Search results

1 – 10 of 437
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Aviral Shukla, Vishal Agarwal Lalit and Venkat Venkatasubramanian

Supply chain network design is an important strategic decision that firms make considering both the short‐ and long‐term consequences of the network's performance. The…

3110

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain network design is an important strategic decision that firms make considering both the short‐ and long‐term consequences of the network's performance. The typical design approach implicitly assumes that, once designed, the facilities and the links will always operate as planned. In reality, however, facilities and the links connecting them, fail from time to time due to poor weather, natural or man‐made disasters, or a combination of any other factors. This work aims to propose a design framework that addresses the facility and link failures explicitly by accounting for their impact on a network's performance measures of efficiency and robustness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study incorporated a robustness metric for evaluating the resiliency of supply chains in the case of a network disruption. This robustness metric is based on expected losses incurred due to network failures. It defines efficiency and robustness in terms of operational cost and expected disruption cost (EDC), respectively. The EDC is defined in terms of loss of opportunity cost incurred due to not meeting demand on time after a disruption has occurred. The study used a scenario planning approach and formulated a mixed integer linear program model with the objective of maximizing both efficiency and robustness. It also evaluates the trade‐offs between efficiency and robustness.

Findings

The resulting supply chain is much more reliable in the long term since we have shown that a significant amount of robustness can be built into the system without compromising a lot on efficiency.

Originality/value

This work demonstrates a methodology which incorporates such disaster scenarios into the design of a supply chain network. This leads to a more reliable supply chain which would lead to higher profitability and lower disruption rates.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Rick Edgeman

Sustainable Enterprise Excellence (SEE) is defined and developed through integration and expansion of business excellence modeling and sustainability thought. The intent

2227

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable Enterprise Excellence (SEE) is defined and developed through integration and expansion of business excellence modeling and sustainability thought. The intent is to enable simple yet reliable enterprise assessment of triple bottom line (TBL) performance and produce actionable enterprise foresight that can enable next best practices and sources of sustainable competitive advantage through innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Key elements of SEE are identified from various business excellence and sustainability reporting sources, including the Global Reporting Initiative, the UN Global Compact 10 Principles, and criteria of the European Quality Award and America's Baldrige National Quality Award. From these a model and key criteria are distilled, maturity scales developed, and a simple means of assessment presented.

Findings

A compact model and supporting maturity assessment approach similar in structure to those behind established excellence awards are developed that enable enterprise assessment of progress toward SEE. The resulting assessment is delivered in a highly consumable, combined narrative and graphic format referred to as a SEE NEWS Report.

Practical implications

The assessment approach presented enables both enterprise progress toward Sustainable Enterprise Excellence and enterprise-to-enterprise comparability. Foresight provided by the assessment enables further advancement.

Social implications

The social and environmental dimensions of SEE imply that enterprises progressing with respect to its model will of necessity contribute positively to the social fabric.

Originality/value

Sustainable Enterprise Excellence as superior TBL performance resulting from integration of ethical, effective and efficient governance with triple top line strategy is developed, together with a means of maturity assessment.

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Jacqueline Marie Cruz, Johannes Philipp Schregel and Henning Zülch

Many factors influence success at a professional football club, as each club has an exclusive definition and interpretation of success. Using the Football Management…

Abstract

Purpose

Many factors influence success at a professional football club, as each club has an exclusive definition and interpretation of success. Using the Football Management Q-Score as a foundation, the authors set out to prove the framework's robustness in the industry's current environment.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the purpose, the authors conducted interviews with Bundesliga experts. Using the Gioia Method, the authors could condense interview feedback into aggregate themes reflecting the main findings of the analysis process.

Findings

From 1,025 codes, three main contributions resulted – the concept of intercorrelation, a more balanced and dynamic framework, and four new key drivers.

Originality/value

Expert feedback validated the framework as robust, and the further main contributions gave the framework a wider application to a larger range of clubs, allowing the users of the framework to infer a greater context. Interview results proved the inclusion of Kaplan and Norton's original framework with vision and strategy.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Elias G. Carayannis, Evangelos Grigoroudis, Manlio Del Giudice, Maria Rosaria Della Peruta and Stavros Sindakis

Organizations and their members operate in increasingly complex, dynamic and even disruptive environments, with risk and uncertainty being major challenges. To that…

1971

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations and their members operate in increasingly complex, dynamic and even disruptive environments, with risk and uncertainty being major challenges. To that effect, data, information, knowledge, and respective competences are increasingly instrumental in enabling and sustaining organizational intelligence that translates into resilience in the shorter and sustainable excellence in the longer term. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the role of the artifacts and routines in a sustainable organizational excellence context.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was used to develop the context of the paper, focusing on big data and organizational intelligence for enterprise excellence and resilience. In addition, a thematic literature review method was used to study the role and impacts of routines and artifacts in organizational change, policies, structure and performance.

