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Article

Rocio Ruiz-Benitez, Cristina López and Juan C. Real

In the present work, lean and resilient practices applied to supply chains are studied in order to evaluate their impact on the three dimensions of sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

In the present work, lean and resilient practices applied to supply chains are studied in order to evaluate their impact on the three dimensions of sustainability. Additionally, the mutual impact of lean and resilient supply chain practices is investigated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The aerospace sector and its supply chain are chosen, since lean and resilient practices have been proven relevant in the sector. A methodology based on Interpretive Structural Modeling approach is applied in order to identify the existing relationships between lean and resilient supply chain practices and their impact on the three different dimensions of sustainability.

Findings

The results reveal synergetic effects between lean and resilient practices. The former practices act as drivers of the latter practices. Hence, lean practices lead to direct and indirect effects in achieving supply chain sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between lean and resilient practices has been studied for the aerospace sector. Different sectors may lead to different results as the practices considered important in each sector may differ as well as the way in which each practice is implemented.

Originality/value

This study highlights the relationship existing between lean and resilient supply chain practices and their impact on sustainability. Additionally, several managerial implications are drawn out to help managers make better decisions.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Jesus Cambra‐Fierro and Rocio Ruiz‐Benitez

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the advantages that an intermodal logistics platform may provide to companies integrating a supply chain, both to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the advantages that an intermodal logistics platform may provide to companies integrating a supply chain, both to manufacturers/distributors and to logistics providers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces a new logistics platform, PLAZA, the largest in Europe, and which was installed in Zaragoza, where some international companies, including Inditex, are established.

Findings

The intermodality and integration provided by an intermodal logistics platform may provide competitive advantages to global supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a specific case study and, therefore, the conclusions may be only partially generalized to other domains. However, the case results from this example may offer a useful guide to assist managers of global supply chains.

Practical implications

Firms should consider the option of intermodality and the integration of some of the activities of its supply chain in order to decrease transportation costs and lead time, and increase customer service, among other advantages.

Originality/value

The paper provides some practical insights from an intermodal logistics platform and the advantages that may be generated for companies.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

Jesús Cambra‐Fierro and Rocío Ruiz‐Benítez

This paper aims to study sustainable business practices of two Spanish small and medium enterprise (SMEs) belonging to different sectors: a winery and a paint company…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study sustainable business practices of two Spanish small and medium enterprise (SMEs) belonging to different sectors: a winery and a paint company. Special attention is paid to the drivers of such business practices and the lessons that can be learnt from them.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a comparative case study approach. The authors describe and compare two business cases from different industry sectors. This paper concludes with several findings that could be of interest for some other companies, as well as interesting areas of future research.

Findings

A comparison of sustainable business practices and their drivers. Similarities and differences between companies lead to different approaches to sustainability. Sustainability may be understood as a strategic tool in order to achieve competitive advantages and help companies successfully operate internationally.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this research is the specific sectors in which it has been carried out that can limit the application of the findings. Further research in additional industry sectors needs to be done to support the implications found in this paper.

Practical implications

Companies need to consider sustainability practices as a long‐term investment instead of as an immediate cost. Culture is a decisive factor in the implementation of sustainable practices.

Social implications

Customers can force companies to implement sustainable practices. However, it has been observed that sometimes there is a need for strict regulations in the sector to encourage companies to implement such practices since customers may not be influenced by the company's sustainable practices.

Originality/value

This research studies and compares actual sustainable business practices in two SMEs based in Spain, but of international activity and belonging to different industry sectors. The main drivers and characteristics of sustainable practices are compared and general implications are drawn from the study.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article

Jesús Cambra‐Fierro and Rocío Ruiz‐Benítez

This paper proposes a framework that considers some key concepts to design and manage supply chains in both national and international contexts. For a better…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a framework that considers some key concepts to design and manage supply chains in both national and international contexts. For a better understanding, it is intended to illustrate this framework with the case of Carrefour in both Spain and China.

Design/methodology/approach

In the form of a case study the paper explains global strategies in both countries. The paper also discusses similarities and differences in the supply chain management in both contexts.

Findings

The paper found application of core SCM concepts to a leader distribution firm. “Thinking global and acting local” is also pertinent to application in the management of supply chains.

