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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Joanne Pransky

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a prominent, robotic industry engineer-turned successful innovator and leader, regarding the challenges of bringing technological discoveries to fruition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Gianmarco Veruggio who is responsible for the Operational Unit of Genoa of the Italian National Research Council Institute of Electronics, Computer and Telecommunication Engineering (CNR-IEIIT). Veruggio is an early pioneer of telerobotics in extreme environments. Veruggio founded the new applicative field of Roboethics. In this interview, Veruggio shares some of his 30-year robotic journey along with his thoughts and concerns on robotics and society.

Findings

Gianmarco Veruggio received a master’s degree in electronic engineering, computer science, control and automation from Genoa University in 1980. From 1980 to 1983 he worked in the Automation Division of Ansaldo as a Designer of fault-tolerant multiprocessor architectures for fail-safe control systems and was part of the development team for the new automation of the Italian Railway Stations. In 1984, he joined the CNR-Institute of Naval Automation (IAN) in Genoa as a Research Scientist. There, he worked on real-time computer graphics for simulation, control techniques and naval and marine data-collection systems. In 1989, he founded the CNR-IAN Robotics Department (Robotlab), which he headed until 2003, to develop missions on experimental robotics in extreme environments. His approach utilized working prototypes in a virtual lab environment and focused on robot mission control, real-time human-machine interfaces, networked control system architectures for tele-robotics and Internet Robotics. In 2000, he founded the association “Scuola di Robotica” (School of Robotics) to promote this new science among young people and society at large by means of educational robotics. He joined the CNR-IEIIT in 2007 to continue his research in robotics and to also develop studies on the philosophical, social and ethical implications of Robotics.

Originality/value

Veruggio led the first Italian underwater robotics campaigns in Antarctica during the Italian expeditions in 1993, 1997 and 2001, and in the Arctic during 2002. During the 2001-2002 Antarctic expedition, he carried out the E-Robot Project, the first experiment of internet robotics via satellite in the Antarctica. In 2002, he designed and developed the Project E-Robot2, the first experiment of worldwide internet robotics ever carried out in the Arctic. During these projects, he organized a series of “live-science” sessions in collaboration with students and teachers of Italian schools. Beginning with his new “School of Robotics”, Veruggio continued to disseminate and educate young people on the complex relationship between robotics and society. This led him to coin the term and propose the concept of Roboethics in 2002, and he has since made worldwide efforts at dedicating resources to the development of this new field. He was the General Chair of the “First International Symposium on Roboethics” in 2004 and of the “EURON Roboethics Atelier” in 2006 that produced the Roboethics Roadmap. Veruggio is the author of more than 150 scientific publications. In 2006, he was presented with the Ligurian Region Award for Innovation, and in 2009, for his merits in the field of science and society, he was awarded the title of Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, one of Italy’s highest civilian honors.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

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57

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Jon Rigelsford

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58

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Jon Rigelsford

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31

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

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38

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Jonathan Rigelsford

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51

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Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

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76

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

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49

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Mads Hvilshøj, Simon Bøgh, Oluf Skov Nielsen and Ole Madsen

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical…

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1541

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investigates the missing links and gaps between the research and developments efforts and the real‐world application requirements, in order to bring the AIMM technology from laboratories to manufacturing environments. The investigation is based on 12 general application requirements for robotics: sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot‐robot interaction, human‐robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties.

Findings

The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry) with a quick and gentle overview of AIMM. Furthermore, the paper identifies key open issues and promising research directions to realize real‐world integration and maturation of the AIMM technology.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM).

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Reginaldo Carreiro Santos and José Luís Martinho

In recent years, the development and application of innovative and disruptive technologies in manufacturing environments is shaping the fourth industrial revolution, also…

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1698

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, the development and application of innovative and disruptive technologies in manufacturing environments is shaping the fourth industrial revolution, also known as Industry 4.0. The purpose of this paper is to describe a tool to assess the maturity level in implementing Industry 4.0 concepts and technologies in manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a framework to develop maturity models found in literature, three main steps were taken: the model design from the literature review on industry 4.0 and the comparative analysis of existing models; interviews with engineers and managers of relevant industries; and pilot tests in two relevant industrial companies.

Findings

The proposed maturity model has 41 variables considering five dimensions (organizational strategy, structure and culture; workforce; smart factories; smart processes; smart products and services). The studied companies showed different levels of Industry 4.0 implementation. According to respondents, the model is useful in making an initial diagnosis and establishes a roadmap to proceed the implementation.

Practical implications

Empirical evidence supports the relevance of the proposed model and its practical usefulness. It can be used to measure the current state (initial diagnostic and monitoring assessments), and to plan the future desired state (goal), identifying which transformational capabilities should be developed.

Originality/value

The literature review did not return an enough complete maturity model to guide a self-administered assessment. Therefore, the proposed model is a valuable tool for companies and researchers to understand the I4.0 phenomenon, plan and monitor the transformation actions.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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