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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Amit Gur, Shay S. Tzafrir, Christopher D. Zatzick, Simon L. Dolan and Roderick Iverson

The purpose of the research was to develop a tool for measuring antecedents of customer aggressive behavior (CAB) in healthcare service settings, by identifying its roots…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research was to develop a tool for measuring antecedents of customer aggressive behavior (CAB) in healthcare service settings, by identifying its roots in organizational and interpersonal dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

Four studies were conducted. In Studies 1 and 2, antecedents of CAB were identified through analysis of internet reader comments and a questionnaire was distributed to students. In Study 3, scenarios were used to validate the findings of the previous studies. Finally, in Study 4, a scale was developed and validated for measuring organization- and person-related triggers of CAB using samples of 477 employees and 579 customers.

Findings

The concept of CAB was conceptualized and validated. In total, 18 items were identified across five dimensions: personal characteristics, uncomfortable environment, aggressive role models, reinforcement of aggressive behavior and aversive treatment. The scale demonstrated good psychometric results.

Research limitations/implications

The research relies mainly on customer perspective. Employees and additional stakeholders should be included to achieve more accurate information that could contribute to a better understanding of CAB and its roots.

Practical implications

Exploring social and organizational antecedents that trigger CAB could help healthcare managers evaluate and proactively manage CAB and its implications within their organization.

Originality/value

This measurement scale is the first comprehensive tool, based on Bandura’s social learning theory (1973), that may identify and measure antecedents of CAB, and could be used to reduce CAB in healthcare service settings.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2016

Arch G. Woodside

Business realities include delays, unintended downstream consequences, exponential versus linear relationships, “hidden demons,” and virtuous and viscous feedback cycles…

Abstract

Business realities include delays, unintended downstream consequences, exponential versus linear relationships, “hidden demons,” and virtuous and viscous feedback cycles. Executives often respond to these realities by applying nearsighted short-term solutions that contribute to long-run business failure. We provide core propositions and a framework for causal mapping and testing “micro-worlds” of real-life marketing-buying realities. A microworld is a set of explicit assumptions about how things get done, that is, how each variable in a marketing-buying system relates to other variables in the system. The framework suggests applying eight steps linking systems-thinking cause mapping, policy mapping, and systems dynamics modeling. The chapter reviews case research studies that apply the eight steps. Modeling system dynamics of business relationships aims to run simulations of the resulting microworld model of a specific reality; the main aim goes beyond description and explanation to offer prescriptions that reduce the occurrence of viscous cycles and encourage decisions leading to virtuous cycles. Hopefully, this chapter serves to awareness and use of system dynamics tools among case study researchers and executives in business and industrial marketing.

Details

Making Tough Decisions Well and Badly: Framing, Deciding, Implementing, Assessing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-120-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Arch G. Woodside

This article sets out to describe the benefits of systems thinking in overcoming short‐sighted decision making in business and industrial marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

This article sets out to describe the benefits of systems thinking in overcoming short‐sighted decision making in business and industrial marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The article illustrates specific tools and recent applications of systems thinking research.

Findings

The basic building‐blocks for creating microworlds are the claims made by stakeholders running and affected by real‐life systems.

Research limitations/implications

Suggestions for future research includes transforming research designs from linear one‐way models to models expressly recognizing time delays, feedback loops among variables, and seemingly hidden, unimportant relationships.

Practical implications

All business exchanges involve systems and there is more complexity than is readily apparent; systems thinking helps decision makers to deeply understand what is really happening.

Originality/value

This article advises replacing the one‐direction thinking and research paradigm that dominates business and industrial marketing with systems thinking and system dynamics modeling; the article identifies examples and the literature necessary to embrace this alternative paradigm.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Roderick D. Iverson, Colin S. McLeod and Peter J. Erwin

Believes that organizations need to match their internal marketing programmes to fit with their external marketing orientation. According to the contingency view of…

Abstract

Believes that organizations need to match their internal marketing programmes to fit with their external marketing orientation. According to the contingency view of marketing, we can achieve organizationally desirable outcomes, by managing the factors that lead to “mediators” in the form of employee trust and organizational commitment. Presents the findings of a study, based on a survey of 513 patient contract employees in a major public hospital, ascertaining that organizational commitment and dimensions of trust have different antecedents and relationships with preferred organizational outcomes. Argues that organizations which emphasize flexibility and customer orientation will need to develop organizational commitment and trusting relationships with their employees through appropriate internal strategies.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Aviv Kidron, Shay S. Tzafrir, Ilan Meshulam and Roderick D. Iverson

The purpose of the study is to develop a deeper understanding of the construct “integration within the HRM subsystem”. The study attempts to shed light on the conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to develop a deeper understanding of the construct “integration within the HRM subsystem”. The study attempts to shed light on the conceptual perspective, the characteristics of this construct as well as the meaning and the mechanisms of internal integration within a HRM subsystem.

