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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Justin Testa

Looks at the move towards integrating robots with highperformance, fullyprogrammable vision systems. Outlines the problems of traditionalvision‐aided robotics and the…

174

Abstract

Looks at the move towards integrating robots with highperformance, fully programmable vision systems. Outlines the problems of traditional vision‐aided robotics and the advantage of modern machine vision technology. The latest generation of machine vision systems combine the capabilities of the “C” program system with graphic “point‐and Click” application development environments based on Microsoft Windows: the Checkpoint system. Describes how the Checkpoint vision systems works and the applications of the new vision guided robots. Concludes that the new systems now make it possible for users and system integrators to being the advantages of vision‐guided robotics to general manufacturing.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Don Braggins

Discusses the background of robot vision systems and examines whyvision‐guided motion for robots hasn’t lived up to the earlypromise. Outlines the different types of robot

Abstract

Discusses the background of robot vision systems and examines why vision‐guided motion for robots hasn’t lived up to the early promise. Outlines the different types of robot vision available and considers the limitation of “computer vision” in most commercial applications. Looks at the difficulties of making effective use of information from a two‐dimensional vision system to guide a robot working in a 3‐dimensional environment and at some of the possible solutions. Discusses future developments and concludes that in the short term, it is probably the opening up of programming to a larger group of potential users, with the facility of graphic user interface, which will have the greatest impact on the uptake of vision for robots.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Christine Connolly

Examines a recently launched integration of smart cameras into industrial robots to make them responsive to a changing environment.

Abstract

Purpose

Examines a recently launched integration of smart cameras into industrial robots to make them responsive to a changing environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the capabilities of the vision‐enabled robot, citing installations in Sweden and the UK, then describes the robot and vision programming procedure.

Findings

Vision integration opens up a range of new possibilities such as simultaneous product handling and inspection, as well as providing real‐time robot guidance. Standardisation plays an extremely valuable role in building integrated systems from disparate technological elements. Here ActiveX web standards, ethernet connectivity, a standard interchangeable family of cameras and a common controller for a whole range of robots are the keys to the synthesis of a powerful new combination of robot and machine vision.

Originality/value

Draws to the attention of industrial engineers the availability of a family of robots with integrated machine vision.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Thomas D. Jerney

It may have just one hand, and much less dexterity than the manual operator, but the typical robot being installed is performing tasks which were not possible to automate…

Abstract

It may have just one hand, and much less dexterity than the manual operator, but the typical robot being installed is performing tasks which were not possible to automate just a few years ago. Tedious manual operations are being replaced, with their users experiencing reductions in labour costs, worker injuries and related employer's liability exposure. The new robot is a smart, fast, pick‐and‐place device which frees workers to do other tasks.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Ron Potter

Robot‐equipped machining cells with vision and gauging systems efficiently improve throughput and reduce ergonomic concerns. This paper examines Webb Wheel Products…

Abstract

Robot‐equipped machining cells with vision and gauging systems efficiently improve throughput and reduce ergonomic concerns. This paper examines Webb Wheel Products’ installation of four robotic workcells dedicated to producing a family of brake drums and rotors.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Morten Steen Bondø, John Reidar Mathiassen, Petter Aaby Vebenstad, Ekrem Misimi, Eirin Marie Skjøndal Bar, Bendik Toldnes and Stein Ove Østvik

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new slaughter line for industrial slaughtering of salmonid fish. Traditionally, slaughtering of farmed salmonids – salmon and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new slaughter line for industrial slaughtering of salmonid fish. Traditionally, slaughtering of farmed salmonids – salmon and rainbow trout – was done manually by bleed cutting with knives. Using the new slaughter line that includes 3D machine vision and a bleed‐cutting robot, slaughtering is almost completely automated – nominally requiring only one person to supervise the line and manually bleed cut the fish not handled by the robot.

Design/methodology/approach

The design approach of the salmonid slaughter line focuses on using 3D machine vision and a bleed‐cutting robot with four biaxial pneumatic actuators to handle the slaughtering of pre‐anesthetized salmon and rainbow trout.

