it also accommodates literature on phenomena as diverse as learning, personal transition, catastrophe and survival, trauma and stress, loss and “death”, and worry and grief. The findings emphasize the profoundness and deeply felt emotionality of many managers′ experiencing of change in organizations. Finally, identifies the outcomes of managers′ journeys through significant attempts at organizational change. Also presents the reported helping and hindering factors to those journeys. Implications of these findings are pursued, particularly in terms of the leadership and development roles and behaviours required, if the organization and its management are to move beyond simply requiring change towards actively facilitating its achievement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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