Design/methodology/approach

The procedure involves three main steps: first data reduction followed by data display and conclusion drawing/verification. Semi‐structured, face‐to‐face interviews with 21 vice‐president HRM managers and senior managers were conducted. The average time of the interviews was 60 minutes.

Findings

The findings revealed a model composed of HRM infrastructure (HRM cooperative policy, integrative core competence, and integrative technological infrastructure), internal communication process (formal and informal) and integrating process (consistency of HRM practices at the subsystem and individual levels). The first two categories are related with the dependent category‐integrating process.

Practical implications

HRM subsystems should develop their integrative technological infrastructure so that they can have a wide‐ranging view about their activities. Also, informal mechanisms may enhance the integrating process, as well as the formal mechanisms. Thus, managers should support and encourage the informal climate, and facilitate especially on informal communication.

Originality/value

The findings suggest a new approach for analyzing the integration process within an organizational HR sub‐system. On the one hand, the continuity of integration demonstrates how each category may contribute to the integration process on a high level. On the other, the low level of each category illustrates the opposite side of integration.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2017

Kala Saravanamuthu

Accounting’s definition of accountability should include attributes of socioenvironmental degradation manufactured by unsustainable technologies. Beck argues that emergent…

Abstract

Accounting’s definition of accountability should include attributes of socioenvironmental degradation manufactured by unsustainable technologies. Beck argues that emergent accounts should reflect the following primary characteristics of technological degradation: complexity, uncertainty, and diffused responsibility. Financial stewardship accounts and probabilistic assessments of risk, which are traditionally employed to allay the public’s fear of uncontrollable technological hazards, cannot reflect these characteristics because they are constructed to perpetuate the status quo by fabricating certainty and security. The process through which safety thresholds are constructed and contested represents the ultimate form of socialized accountability because these thresholds shape how much risk people consent to be exposed to. Beck’s socialized total accountability is suggested as a way forward: It has two dimensions, extended spatiotemporal responsibility and the psychology of decision-making. These dimensions are teased out from the following constructs of Beck’s Risk Society thesis: manufactured risks and hazards, organized irresponsibility, politics of risk, radical individualization and social learning. These dimensions are then used to critically evaluate the capacity of full cost accounting (FCA), and two emergent socialized risk accounts, to integrate the multiple attributes of sustainability. This critique should inform the journey of constructing more representative accounts of technological degradation.

Details

Parables, Myths and Risks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-534-4

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Matthew S. Crow, Chang‐Bae Lee and Jae‐Jin Joo

In spite of the importance of officers' perception of organizational justice and its influence on organizational commitment, the policing literature lacks information…

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the importance of officers' perception of organizational justice and its influence on organizational commitment, the policing literature lacks information about the relationship between the factors. Using job satisfaction as a mediator, this study aims to examine an indirect influence of organizational justice on police officers' commitment to their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a survey of 418 police officers in South Korea while on in‐service training. In exploring the complex relationship among organizational justice (i.e. distributive, procedural, and interactional), job satisfaction, and organizational commitment, the researchers utilized structural equation modeling to overcome the weaknesses of linear regression models.

Findings

Officers' perception of organizational justice was positively related with their level of organizational commitment. In addition, perception of procedural and interactional justice had an indirect impact on the officers' organizational commitment through distributive justice. Lastly, perception of organizational justice showed an indirect influence on organizational commitment through job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Due to its cross‐sectional design, the findings do not confirm any causal relationship among the variables. In addition, the current study used a purposive sample of police officers in South Korea, which may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by examining organizational commitment in light of officers' perception of organizational justice and job satisfaction using structural equation modeling to explore the complex relationship among the organizational factors.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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