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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2020

Roger Clarke, Robert M. Davison and Wanying Jia

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of “researcher perspective” in articles published in the AIS Basket of 8 journals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of “researcher perspective” in articles published in the AIS Basket of 8 journals.

Design/methodology/approach

Purposive sampling: descriptive analysis of 659 articles published in three complete years of each of the eight leading journals (2001, 2008, 2015).

Findings

When observing phenomena, IS researchers mostly adopt the perspective of one of the stakeholders in the activities, commonly that of the sponsor of the information system that is in focus. 96% of relevant articles adopted a single-perspective approach, and 93% of those were oriented towards the system sponsor.

Research limitations/implications

The discipline has not been exploiting opportunities to deliver greater value firstly through the adoption of perspectives other than that of the system sponsor, and secondly through dual- and multi-perspective research. Further, the ignoring of the viewpoints of other stakeholders is inconsistent with the requirements of the recently-adopted AIS Code of Ethics.

Practical implications

The dominance of single-perspective/system-sponsor-viewpoint research greatly constrains the benefits that IS research can deliver to IS practitioners and to the world at large.

Originality/value

The authors are not aware of any prior investigation into the nature of researcher perspective. We contend that an appreciation of the current bias is essential if IS research is to adapt, and thereby make far more useful contributions to practice.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Roger Wythe

Looks at how to make TQM works in the service sector. Asserts that what varies is how the message is communicated and the activities controlled. Looks at how to make the…

Abstract

Looks at how to make TQM works in the service sector. Asserts that what varies is how the message is communicated and the activities controlled. Looks at how to make the process of change to TQM effective. Asserts there has to be an audit of satisfaction of those who deal with the company at all levels. Contends organizational politics are an essential part of the process as key choices have to be made. Asserts that TQ presents the possibility of a more effective customer‐focused organization driving down failure and appraisal costs, and driving out waste. Asserts what is needed is a straightforward improvement process all can own. Concludes that what matters is how effectively everyone is presented with the challenge and encouraged to work it through in the circumstances of their own jobs.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Roger Clarke

Many long‐standing technologies embody the ability to locate and track people. During the last couple of decades of the twentieth century, new technologies have been…

Abstract

Many long‐standing technologies embody the ability to locate and track people. During the last couple of decades of the twentieth century, new technologies have been developed which greatly increase those capabilities. The nature of these technologies is described, and the processes identified whereby they are being applied to the serious detriment of civil freedoms. Implications are drawn for technology‐using organisations, for technology providers, for standards developers, for policy makers, and for privacy and data protection commissioners.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Roger Clarke

– The purpose of this paper is to document the development path of a specific concept during its first 20 years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the development path of a specific concept during its first 20 years.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence was extracted of the citation-counts of relevant articles, uses of the term in other articles that do not cite the original articles, and uses of terms with similar meanings. Examination of the data took into account insights from epidemiology, memetics and diffusion of innovations theory.

Findings

The concept has had insufficient impact to overcome the weaknesses in theory and practice that it was intended to address. It has lacked champions. It has proven to be sufficiently fit to survive, but not to flourish.

Research limitations/implications

Google Scholar has a wide catchment area, and hence provides a basis for tracking the path of development of new ideas. However, the tools remain fairly blunt, and do not, for example, enable efficient extraction of patterns of citation over time, or the nature of the uses made of terms by the citing articles.

Practical implications

Neologisms take on a life of their own, losing the associations that they were intended to have with other ideas, and shedding their embedment in a body of theory. For a new term to successfully project a meme, its proponent must enthuse a critical mass of early adopters to apply it, and to generate a further round of adopters.

Originality/value

Concepts are seldom tracked over time. This paper shows that a new term and its associated body of theory require more than publications in top-level journals if they are to have significant impacts on academic research and industry practice.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Roger Clarke

Computer matching is a mass surveillance technique involving thecomparison of data about many people, which have been acquired frommultiple sources. Its use offers…

Abstract

Computer matching is a mass surveillance technique involving the comparison of data about many people, which have been acquired from multiple sources. Its use offers potential benefits, particularly financial savings. It is also error‐prone, and its power results in threats to established patterns and values. The imperatives of efficiency and equity demand that computer matching be used, and the information privacy interest demands that it be used only where justified, and be subjected to effective controls. Provides background to this important technique, including its development and application in the USA and in Australia, and a detailed technical description. Contends that the technique, its use, and controls over its use are very important issues which demand research. Computing, telecommunications and robotics artefacts which have the capacity to change society radically need to be subjected to early and careful analysis, not only by sociologists, lawyers and philosophers, but also by information technologists themselves.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Roger Clarke

In this article a generalisation of the Cournot oligopoly model is discussed, and it is shown that seemingly myopic conjectural behaviour is in fact in the (combined…

