Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Jozef N. Marcincin and Juraj Smrcek

Presents both description and overview of the emerging field of biomechanical grippers and shows the prototype of biomechanical gripper called the Presov biomechanical…

Abstract

Presents both description and overview of the emerging field of biomechanical grippers and shows the prototype of biomechanical gripper called the Presov biomechanical robot gripper. Biomechanical robots and biomechanical grippers belong under biorobotics and bioengineering systems. Basic components of biorobotics include biomechanisms, biocontrol, biointelligence and biosensors. The Presov Biomechanical Robot Gripper is an electrically‐driven, multi‐fingered dextrous gripper, which has many features that conventional industrial robot grippers do not have. This gripper has been developed in the Department of Industrial Robotics of the Technical University in Presov, Slovak Republic.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

C.T. Irwin

FLEXIBILITY has always been associated with robotic systems. However, once a robot has been integrated into an application, the robot is no longer flexible but becomes a…

Abstract

FLEXIBILITY has always been associated with robotic systems. However, once a robot has been integrated into an application, the robot is no longer flexible but becomes a part of the tooling. This loss of flexibility is attributed to the use of rigid, costly tooling, which includes end effector tooling.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2010

Mahmoud Tavakoli, Lino Marques and Aníbal T. de Almeida

The purpose of this paper is to describe design and development of a pole climbing robot (PCR) for inspection of industrial size pipelines. Nowadays, non‐destructive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe design and development of a pole climbing robot (PCR) for inspection of industrial size pipelines. Nowadays, non‐destructive testing (NDT) methods are performed by dextrous technicians across high‐level pipes, frequently carrying dangerous chemicals. This paper reports development of a PCR that can perform in situ manipulation for NDT tests.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces a PCR including a novel four‐degrees of freedom climbing serial mechanism with the nearly optimal workspace and weight, unique V‐shaped grippers and a fast rotational mechanism around the pole axis. Simplicity, safety, minimum weight, and manipulability were concerned in the design process.

Findings

The developed prototype proved possibility of application of PCRs for NDT inspection on elevated structures. Design and development of PCRs which are able to pass bends and T‐junctions faces much more difficulties than those which should climb from a straight pole.

Practical implications

The robot is successfully tested on an industrial size structure (exterior diameter of 219 mm) with bends and T‐junctions.

Originality/value

Design and development of a novel pole climbing and manipulating robot for inspection of industrial size pipelines. The robot is able to pass bends and T‐junctions. The V‐shaped grippers offer many advantages including safety and tolerance to power failure. After grasping the structure, in case of power failure in any of the grippers' motors, the robot does not slip on the structure. The Z‐axis rotational mechanism provides fast navigation around the pole which is not possible with the traditional serial articulated arms.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Anna Eisinberg, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario, Joerg Seyfried, Ramon Estana and Heinz Woern

The aim of the research is to perform an accurate micromanipulation task, the assembly of a lens system, implementing safe procedures in a flexible microrobot‐based…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research is to perform an accurate micromanipulation task, the assembly of a lens system, implementing safe procedures in a flexible microrobot‐based workstation for micromanipulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to the micromanipulation research issue consists in designing and building a micromanipulation station based on mobile microrobots, with 5 degrees of freedom and a size of a few cm3, capable of moving and manipulating by the use of tube‐shaped and multilayered piezo‐actuators. Controlled by visual and force/tactile sensor information, the micro‐robot is able to perform manipulation with a motion resolution down to 10 nm in a telemanipulated or semi‐automated mode, thus freeing human operators from the difficult task of handling minuscule objects directly. Equipped with purposely‐developed grippers, the robot can take over high‐precise grasping, transport, manipulation and positioning of mechanical or biological micro‐objects. A computer system using PC‐compatible hardware components ensures the robot operation in real‐time.

Findings

The robots and the grippers described in this paper are highly interesting tools. Even if each specific application may require specific modifications, the proposed solution is extremely versatile, due to the ability to manipulate with a very large stroke (being the size of the base the robot works on) with a very high motion resolution. These positive aspects do make the robots very suitable also for working in a scanning electron microscope, for wafer inspection in a laboratory, and so on.

Research limitations/implications

Future work will include modifications to the existing system in order to enhance the flexibility of the workstation: e.g. other robots and other tools with different characteristics will be designed and fabricated. Research efforts will be devoted in particular to further miniaturization of the actuators.

Practical implications

This workstation can be used as a platform for assembling novel prototypes, and as a test bench for testing new assembly procedures or new products, e.g. the lens assembly procedure described in this work, even if not suitable for mass production, was useful to assess the performance of the two‐lenses assembly system itself, compared to standard systems with just one lens.

