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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2011

Charmine E.J. Härtel, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Wilfred J. Zerbe

In this overview, the editors trace the history of 10 books they have helmed in what has become the legacy of the Emonet conferences. From the seeds planted in 1998 by a…

Abstract

In this overview, the editors trace the history of 10 books they have helmed in what has become the legacy of the Emonet conferences. From the seeds planted in 1998 by a small group of international scholars assembled together at the first Emonet conference, the shift of the study of emotions in organizational studies from the almost “undiscussable” to mainstream scholarship is traced. Following this historical analysis, the story of “What have we learned? Ten years on,” the latest volume in the Emonet book series, is given. In a brief summary of each chapter in the current edition, the editors draw attention to eight topic areas to showcase the remarkable and broad-ranging advances in the field of organization studies that have been enabled by attention to the role of emotions in theory and practice in 10 years since the first publication in the book series. From advances in our knowledge and understanding of work, workers and consumers, to team behavior, leader-member exchange, and In Extremis work contexts, and methodological contributions in the assessment of noncognitive traits through to advances in knowledge of positive work environments, the reader is left in no doubt that organizational scholarship and practice has been deeply enriched through bringing emotions center stage.

Details

What Have We Learned? Ten Years On
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-208-1

Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2011

Robyn E. Goodwin

This chapter addresses how emotional labor relates to effort; an important mediator in the relationship between emotional labor strategies and important outcomes. To…

Abstract

This chapter addresses how emotional labor relates to effort; an important mediator in the relationship between emotional labor strategies and important outcomes. To better understand how effort functions in these relationships, a new way of understanding emotional labor strategies is considered. This new approach accounts for effort profiles associated with different types of emotional labor. Consequently, three distinct categories of emotional labor strategies emerge; cause-focused, symptom-focused, and avoidance actions. These new categories are contrasted with the current dichotomous understanding of emotional labor strategies; surface and deep acting. How these three distinct sets of emotional labor strategies are specifically related to effort – and thus to outcomes of interest – is discussed and propositions are made. The implications of, and avenues for future research afforded by this new categorization of emotional labor are discussed.

Details

What Have We Learned? Ten Years On
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-208-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2011

Abstract

Details

What Have We Learned? Ten Years On
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-208-1

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

Jennifer Mann, Sue Devine and Robyn McDermott

Integrated care is gaining popularity in Australian public policy as an acceptable means to address the needs of the unwell aged. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated care is gaining popularity in Australian public policy as an acceptable means to address the needs of the unwell aged. The purpose of this paper is to investigate contemporary models of integrated care for community dwelling older persons in Australia and discuss how public policy has been interpreted at the service delivery level to improve the quality of care for the older person.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review was conducted for peer-reviewed and grey literature on integrated care for the older person in Australia. Publications from 2007 to present that described community-based enablement models were included.

Findings

Care co-ordination is popular in assisting the older person to bridge the gap between existing, disparate health and social care services. The role of primary care is respected but communication with the general practitioner and introduction of new roles into an existing system is challenging. Older persons value the role of the care co-ordinator and while robust model evaluation is rare, there is evidence of integrated care reducing emergency department presentations and stabilising quality of life of participants. Technology is an underutilised facilitator of integration in Australia. Innovative funding solutions and a long-term commitment to health system redesign is required for integrated care to extend beyond care co-ordination.

Originality/value

This scoping review summarises the contemporary evidence base for integrated care for the community dwelling older person in Australia and proposes the barriers and enablers for consideration of implementation of any such model within this health system.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Robyn L Gobin, Madhavi K. Reddy, Caron Zlotnick and Jennifer E. Johnson

Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and psychopathy are similar, but distinct, psychiatric conditions that are common in male and female inmates; a segment of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and psychopathy are similar, but distinct, psychiatric conditions that are common in male and female inmates; a segment of the population with high rates of trauma exposure. It is unclear whether specific types of lifetime trauma are associated with ASPD and psychopathy in incarcerated women and men. Furthermore, the unique roles of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity and trauma victimization in antisocial personality disturbance are not well-understood. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigated associations between trauma variables (different kinds of traumatic experiences and PTSD) and antisocial personality variables (ASPD and psychopathy) in a sample of incarcerated women and men who participated in a randomized clinical trial for major depressive disorder. In total, 88 incarcerated men and women were assessed for ASPD diagnosis, psychopathy severity, PTSD symptom severity, and history of physical, sexual, and crime-related trauma. Regression analyses predicted ASPD or psychopathy from trauma variables, controlling for gender.

Findings

Physical trauma was the only form of trauma that was significantly related to psychopathy. Physical trauma and crime-related trauma were associated with ASPD. PTSD symptom severity was not associated with psychopathy or ASPD.

Originality/value

There are associations between some kinds of lifetime trauma exposure and current ASPD/psychopathy in the target sample, but these associations do not appear to be mediated through current PTSD symptoms.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Robyn S. Lacy

Abstract

Details

Burial and Death in Colonial North America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-043-2

Abstract

Details

Burial and Death in Colonial North America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-043-2

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

James Lappeman, Robyn Clark, Jordan Evans and Lara Sierra-Rubia

This study analysed the effect of online negative word-of-mouth (nWOM) firestorms in the retail banking sector. By understanding negative sentiment and sentiment recovery…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analysed the effect of online negative word-of-mouth (nWOM) firestorms in the retail banking sector. By understanding negative sentiment and sentiment recovery across an entire retail banking sector, the research exposed a unique view of banking in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The study made use of both a sentiment and topic analysis of over 1.7 million social media posts in South Africa. The methodology made use of both NLP and human validation techniques to measure changes in social media sentiment during online firestorms. This measurement included each of South Africa's major retail banks over a twelve month period.

Findings

From the analysis, key trigger characteristics for these firestorms (product failures, service failures, social failures and communication failures) were categorised. In addition, the average duration of a firestorm was calculated and factors that impact sentiment recovery were explored.

Originality/value

The study was located in South Africa and, unlike firm level studies, researched nWOM for the whole retail banking sector. A theoretical footprint depicting the typical anatomy of a firestorm was derived in order to aid stakeholders to be more vigilant and better equipped to provide correct intervention in such times of crisis.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2010

1163

Abstract

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Martin Jones, David Thompson, Chantal Ski, Robyn Clark, Richard Gray, Kari Vallury and Ferdous Alam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of psychosocial treatments to support families living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of psychosocial treatments to support families living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. The paper highlights that depression in people with CVD is a predictor of non-adherence to both medicines and cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes. The authors believe there is a clinical need to develop a programme of care to support the whole family to adhere to cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

A team of expert cardiovascular nurses, mental health nurses (MHN) and cardiologist clinical opinions and experiences. These opinions and experiences were supplemented by literature using MEDLINE as the primary database for papers published between December 2000 and December 2013.

Findings

People with CVD who become depressed are more likely to stop taking their medicine and stop working with their health care worker. Most people with heart and mood problems live with their families. Health workers could have a role in supporting families living with heart and mood problems to their care and treatment. The paper has highlighted the importance of working with families living with heart and mood problems to help them to stick with care and treatment.

Originality/value

Most people with heart and mood problems live with their families. The paper has highlighted the importance of working with families living with heart and mood problems to help them to persevere with care and treatment. MHN may have a role, though consideration should also be given to exploring the role of other health care workers and members of the community. As the population ages, clinicians and communities will need to consider the impact of depression on adherence when working with families living with CVD and depression.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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