Findings

Under normal operating conditions, the slaughter line is capable of automatically slaughtering 85‐95 percent of all fish at an average feed rate of 30‐80 salmon/min, and the remaining 5‐15 percent are slaughtered manually. Several issues have been discovered, that should be addressed to improve the slaughter line.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new complete salmonid slaughter line that has reduced the need for manual labor in salmonid slaughtering plants.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Steve Sorensen and Russell Stringham

Flexible feeding is an emerging alternative to traditional part feeding methods. This alternative greatly enhances the versatility of a manufacturing workcell by using a…

264

Abstract

Flexible feeding is an emerging alternative to traditional part feeding methods. This alternative greatly enhances the versatility of a manufacturing workcell by using a robot manipulator and sophisticated sensing devices such as machine vision, thereby significantly reducing both cost and set up time. This article explores the benefits of a new model in PC‐based robot control, which makes the development of flexible feeders and similar applications much easier than using traditional robot programming environments. It also explores how a programming paradigm based on a well‐defined model of the workcell greatly simplifies both the logic of the application and the calibration of the physical machine.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to review the use of imaging technologies in robotics, with an emphasis on inspection applications and the control of autonomous robots.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the use of imaging technologies in robotics, with an emphasis on inspection applications and the control of autonomous robots.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief introduction, this paper first considers vision‐based robotic inspection systems and highlights a selection of recent applications. Second, it considers the use of vision in autonomous robot navigation and discusses some of the challenges and recent developments.

Findings

This shows that developments in machine vision have led to vision systems being used in a diversity of component‐level and in‐service robotic inspection tasks. It also illustrates that vision systems have a key role to play in the emerging generation of autonomous, mobile robots.

Originality/value

This paper provides a review of recent developments in vision‐based robotic inspection and autonomous, mobile robot navigation.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

J.F. Aviles-Viñas, I. Lopez-Juarez and R. Rios-Cabrera

– The purpose of this paper was to propose a method based on an Artificial Neural Network and a real-time vision algorithm, to learn welding skills in industrial robotics.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to propose a method based on an Artificial Neural Network and a real-time vision algorithm, to learn welding skills in industrial robotics.

Design/methodology/approach

By using an optic camera to measure the bead geometry (width and height), the authors propose a real-time computer vision algorithm to extract training patterns and to enable an industrial robot to acquire and learn autonomously the welding skill. To test the approach, an industrial KUKA robot and a welding gas metal arc welding machine were used in a manufacturing cell.

Findings

Several data analyses are described, showing empirically that industrial robots can acquire the skill even if the specific welding parameters are unknown.

Research limitations/implications

The approach considers only stringer beads. Weave bead and bead penetration are not considered.

Practical implications

With the proposed approach, it is possible to learn specific welding parameters despite of the material, type of robot or welding machine. This is due to the fact that the feedback system produces automatic measurements that are labelled prior to the learning process.

Originality/value

The main contribution is that the complex learning process is reduced into an input-process-output system, where the process part is learnt automatically without human supervision, by registering the patterns with an automatically calibrated vision system.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to provide details of vision-assisted robotic welding technologies and their applications.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide details of vision-assisted robotic welding technologies and their applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a short introduction, this paper first considers the background of vision-assisted robotic welding, the functions of the vision systems and the scenarios where the technology is of benefit. The main section provides examples of vision-assisted welding applications, together with details of the systems and products employed. Finally, brief concluding comments are drawn.

Findings

This shows that modern machine vision technologies, often based on lasers, can allow robotic welding systems to compensate for dimensional variations and errors, eliminate the need for complex and costly welding fixtures and act as an alternative to skilled human welders. This technology allows robotic automation to be deployed in welding applications where it was hitherto impossible, technically difficult or not cost-effective.

Originality/value

By considering a section of applications, this paper provides an insight into how machine vision technologies can enhance the capabilities of robotic welding systems.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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