Abstract

In this article a generalisation of the Cournot oligopoly model is discussed, and it is shown that seemingly myopic conjectural behaviour is in fact in the (combined) interests of the market participants.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Philip DesAutels, Pierre Berthon, Albert Caruana and Leyland F. Pitt

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impact that country connectedness and cultural values have on the equity afforded to a country’s workforce in today’s global…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impact that country connectedness and cultural values have on the equity afforded to a country’s workforce in today’s global economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon a number of large international surveys of national-level metrics, e-readiness is identified as a proxy measure for country connectedness. Cultural variables are proxied by the World Values Survey’s national-level scores on “survival/self-expression” and “traditional/secular-rational” values. Workforce equity is captured via three measures: per capita Gross National Income (GNI) based on purchasing power parity (PPP), a Gini-coefficient, and the prevalence of child labor. Stepwise regression analysis is employed to investigate expected relationships.

Findings

Results suggest an interesting link between the constructs investigated. A negative and significant effect of e-readiness and a negative and significant effect of traditional/secular-rational values on workforce equity are reported. In addition, the impact of e-readiness appears to be absolutely larger while thee impact of survival/self-expression values on the workforce equity is not found to be significant.

Research limitations/implications

The research is primarily exploratory in nature thereby providing a foundation but not an end product. Next, the data used in the research is aggregate-level data providing broad generalizations about each country. Does a country have a single culture? Is the connectivity of a country a valid measure of the regions within? The authors chose to use an analysis at a single point in time. A longitudinal study could provide more insight and thus help to highlight causality. The data utilized was repurposed from third-party sources. Finally, only 37 observations are used and a broader data set could help strengthen findings further.

Social implications

The rapid march of country connectedness across the globe is eroding firms’ ability to shade their actions through the distance afforded by global supply chains. A country’s culture values has a significant impact on workforce equity but country connectedness has a stronger impact, thus companies operating in more traditional and less developed countries will face significant impacts as these countries get connected. Rather than a threat, companies may see country connectedness and workforce equity as an opportunity. Firms that treat their workers well will see vast new markets open for them as evermore of the world’s population becomes economically active.

Originality/value

Uses an innovative data capture methodology that allows the investigation of an interesting and unexplored research question.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Jennifer Copley, Dan Johnson and Stella Bain

To consider the power of psychological well-being, empathy and coping style in predicting staff attitudes towards young people in looked after accommodation, involved in…

Abstract

Purpose

To consider the power of psychological well-being, empathy and coping style in predicting staff attitudes towards young people in looked after accommodation, involved in or at risk of offending behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to understand more about staff attitudes which have a significant role in the care and rehabilitation of this client group.

Design/methodology/approach

Psychological well-being, empathy and coping style are discussed in terms of their impact on attitudes towards young people. The predictive power of each factor is considered using multiple regression analysis of participants’ responses on an adapted version of the Attitudes to Prisoners (ATP) scale, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and the Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ).

Findings

Multiple regression analyses showed that empathic concern (affective empathy) was the only factor predictive of attitudes towards young people. The paper discusses the applied implications for employers, including the possibility of empathy training for staff members and highlights the need for further consideration of the factors impacting on staff attitudes.

Practical implications

The outcome suggests that empathy may serve as a protective factor against the development of negative attitudes. This highlights the importance of fostering staff empathy and the possible use of empathy training.

Originality/value

The research findings question the robustness of the relationships between staff psychological well-being, empathy, coping styles and attitudes towards their client group. The outcome suggests that empathy may serve as a protective factor against the development of negative attitudes.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Roger Clarke

Many information systems involve data about people. In order reliably toassociate data with particular individuals, it is necessary that aneffective and efficient…

Abstract

Many information systems involve data about people. In order reliably to associate data with particular individuals, it is necessary that an effective and efficient identification scheme be established and maintained. There is remarkably little in the information technology literature concerning human identification. Seeks to overcome that deficiency by undertaking a survey of human identity and human identification. Discusses techniques including names, codes, knowledge‐based and token‐based identification, and biometrics. Identifies the key challenge to management as being to devise a scheme which is practicable and economic, and of sufficiently high integrity to address the risks the organization confronts in its dealings with people. Proposes that much greater use be made of schemes which are designed to afford people anonymity, or which enable them to use multiple identities or pseudonyms, while at the same time protecting the organization′s own interest. Describes multi‐purpose and inhabitant registration schemes, and notes the recurrence of proposals to implement and extend them. Identifies public policy issues. Of especial concern is the threat to personal privacy that the general‐purpose use of an inhabitant registrant scheme represents. Speculates that, where such schemes are pursued energetically, the reaction may be strong enough to threaten the social fabric.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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