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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Roger L. Tyler

One of the aspects of being in the consultancy business is that we have to do forecasting for our living. As somebody once said, ‘forecasting is fine when it comes to talking…

Abstract

One of the aspects of being in the consultancy business is that we have to do forecasting for our living. As somebody once said, ‘forecasting is fine when it comes to talking about the present, but the future gets a little bit more difficult’.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Roger L. Tyler

The Electronica Show in Munich has ended and the Pronic Exhibition in Paris is now a thing of the past. As I write this article we are on the run‐up to Christmas and the days are…

Abstract

The Electronica Show in Munich has ended and the Pronic Exhibition in Paris is now a thing of the past. As I write this article we are on the run‐up to Christmas and the days are getting shorter and colder. A year ago I went to press with an article called ‘Towards a Busier 1988’ and it seems that many of the predictions made in that article have come to pass. Across the world of printed circuits (I hesitate to say ‘circuit world’ for obvious reasons) the industry has seen healthy growth in most of the major world economies. The United States has enjoyed some significant increases in activity with both the board shops and the laminators working hard to keep up with the predicted increases in demand which came through in the earlier months of the year.

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Circuit World, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Roger L. Tyler

This article is being drafted virtually on the eve of the Productronica Show in Munich. By the time it comes to press, the electronics world will have converged on that beautiful…

Abstract

This article is being drafted virtually on the eve of the Productronica Show in Munich. By the time it comes to press, the electronics world will have converged on that beautiful city, gone through the expensive and invigorating process of ‘setting up shop’ in the Munich Exhibition grounds and returned home to face the winter and prepare for the rigours of 1988. It would be interesting to calculate the number of millions of passenger miles that will be travelled by the participants in visiting Productronica and the total costs to the electronics world of this massive event. It obviously goes far beyond the superficial costs of all the exhibition stands, hotel bills and air fares which go towards it and must represent a massive investment for the industry worldwide.

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Circuit World, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Roger L. Tyler

Midnight December 31, 1999, will be quite an occasion. It will start its journey round the world at the International Date Line somewhere out in the Pacific and then travel…

Abstract

Midnight December 31, 1999, will be quite an occasion. It will start its journey round the world at the International Date Line somewhere out in the Pacific and then travel westwards, pulling the year 2000 behind it. As it scurries across the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, this point of time will be the trigger for a multitude of ceremonies and celebrations as the century and millennium draw to a close and the next thousand years begin. In Trafalgar, Times and maybe Tiananmen Square people will greet the year 2000 with excitement, hope and perhaps some trepidation as the clocks strike midnight to welcome in the New Year.

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Circuit World, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Roger L. Tyler

In my previous article ‘At the Bottom of the Trough’ which was published in this journal in January, I suggested that a general upturn would be delayed until the late Spring/early…

Abstract

In my previous article ‘At the Bottom of the Trough’ which was published in this journal in January, I suggested that a general upturn would be delayed until the late Spring/early Summer of 1986. At the time of writing this report in early June, the signs are that the return to viability has started in the UK. Companies both large and small are indicating improved order books and a general sense of optimism is beginning to return. It will be some time before this order flow becomes converted into actual production (with average lead times of about 6–8 weeks in the industry, the accelerated order flow will be some 1–2 months in coming through). At the same time, if increased orders means the hiring of extra people, then further delays may take place before the bottle‐necks are cleared and the product starts to be shipped.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

PCB manufacturers worldwide are anxiously watching for signs of the up turn. In most countries of the Western world there has been some degree of down turn which has varied from…

Abstract

PCB manufacturers worldwide are anxiously watching for signs of the up turn. In most countries of the Western world there has been some degree of down turn which has varied from the ferocious, as felt by many companies in the United States, to the relatively mild experiences of some of the Western European nations. Japan's originally forecast increase in PCB activity has not been fulfilled this year and the South East Asian countries have suffered as a result of the down turn in the US economy.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

The late Summer and Autumn of 1986 saw a slow but steady climb for the printed circuit industry as it moved away from the trough of 1985 into better times. With the Summer…

Abstract

The late Summer and Autumn of 1986 saw a slow but steady climb for the printed circuit industry as it moved away from the trough of 1985 into better times. With the Summer holidays well behind us, the PCB economy has now settled down and is showing signs of returning to slow growth by the early Spring of 1987.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1982

Legal process by its very nature cannot be swift; step by step, it must be steady and sure and this takes time. There is no room for hasty decisions for these would tend to defeat…

Abstract

Legal process by its very nature cannot be swift; step by step, it must be steady and sure and this takes time. There is no room for hasty decisions for these would tend to defeat its purpose. Time, however, is of the essence and this is set for various aspects of legal action by limitation of actions legislation, which sets periods after which the case is no longer actionable. The periods are adequate and in civil law, generous to avoid injustice being done. The one serious complaint against the process of law, however, is the unwarrantable delays which are possible despite limitation. From the far‐off days of Equity, when Dickens' Jarndyce v Jarndyce, caricatured and exaggerated as it was, described the scene down to the present when delays, often spoken of in Court as outrageous are encountered, to say nothing of the crowded lists in the High Courts and Crown Courts; the result of the state of society and not the fault of the judiciary. Early in 1980, it was reported that 14,500 cases were awaiting trial in the Southeastern Circuit Crown Court alone. Outside the Courts legal work hangs on, to the annoyance of those concerned; from house purchase to probate. Here, the solicitor is very much his own master, unhampered by statutory time limits and the only recourse a client has is to change this solicitor, with no certainty that there will be any improvement, or appeal to the Law Society.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2017

Bernard P. Perlmutter

In this chapter, I examine stories that foster care youth tell to legislatures, courts, policymakers, and the public to influence policy decisions. The stories told by these…

Abstract

In this chapter, I examine stories that foster care youth tell to legislatures, courts, policymakers, and the public to influence policy decisions. The stories told by these children are analogized to victim truth testimony, analyzed as a therapeutic, procedural, and developmental process, and examined as a catalyst for systemic accountability and change. Youth stories take different forms and appear in different media: testimony in legislatures, courts, research surveys or studies; opinion editorials and interviews in newspapers or blog posts; digital stories on YouTube; and artistic expression. Lawyers often serve as conduits for youth storytelling, translating their clients’ stories to the public. Organized advocacy by youth also informs and animates policy development. One recent example fosters youth organizing to promote “normalcy” in child welfare practices in Florida, and in related federal legislation.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-344-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen

The purpose of this paper is to identify personal and work environment factors associated with the experience of job content plateauing among older workers.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify personal and work environment factors associated with the experience of job content plateauing among older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two cross‐sectional studies, each including two samples, were conducted. In each study, one sample consisted of a diverse group of older workers and the other sample was composed of older nurses.

Findings

Work centrality and learning self‐efficacy were significantly negatively related to job content plateauing especially for older managerial and professional employees. Perceived organizational support and perceived respect from the organization, supervisor, and work group members were significantly negatively related to job content plateauing for both the diverse group of older workers and older nurses.

Research limitations/implications

The average level of job content plateauing was below the scale midpoint, suggesting older workers who are most susceptible to job content plateauing may have already exited the labor force. Future research is needed to identify variables that mediate the relationship between personal and work environment factors and job content plateauing.

Practical implications

Employers need to ensure that older workers with high work centrality and learning self‐efficacy are provided with challenging jobs that foster learning new skills. Equally important is to signal to older workers that they are valued and respected through HR practices targeted at older employees and respectful treatment from their supervisor and work group members.

Originality/value

This paper identifies personal and work environment factors not previously examined in relation to job content plateauing with a specific focus on older workers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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