Search results

1 – 10 of 45
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Roger J. Sandilands

Reproduces the main texts of hitherto unpublished reminiscences of the style and influence, as a teacher, of Allyn Abbott Young (1876‐1929) by 17 of his distinguished…

Abstract

Reproduces the main texts of hitherto unpublished reminiscences of the style and influence, as a teacher, of Allyn Abbott Young (1876‐1929) by 17 of his distinguished students. They include Bertil Ohlin, Nicholas Kaldor, James Angell, Lauchlin Currie, Colin Clark, Howard Ellis, Frank Fetter, Earl Hamilton, and Melvin Knight (brother of Frank Knight who, with Edward Chamberlin, was perhaps Young’s most famous PhD student). There has recently been a revival of interest in Young’s influence on US monetary thought and in his theory of economic growth based on endogenous increasing returns. These recollections of his students (addressed to Young’s biographer, Charles Blitch) shed light on why Young has, at least until recently, been renowned more for his massive erudition than for his published writings.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Introduces the special issue to mark the 10th anniversary of Lauchlin Currie's death. Currie was an economist described as the intellectual leader of the spending wing of…

Abstract

Introduces the special issue to mark the 10th anniversary of Lauchlin Currie's death. Currie was an economist described as the intellectual leader of the spending wing of Roosevelt's New Deal.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Roger J. Sandilands

Allyn Young′s lectures, as recorded by the young Nicholas Kaldor,survey the historical roots of the subject from Aristotle through to themodern neo‐classical writers. The…

Abstract

Allyn Young′s lectures, as recorded by the young Nicholas Kaldor, survey the historical roots of the subject from Aristotle through to the modern neo‐classical writers. The focus throughout is on the conditions making for economic progress, with stress on the institutional developments that extend and are extended by the size of the market. Organisational changes that promote the division of labour and specialisation within and between firms and industries, and which promote competition and mobility, are seen as the vital factors in growth. In the absence of new markets, inventions as such play only a minor role. The economic system is an inter‐related whole, or a living “organon”. It is from this perspective that micro‐economic relations are analysed, and this helps expose certain fallacies of composition associated with the marginal productivity theory of production and distribution. Factors are paid not because they are productive but because they are scarce. Likewise he shows why Marshallian supply and demand schedules, based on the “one thing at a time” approach, cannot adequately describe the dynamic growth properties of the system. Supply and demand cannot be simply integrated to arrive at a picture of the whole economy. These notes are complemented by eleven articles in the Encyclopaedia Britannica which were published shortly after Young′s sudden death in 1929.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

The author, Lauchlin Currie, suggests, in a memorandum written in February 1937, that there should be banking legislation with reference to foreign capital inflows. Gives…

Abstract

The author, Lauchlin Currie, suggests, in a memorandum written in February 1937, that there should be banking legislation with reference to foreign capital inflows. Gives a series of suggestions as to what might be needed.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Presents a letter written by Lauchlin Currie in 1934 to the then President of the USA Roosevelt, praising his monetary policy and also offering advice.

Abstract

Presents a letter written by Lauchlin Currie in 1934 to the then President of the USA Roosevelt, praising his monetary policy and also offering advice.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Presents the monthly estimates of the Federal Government in the USA from 1932‐1937. States that in 1937 the contribution has declined below the levels of the other recent…

Abstract

Presents the monthly estimates of the Federal Government in the USA from 1932‐1937. States that in 1937 the contribution has declined below the levels of the other recent years, reflecting in part a decrease in expenditures but more largely an increase in tax receipts. Investigates how the contribution was measured and its significance. Examines the significance of the 1937 decline in contribution and proposes that there may be a decrement to buying power in the first half of 1938.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Presents a memorandum written by Lauchlin Currie in December 1940 to the President of the USA on the subject of expansion possibilities of the US monetary system.

Abstract

Presents a memorandum written by Lauchlin Currie in December 1940 to the President of the USA on the subject of expansion possibilities of the US monetary system.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Roger J. Sandilands

Henry George's fame in the fields of economics, politics and literature rests largely on his powerful book, Progress and Poverty, first published in 1879. The centenary of…

Abstract

Henry George's fame in the fields of economics, politics and literature rests largely on his powerful book, Progress and Poverty, first published in 1879. The centenary of this event sparked a modest revival of interest in George's work among academic economists, including a special session devoted to him at the December 1979 American Economics Association meetings in Atlanta. Generally, however, his work has been neglected by twentieth‐century economists and, as Robert Heilbroner (1969) remarked, he is cast as a member of the economics “underworld”. If any economics undergraduate has heard his name it is usually through a passing reference in a first‐year textbook to the Single Tax Movement. The impression is then given by the text that George was a single‐issue fanatic. The student is told that a tax on land rents is theoretically interesting and that it would have no disincentive effects but that it is either impractical to separate land from improvements or that rents are not sufficiently important to warrant much attention to them as a major source of government finance.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Presents memorandum in the form of a list of Lauchin Currie's ideas on changes to the Federal Reserve System that he thought were necessary.

Abstract

Presents memorandum in the form of a list of Lauchin Currie's ideas on changes to the Federal Reserve System that he thought were necessary.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Presents a memorandum from Lauchlin Currie to the President of the USA written in March 1940 in which he discusses full employment and the New Deal.

Abstract

Presents a memorandum from Lauchlin Currie to the President of the USA written in March 1940 in which he discusses full employment and the New Deal.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

1 – 10 of 45