Findings

Although many traditional management practices retain their validity, knowledge management must give a clearer view of the existing connection between firm-level competitive advantage in open economies flows and difficult-to-use knowledge assets. The proposed framework studies knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation as organizational phenomena opposed and mutually incompatible.

Originality/value

The paper presents a first attempt to study the linkages of organizational routines and artifacts as a cycle wherein knowledge acquisition and learning competencies form and enhance a firm’s organizational intelligence, leading to robust competitiveness and sustainable entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2004

David J. LePoire

Information Technology (IT) has ushered in not only large societal opportunities but also large uncertain ‐ ties and risks. Future developments, like ubiquitous networked…

Abstract

Information Technology (IT) has ushered in not only large societal opportunities but also large uncertain ‐ ties and risks. Future developments, like ubiquitous networked embedded systems, are technologies society may face. Such technologies offer larger opportunities and uncertainties because of their ability to widely distribute power through their small, inexpensive, and ubiquitous characteristics. Many interpretations of how these technologies may develop have been postulated, ranging from the conservative Precautionary Principle, to uncontrolled development leading to “singularity.” With so much uncertainty and so many predictions about the benefits and consequences of these technologies, it is important to raise ethical questions, determine potential scenarios, and try to identify appropriate decision points and stakeholders. Rather than going along an unknown path, perhaps lessons could be learned from recently deployed technologies, such as nuclear technology, that were controversial but offered similarly large potential benefits and risks. The experience of nuclear technology development, with its various successes and failures, is recalled and compared with potential scenarios in the development of networked embedded systems

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Veer Shivajee, Rajesh Kumar Singh and Sanjay Rastogi

This study aims to provide a rich learning opportunity from COVID-19 crisis for making resilient supply chain by adopting new strategies for the procurement system.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a rich learning opportunity from COVID-19 crisis for making resilient supply chain by adopting new strategies for the procurement system.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic literature review has been conducted from the year 2012 to 2022 with the objective of developing procurement system for resilient supply chain. Fifty-four research papers are selected for this study.

Findings

The study exhibits that procurement function makes a significant contribution in creating supply chain resilience in the time of COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 emergency has enforced companies to operate in new ways to face supply chain disruptions. The new strategies and actions appropriate for resilient procurement system have been identified.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to the papers that were indexed in the Scopus database. It has also been limited to the procurement function and supply chain resilience.

Practical implications

This research highlights strategies for supply chain resilience to improve the business performance in COVID-19 or similar types of crisis.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is to identify the strategies and new practices followed in procurement function to improve the supply chain resilience. This study suggests directions for future research on the integration of procurement and manufacturing for making resilience in the supply chain.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Scott Dellana, William J. Rowe and Ying Liao

The purpose of this research is to develop a validated general measure of supply chain risk management maturity (SCRMM) to assess organizational risk management maturity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop a validated general measure of supply chain risk management maturity (SCRMM) to assess organizational risk management maturity in the context of the supply chain (SC).

Design/methodology/approach

Dimensions and statements measuring SCRMM were developed through a literature review and consultation with experts. The instrument was refined through a pilot study and a full-scale study of 140 SC managers in the USA. A final SCRMM instrument, consisting of 25 statements, was obtained through scale purification, exploratory factor analysis, reliability analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis of construct validity. Cluster analysis was conducted to characterize the organizational groupings with respect to the instrument dimensions.

Findings

SCRMM was found to be comprised of the three main dimensions of SC Risk Management Orientation, Enterprise Risk Management Integration (ERMI), and SC Risk Collaboration. ERMI was found to be comprised of the three sub-dimensions of SC Risk Mitigation, Improvement of Risk Management Processes, and Organization Internal Risk Management. Cluster analysis revealed three groups characterized according to SCRMM as leaders, followers, and laggards.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a sample in the USA, so the SCRMM scale may not generalize to supply chains in other countries or geographic regions.

Practical implications

The instrument provides a self-assessment and benchmark tool for businesses to advance their SC risk management through different stages of maturity.

