Search results

1 – 10 of 33
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Darryl Dymock and Rod Gerber

Looks at the nature of workplace learning, stating that there is a concern about the link between it and the classroom. Examines the transition from training to work by…

3225

Abstract

Looks at the nature of workplace learning, stating that there is a concern about the link between it and the classroom. Examines the transition from training to work by means of research carried out among two cohorts of students from a private vocational training college in Australia. Concludes that college‐based and workplace training are different which is a challenge that companies need to recognise and accommodate.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Rod Gerber

Anecdotal evidence abounds of people in workplaces who use common sense in their work practices. Until now, the idea of common sense being a key concept in workplace…

1654

Abstract

Anecdotal evidence abounds of people in workplaces who use common sense in their work practices. Until now, the idea of common sense being a key concept in workplace learning and practice has not been valued too highly. Attempts have been made in psychological and philosophical literature to understand how common sense knowledge differs from theoretical knowledge. This study represents an initial attempt to use people’s experience in workplaces to understand how they see common sense as an important element of workplace learning. Using a phenomenographic research approach, it was revealed that people held seven different understandings of common sense in workplace experiences. For them, common sense was experienced as: a gut feeling, an innate ability, knowing how, learning, using others, demonstrable cognitive abilities, and personal attributes. These variations offer a broader approach to thinking about common sense in work practices.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Darryl Dymock

487

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Rod Gerber

It is often assumed by management in different workplaces that the people who work there acquire their training before they take up a job or that they are trained in their…

3639

Abstract

It is often assumed by management in different workplaces that the people who work there acquire their training before they take up a job or that they are trained in their job. Learning is a lifelong process that should be embraced by all workers. Increasing interest is being placed on companies as learning organisations in which the employees collectively contribute to the improvement of the workplace enterprise. However, modest attention has been paid to the ways by which people learn in their work. This article indicates, based on considerable worksite research, that how people learn in their work is a complex process characterised by a range of variations. Management in different worksites needs to understand the diversity of approaches by workers to learning in their jobs and offer opportunities for such activities to be continuous, reflective, individualised and/or collective. A more effective workforce will result if the workers can maximise learning in their work.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Rod Gerber

290

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Peter Shanahan and Rod Gerber

This paper examines the varying experiences of quality amongst key stakeholders (those who have an interest in, an impact on or are users of) in faculty student…

2990

Abstract

This paper examines the varying experiences of quality amongst key stakeholders (those who have an interest in, an impact on or are users of) in faculty student administration in an Australian university and proposes a framework for understanding quality in this context. Data were obtained using a qualitative phenomenographic research approach and collected through 42 face‐to‐face interviews with key stakeholders (students, parents, administrative staff, academic staff, executive officers, domestic partners, offshore partners and a careers adviser). Data were categorised into eight conceptions which represent stakeholders' understanding of quality. The relationships between the conceptions are discussed and represented diagrammatically to form a new understanding of quality in faculty student administration.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Chris Velde, Tom Cooper and Rod Gerber

Reports on the results of a survey with training officers addressingeducation training needs of Australia’s Adult and Community Educationsector. The responses show that…

1222

Abstract

Reports on the results of a survey with training officers addressing education training needs of Australia’s Adult and Community Education sector. The responses show that training officers believe that this sector is rapidly growing, is important to the economic wellbeing of Australia and will benefit from course provision at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Discusses issues of course content and delivery, stressing the need for maximum flexibility in modes of study, etc.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Rod Gerber, Colin Lankshear, Stefan Larsson and Lennart Svensson

The understanding that theorists and practitioners hold ofself‐directed learning can vary depending on the context in which theyfind themselves. In an effort to understand…

2023

Abstract

The understanding that theorists and practitioners hold of self‐directed learning can vary depending on the context in which they find themselves. In an effort to understand these variations, attempts to synthesize theoretical understandings of the concept of self‐directed learning in the workplace. Includes an empirical study involving 21 white‐collar employees in four Australian businesses. Reveals six variations in the workers′ conception of the experience of self‐directed learning in their jobs. Provides a brief comparative discussion of the results of synthesis of the literature and those from the empirical study.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Tauno Kekäle and Sara Cervai

403

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Richard Teare

This paper seeks to explore how organizations can use workplace learning to cope with and respond to change, create and sustain an active learning culture and monitor and…

1735

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore how organizations can use workplace learning to cope with and respond to change, create and sustain an active learning culture and monitor and evaluate their investment in organizational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a series of questions and summaries from selected articles to review workplace learning and its role in developing professionalism, skills and competency and the main implications for training.

Findings

The paper concludes that a carefully crafted strategy for workplace learning will yield significant individual and organizational benefits.

Practical implications

The paper draws on a decade of experience in designing and implementing workplace learning initiatives used by large organizations in hospitality, tourism and other service industries.

Originality/value

The paper provides a checklist that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of organizational learning.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33