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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Jeffrey B. Schmidt

As a high school senior, there was no doubt I wanted to attend college, it was just a matter of where. I applied to only two universities – Oakland University (OU) and…

Abstract

As a high school senior, there was no doubt I wanted to attend college, it was just a matter of where. I applied to only two universities – Oakland University (OU) and MSU. I was not too familiar with MSU, but it had a good reputation; I was much more familiar with Oakland. Although I had obtained an application for the University of Michigan (UM), I decided that the UM application was just too long to complete. And what the heck is a wolverine anyway? I lived in Michigan for most of my life, and I had never spotted this mythical rodent. As a tendency, I always found Michigan students and alumni to be either too arrogant or eccentric for my taste. Also, at that time of my life, I found the atmosphere in Ann Arbor not right in some way, so I applied to only two universities.1

Details

Michigan State University Contributions to International Business and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-440-5

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02651339610131414. When citing…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02651339610131414. When citing the article, please cite: Steven R. Clinton, Roger J. Calantone, (1996), “Logistics strategy: does it travel well?”, International Marketing Review, Vol. 13 Iss: 5, pp. 98 - 112.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Geoffrey L. Gordon, Roger J. Calantone, C. Anthony di Benedetto, Geoffrey L. Gordon, Roger J. Calantone and C. Anthony di Benedetto

Posits a stagewise learning process involved in the building ofbrand equity: brand birth; the creation of brand awareness andassociations; the building of quality and…

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Abstract

Posits a stagewise learning process involved in the building of brand equity: brand birth; the creation of brand awareness and associations; the building of quality and value perceptions; the emergence of brand loyalty; and the launching of brand extensions. Also reports on an empirical study which explored the evolution, existence and extensibility of brand equity in a particular business‐to‐business market. Concludes with practical implications for managers in business‐to‐business product or service firms.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Nukhet Harmancioglu, Cornelia Droge and Roger J. Calantone

This study aims to scrutinize the meaning and domain of “innovation” by providing an extensive theory‐driven review of the new product literature in marketing, management…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to scrutinize the meaning and domain of “innovation” by providing an extensive theory‐driven review of the new product literature in marketing, management and engineering. The overall objective is to classify the recent literature on innovation and to illustrate theoretically derived discourses in the study of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper organizes this literature by providing typologies of discourses, which define innovation. Based on our review of 238 articles from a comprehensive set of journals publishing innovation research, we propose a theoretical divide in the innovation literature.

Findings

Theoretical underpinnings, namely adoption/diffusion theory versus the resource‐based/contingency theory view, form one dimension of the typology. Jointly considered with the other two dimensions – level of analysis and customer vs firm perspective – a framework is formed of the different discourses and conceptualisations in the innovation literature.

Originality/value

Past researchers have always proposed a definition of innovation that was embedded in a typology of innovation types; in contrast, the paper allows the theoretical discourses to unveil meanings of innovation and associated constructs (and hence it starts with theory specification, not construct definition). It argues for starting with theory as the basic division and proposes a theory driven typology. Through its theoretical genesis, the paper wishes to create a shared understanding among academics and practitioners of what constitutes innovation and constructs within the related theoretical net.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Serdar S. Durmusoglu and Roger J. Calantone

The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analytic review based on a theoretical framework developed for investigating new product development (NPD) teams in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analytic review based on a theoretical framework developed for investigating new product development (NPD) teams in the first two decades of the research stream.

Design/methodology/approach

This study contributes to literature by investigating the presence of publication bias and synthesizing correlation effect sizes of 27 factors influencing three NPD team performance dimensions: overall, market-based (e.g. sales, profitability), process-based (e.g. budget adherence, schedule adherence) outcomes. Further, this study presents a path analytical model that uses the aggregate study effects to identify significant drivers of NPD team performance.

Findings

First, examination of extant literature shows no publication bias. Next, analyses show that three internal team dynamic variables have the most significant positive effect on overall NPD team performance: team member job satisfaction, cross-functional integration and superordinate identity. For market-based performance, three goal-related contextual factors exert the most positive influence, namely, goal stability, goal clarity and goal support, in respective order. Further, for process-based performance, cross-functional integration’s strong positive effect is followed by team and goal stability. Moreover, physical distance, interpersonal and task conflict have significant negative effects on NPD team performance. Finally, both market- and process-based NPD team performance are significantly influenced by NPD team’s cohesion, which acts a mediator between two contextual factors: physical distance and team tenure.

Research limitations/implications

This meta-analysis contributes to literature by providing a comprehensive model of NPD team performance predictors, their definitions, along with their corresponding effects in predicting performance. While team cohesion is found to be a strong predictor of both market- and process-based performance, future research can examine if too much cohesion has a detrimental effect, especially on market-based performance.

Practical implications

The results assist managers in shifting their priorities to ensure optimal support of NPD teams. For example, team leadership competence externally has a larger effect on overall performance compared to team leadership for internal team dynamics. Hence, team leaders should make sure that they manage the team’s relationships with external parties (e.g. other functional units) with more caution.