Originality/value

This is a pioneering general instrument that treats risk management maturity of the organization in the context of the SC. Participants span many industries and SC positions.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Rick Edgeman

The purpose of this paper is to improve the ability of enterprises to routinely realize peak performance and produce positive social and environmental impact.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the ability of enterprises to routinely realize peak performance and produce positive social and environmental impact.

Design/methodology/approach

An acknowledged operational excellence model – the one behind the globally recognized Shingo Prize for Operational Excellence – is examined in relation to positive reciprocal behavior and the value of creating and reinforcing processes that “pile good upon good” in form of virtuous improvement cycles.

Findings

Embedding virtuous reciprocity cycles in enterprise culture and routines can help to routinize peak performance.

Research limitations/implications

Only the Shingo Operational Excellence Model is examined so that other well-known alternatives such as the Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence Model and EFQM Excellence Model are not examined. That said, the general structure and content of most excellence models is sufficiently similar that the approach taken herein would likely yield analogous conclusions.

Practical implications

Inherent in “practices” is that enterprises seek to routinize successful approaches to performance and impact, usually via contextualized implementation of excellence models or “programs” such as lean enterprise.

Social implications

Offered is one means of creating more positive enterprise cultures. Enterprises with more positive cultures have been shown to also be more productive and to contribute more positively to the fabric of society so that the “piling of good upon good” can extend beyond the borders of the enterprise.

Originality/value

The contribution herein is one of demonstrating why and how virtuous cycles can be implemented to more routinely yield improved or peak performance.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Tazim Ahmed, Chitra Lekha Karmaker, Sumaiya Benta Nasir and Md. Abdul Moktadir

The emerging markets are facing a lot of risks and disruptions across their supply chains (SCs) due to the deadly coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. To mitigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The emerging markets are facing a lot of risks and disruptions across their supply chains (SCs) due to the deadly coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. To mitigate the significant post-COVID-19 consequences, organizations should modify their existing strategies and focus more on the key flexible sustainable SC (SSC) strategies. Still now, a limited number of studies have highlighted about the flexible strategies what firms should adopt to reduce the rampant effects in the context of emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents an integrated approach including Delphi method, Bayesian, and the Best-Worst-Method (BWM) to identify, assess and evaluate the importance of the key flexible SSC strategies for the footwear industry in the emerging market context.

Findings

The results found the manufacturing flexibility through automation integration as the most important flexible SSC strategy to improve the flexibility and sustainability of modern SCs. Also, developing omni-channel distribution and retailing strategies and increasing the level of preparedness by using artificial intelligent are crucial strategies for overcoming the post-COVID-19 impacts.

Originality/value

The novelty of this research is that the research connects a link among flexible strategies, SCs sustainability, and the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, the research proposes a novel and intelligent framework based on Delphi and Bayesian-BWM to identify and analyze the key flexible SSC strategies to build up sustainable and robust SCs which can withstand in the post-COVID-19 world.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Tyler E. Thorp

The complex value chain that facilitates local food production and consumption includes purveyors positioned across a range of marketspaces who through the various ways…

Abstract

The complex value chain that facilitates local food production and consumption includes purveyors positioned across a range of marketspaces who through the various ways they present and sell their products help create and convey the meaning of “local food.” Limited governance within local food systems (LFSs) and a lack of consensus on the definition of “local food” provide purveyors with notable latitude in how they frame the meaning of “local” in the food products they produce, market, and sell. Consequently, the expansion of food products that are framed as being “local” within conventional marketspaces threatens to convolute the meaning and representation of local food within specific LFSs and across the broader local food movement (LFM). Here, I use a structured photo analysis design to explore the elements that influence the visual representation of “local food” by purveyors within five farmers’ markets and five grocery stores located across the Southern Arizona LFS (SALFS). I consider the farmers’ markets to be alternative marketspaces and the grocery stores to be conventional marketspaces. The data consist of 683 original photos taken of local food framing practices within the farmers’ markets and grocery stores and extensive field notes captured throughout multiple direct observations at each market space. My exploration is guided by a theoretical framework composed of constructs specific to institutional logic, product framing, and taste regimes. The findings illustrate how local food framing practices across alternative and mainstream marketspaces foster a local food taste regime that fails to convey the fundamental principles and values of the LFM. Recommendations for both practice and research are developed from the findings.

Details

How Alternative is Alternative? The Role of Entrepreneurial Development, Form, and Function in the Emergence of Alternative Marketscapes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-773-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of 437