Originality/value

The system proves that the development of mobile micro‐robots is a promising approach to realise very small and flexible tools useful for different applications. By means of its intuitive teleoperation mode, the system enables the user to work in the micro‐world; due to the force feedback the user is almost immersed into the micro‐world and gets a sense for the handled object.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

N. Boubekri and Pinaki Chakraborty

The application of robots to industrial problems often requires grasping and manipulation of the work piece. The robot is able to perform a task adequately only when it is…

Abstract

The application of robots to industrial problems often requires grasping and manipulation of the work piece. The robot is able to perform a task adequately only when it is assigned proper tooling and adequate methods of grasping and handling work pieces. The design of such a task requires an in‐depth knowledge of several interrelated subjects including: gripper design, force, position, stiffness and compliance control and grasp configurations. In this paper, we review the research finding on these subjects in order to present in a concise manner, which can be easily accessed by the designers of robot task, the information reported by the researchers, and identify based on the review, future research directions in these areas.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to provide details of recent commercial and academic developments in flexible and soft grippers and considers their impact on emerging robotic markets.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide details of recent commercial and academic developments in flexible and soft grippers and considers their impact on emerging robotic markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction, this paper first considers commercially available anthropomorphic robotic hands and soft grippers. It then discusses a selection of recent research activities and concludes with a brief discussion of the potential of these developments.

Findings

Anthropomorphic robotic hands, which seek to mimic the structure and capabilities of the human hand, together with a technologically diverse family of soft grippers have recently have been commercialised. Most are produced by companies which spun-out from academic establishments. A strong body of innovative research continues and involves a wide range of principles and technologies. These gripping technologies are expected to catalyse several new and emerging applications; the most important being in agile manufacturing, particularly when used with collaborative robots (cobots).

Originality/value

This paper provides details of recent developments and research into anthropomorphic hands and soft grippers and an insight into their applications.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

Fan Y. Chen

The kinetic characteristics of grippers for industrial robots are studied. Determination of the input‐output force of grippers and calculations of gripping force for…

Abstract

The kinetic characteristics of grippers for industrial robots are studied. Determination of the input‐output force of grippers and calculations of gripping force for different combinations of gripper's posture and workpiece orientation are included.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

S.H. Masood and Hussain A. Khan

This paper presents an investigation on the development of different pattern placement strategies in robotic palletisation of box packages in the packaging industry with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an investigation on the development of different pattern placement strategies in robotic palletisation of box packages in the packaging industry with practical implementations for one, two, four and five block patterns with the aim of improving the operational efficiency in robotic palletisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The work involves considering the gripper design and maximum number of picks and various process parameters that affect the robotic implementation of pallet patterns and develops a methodology to form different patterns for a given pallet size.

Findings

The proposed methodology represents an efficient approach for pallet pattern implementation and results in reduced number of placements required for a given number of boxes per layer and reduced time for palletisation.

Originality/value

The paper introduces a novel technique for pallet loading problem (PLP) considering the physical aspects and restrictions encountered when using the robot and the gripper size to generate the pattern on the pallet. Traditional solutions of PLP do not consider these aspects in pattern placements.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Yousef Ebraheem, Emilie Drean and Dominique Charles Adolphe

The paper aims to present the design, validation and integration of a universal fabric gripper. Flexible material handling is one of the most challenging problems…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to present the design, validation and integration of a universal fabric gripper. Flexible material handling is one of the most challenging problems occurring in the field of manipulator robots. Because textile products shape and properties can widely vary, each textile and each technological operation should have its own specialized gripper. The objective of the work described here is therefore to design a universal gripper able to grip and transfer every kind of textile.

Design/methodology/approach

The design objectives are the ability to handle panels of varying shapes and sizes without material deformation and/or folding, and the easy integration with commercially available manipulator robots. To answer initial requirements and increase the textile gripping reliability, we opted to combine three different gripping technologies: vacuum, intrusion and pinch.

Findings

Each system was first validated independently through static tests. The vacuum technology offers a high reliability to handle impermeable materials. The intrusion technology is reliable for the manipulation of high porosity materials, while the pinch technology shows good results for all soft fabrics when combined with the vacuum technology. Then, the limits of the new gripper in terms of gripping capacity, compressed air consumption and characteristics and limitations of the flexible material handled were put in evidence using a robot arm. An automated selection program of the gripper based on the material characteristics has also been developed and implemented.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to design a universal gripper able to grip and transfer every different kind of cut textile.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

G. Bright and S.L. Martegoutte

Looks at a research project to design a generic robotic gripper able toassemble a PC board with electronic components as efficiently as possible.Discusses the concept of…

Abstract

Looks at a research project to design a generic robotic gripper able to assemble a PC board with electronic components as efficiently as possible. Discusses the concept of grouping electronic components into part families to allow for the design of a generic gripper to manipulate a component from each group. Outlines the design and operation of the gripper and the monitoring of its performance. Concludes that the concept of a low cost, low maintenance generic gripper compares favourably with specialized robotic end‐effectors.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000