Originality/value

This study provides a guiding framework for analyzing NPD team performance as well as identifies and then addresses many knowledge gaps on NPD team performance.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Alma Mintu‐Wimsatt and Roger J. Calantone

The interdependence of economies has led many researchers to examine whether US business practices are universal. Various models and scenarios have been investigated in an…

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Abstract

The interdependence of economies has led many researchers to examine whether US business practices are universal. Various models and scenarios have been investigated in an attempt to further understand foreign business counterparts. This paper utilizes a previously developed US‐based model on the problem‐solving approach in negotiation and tests its applicability among Canadian industrial exporters. The authors found that the sample’s problem‐solving orientation was highly influenced by two sets of factors: individual as well as organizational factors. Consequently, it seems that within the context of the problem‐solving orientation, Canadian exporters share similar patterns of behavior to those of their US counterparts.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Malika Chaudhuri, Jay Janney and Roger J. Calantone

March’s 1991 work on exploitation and exploration has been studied in many different industries. The purpose of this paper is to analyze signals emanating from exploration…

Abstract

Purpose

March’s 1991 work on exploitation and exploration has been studied in many different industries. The purpose of this paper is to analyze signals emanating from exploration and exploitation alliances within the pharmaceutical industry context. Specifically, the authors explore market reactions to announcements of alliance formations based not only on alliance type but also in terms of their marketing intensity and leverage.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a two-stage event-study market model using a two-day event window (event days 0, +1), creating cumulative abnormal returns (CARs). In the second stage, the authors regress the CARs against an array of control and explanatory variables.

Findings

Findings suggest that even though firm announcements of exploration and exploitation formations initially generate favorable market reactions, the former has a greater impact on CAR relative to the latter. Furthermore, leverage and marketing intensity moderate the relationship between firms’ alliance formation announcements and CARs generated. In particular, firms’ alliance formation announcements generate relatively greater market reactions at lower (higher) levels of the firm’s leverage (market intensity).

Research limitations/implications

Event studies are valuable for gauging initial impressions of management action, but they are not meant to address long-term value creation. While market reactions suggest the likelihood of an alliance’s success or failure, managers also assess the risk to a firm’s financial health should the alliance fail. As a result, announcements that signal the firm has discretionary capabilities to ameliorate the effect of a failed alliance are better received.

Originality/value

This study is the first to analyze the stock market’s perception and valuation of different types of risk, classified by exploration vs exploitation alliances. The study also contributes to the literature by analyzing how investors use the information about a firm’s financial leverage and marketing activities to fine-tune their valuation of different types of risk-taking activities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Roger J. Calantone and C. Anthony Di Benedetto

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interaction of pricing strategies with other aspects of launch, in particular, timing, logistics/inventory strategy, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interaction of pricing strategies with other aspects of launch, in particular, timing, logistics/inventory strategy, and coordination with support organizations, and the effect on profit and competitive performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an empirical study of 215 recent new product launches, focusing on pricing and other strategic and tactical launch decisions and the resulting profitability and competitive performance. Clusters of new product launches are identified and the profitability and competitiveness of each cluster are discussed.

Findings

The paper finds that some clusters are related to greater success than others. The most profitable and competitively successful cluster contained launches supported by solid market research and marked by good timing decisions. By contrast, the least profitable/successful cluster were higher price launches unsupported by adequate research.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the fact that the sampling frame is made up of members of a professional association of product development and management, and may therefore be more representative of “best practice” in new product development (NPD) than of NPD in general. The authors believe the use of the key informant method is justified in this study, however this method has been criticized in the past.

Originality/value

The pricing decision for a new product is sometimes oversimplified as a “high‐low” or “skimming versus penetration” choice. The study finds that the actual effect of pricing on ultimate success is much more complex, and that one must consider not only price level, but also the timing of the launch, the logistics and inventory strategy, the extent of market research, testing, and planning, and so forth.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Roger J. Calantone and Victor Raj

Expert systems are computer systems, built through interaction with actual experts, that mimic human experts within a narrow domain. This paper describes the development…

Abstract

Expert systems are computer systems, built through interaction with actual experts, that mimic human experts within a narrow domain. This paper describes the development of an expert system, NEWPRODEX, designed to screen industrial product concepts, identify potential financial successes, and diagnose opportunities for concept enhancement to improve its chances of success on the international marketplace. A running example illustrating a sample application of the NEWPRODEX system is provided. The concluding section discusses directions for model improvement.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Geoffrey L. Gordon, Roger J. Calantone and C. Anthony di Benedetto

Business‐to‐business service marketing has received comparativelyless attention in the academic literature than business‐to‐businessproduct marketing; much of the service…

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Abstract

Business‐to‐business service marketing has received comparatively less attention in the academic literature than business‐to‐business product marketing; much of the service marketing literature discusses the ways in which services and products are different. Compares service marketing to product marketing in the industrial sector from the perspective of customer value creation. Results of a study of managers in the telecommunications industry provide some insight into criteria used by customers to evaluate services and products. According to the results, more similarities than differences exist between service and product marketing in the industrial sector. Managerial implications of this finding are presented.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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