Practical implications

Managers may identify key processes and consider the possible contributions of each to the efficiency of their own chains. This case study could be also used as an example of the successful management of the supply chain of a company leader in its sector.

Originality/value

The present paper illustrates a leader company based on real data.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article

Nils M. Høgevold, Göran Svensson, Rocio Rodriguez and David Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent that a selection of economic, social and environmental factors is taken into corporate consideration (importance and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent that a selection of economic, social and environmental factors is taken into corporate consideration (importance and priority) the longitudinal aspects of sustainable business practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an inductive approach taking into account the longitudinal aspects and an in-depth case study of a Scandinavian manufacturer recognized for its initiatives and achievements of sustainable business practices.

Findings

The key informants indicated that economic factors are always important when it comes to sustainable business practices, social factors are to some extent important, and the environmental factors are generally important.

Research limitations/implications

The planning, implementation and follow-up of sustainable business practices and related efforts require a consideration of economic, social and environmental factors.

Practical implications

The framework of a triple bottom line (TBL) dominant logic for business sustainability applied may guide the corporate assessment to plan, implement and follow-up the importance and priority of the longitudinal aspects of sustainable business practices.

Originality/value

A TBL dominant logic for sustainable business practices adequately frames corporate efforts regarding importance and priority making a relevant contribution addressing the longitudinal aspects to complement existing theory and previous studies.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article

Rocio Rodriguez, Goran Svensson and David Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to assess both private and public organizations in order to compare the similarities and differences between the organizational priority logic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess both private and public organizations in order to compare the similarities and differences between the organizational priority logic of TBL elements. The research objective is, therefore, to describe the organizational logic, so as to prioritize between economic, social and environmental elements of the triple bottom line (TBL). The approach is also to describe the common denominators and differentiators between private and public organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on judgmental sampling and in-depth interviews of executives at private and public hospitals in Spain. Data were collected from the directors of communication of private hospitals, and from the executive in charge of corporate social responsibility of public hospitals.

Findings

The organizational logic for prioritizing the elements of TBL differs between private and public hospitals. The economic element of TBL is crucial to survival for private hospitals. Compliance with the legal requirements and certifications of the environmental element is the major concern for public hospitals. Private and public hospitals would both pay considerably greater attention to the social element of TBL, if there were no judicial and economic restrictions.

Research limitations/implications

This study differs from previous ones in terms of exploring the interfaces and relationships between TBL elements, which focus on the organizational logic to prioritize between the elements of TBL. There are both common denominators and differentiators between private and public hospitals, when it comes to the priority logic of TBL elements.

Practical implications

The priority logic of determining the most important TBL element it is mainly about satisfying organizational needs and societal demands. Determining the second most important TBL element is mostly about organizational preferences and what it wants to achieve. Determining the least important TBL element it is about the organizational mindset for and with respect to the future.

Originality/value

This study contributes to determining the appropriate organizational priority logic of the TBL elements, as well as common denominators and differentiators between private and public organizations. It also contributes to explaining the organizational reasoning as to why one TBL element may be prioritized over another, an issue which has not been addressed in existing theory and previous studies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Miao Sun, Ye Tian, Yufei Yan and Yi Liao

This paper aims to study the mixed after-sales service which simultaneously offers return and replacement services. The authors develop a model to propose what kind of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the mixed after-sales service which simultaneously offers return and replacement services. The authors develop a model to propose what kind of after-sales service the firm should choose and how to make the after-sales service policy to improve the profit. The study aims to extend the literature on the mixed after-sales service and give some support to the managers to make decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors use the optimization modeling method to describe the situations of a firm offering two exclusive after-sales service policies and a mixed after-sales service policy, respectively. They compare the results in different cases and analyze the impact of different parameters on the boundary values and other results. Finally, the authors include three numerical examples to illustrate the major results.

Findings

The authors find that the mixed after-sales service can successfully segment the market, meet various customers’ distinct needs and differentiate the service prices to improve the total profit. Moreover, the authors find the boundary values which indicate the optimal interval for each service. Then, for a certain situation, they can clearly tell which after-sales service dominates and provides the optimal selling price, order quantity and total profit. Besides, the authors show the impact of different parameters on the boundary values and other results.

Originality/value

This paper combines after-sales service into traditional models and provides a new mixed service to segment the market and improve total revenue. It provides some managerial implications for the decision-makers.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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