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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Claire Massey and Robyn Walker

Suggests that interaction between managers and consultants may be a way for learning organisations to continue learning and developing. Looks at a study into the…

Abstract

Suggests that interaction between managers and consultants may be a way for learning organisations to continue learning and developing. Looks at a study into the relationship between professional consultants and their clients to identify two leading factors in influencing whether organisational learning occurs. These imply that the consultant is central for the achievement of organisational development and success. Examines two specific cases and concludes that within this context, there are a number of factors that influence whether organisational learning can be achieved, including role assignment and linking individual development to organisational development.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Robyn Walker

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Robyn Walker

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Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Robyn Walker

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Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Robyn Walker

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Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Su Olsson and Robyn Walker

Research into “corporate masculinity” suggests that executive men position their difference, status and power through discourses which involve the strategies of…

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Research into “corporate masculinity” suggests that executive men position their difference, status and power through discourses which involve the strategies of “identification with some men and differentiation from others, including women”. While these processes apparently place women in an antithetical relationship to power, women are increasingly achieving executive leadership. This paper examines the career representations of 30 senior women executives. Drawing on a social constructionist approach to gender and identity, examines women's positioning of self within the discourse and discusses how they deal with the apparent paradoxes or contradictions of female identity within a world dominated by corporate masculinity. Our findings suggest that women engage in processes of identification and differentiation comparable to those of men. Perhaps unexpectedly, these processes often involve an assertion and celebration of female difference that includes distinctions between “the wo‐men and the boys”. They also involve a more tentative process of differentiation from corporate masculinity through the construction of an emerging new culture, the culture of women in business.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Heard the one about the company which took its staff thousands of miles for a picnic? It is not a joke; it really happened in New Zealand when Dick Hubbard, owner and…

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Heard the one about the company which took its staff thousands of miles for a picnic? It is not a joke; it really happened in New Zealand when Dick Hubbard, owner and managing director of breakfast cereal manufacturer Hubbard Foods Ltd flew his entire 102‐man workforce to Western Samoa for a tenth birthday picnic during the Queen’s Birthday Week. In this article, Walker and Monin use Burke’s “dramatistic pentad” as a framework to analyze the event in terms of action, location, the star (Hubbard himself), his part in the action and the purpose, and argue that it might be used to analyze other organizational events.

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Su Olsson and Robyn Walker

Executive leadership is constituted as a predominantly male domain, placing women in an antithetical position to executive power. In theorising this situation, a social…

Abstract

Executive leadership is constituted as a predominantly male domain, placing women in an antithetical position to executive power. In theorising this situation, a social constructionist model of gender suggests that in the corporate world, as elsewhere, perceptions of the behaviour of men and women are “automatically filtered through a gendered lens” and reconstituted within a more general discourse on gender difference, tapping into subconscious images of leadership to reinforce a masculinist construction of executive power. Yet today women are increasingly in executive roles. This study explores the relationship between a social constructionist model of gender and executive discourse by drawing on interviews with ten male and ten female New Zealand executives. Given that these executives hold comparable organisational status and power, the study examines whether or not a gendered lens still operates in their representations of one another, and if there are indications of gender and social change in the discourse.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Robyn Walker and Nanette Monin

Uses Kenneth Burke’s “dramatistic pentad” as an analytical framework to analyse a company event that in New Zealand became symbolic of social responsibility in action…

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Uses Kenneth Burke’s “dramatistic pentad” as an analytical framework to analyse a company event that in New Zealand became symbolic of social responsibility in action. Presents the event in which the staff of an Auckland food processing operation was flown to Western Samoa for a weekend “picnic”. Explores the act – what happened; the scene the physical, geographic and cultural milieu of the action; the agent – managing director Dick Hubbard’s individual identity and the role he played out in terms of the action; the agency – the means by which Hubbard was enabled to accomplish this action, and his role in initiating, approving and funding the staff picnic; and finally, the purpose – the intended effect of the action and a consideration of perceived outcomes. Considers the usefulness of the dramatistic pentad to other organisational contexts. Concludes that it provides a useful model to guide the analysis of diverse organisational texts.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Jennifer F. Wood

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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