Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Richard Bloss

The purpose of this paper is to review development of the non‐rigid robot alternative to the fixed axis robot designs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review development of the non‐rigid robot alternative to the fixed axis robot designs.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with the developer of the snake arm style robot and study of various applications employing this robot configuration.

Findings

Rigid robot configuration no longer limits the applications to which robotics can be applied. The flexible snake‐like approach opens doors to applications previously not possible with fixed axis type robots.

Practical implications

Users and integrators will learn how to rapidly apply the snake arm approach in an ever‐growing array of successful applications.

Originality/value

Users and integrators will gain insight into how to solve application needs that previously could not be successfully addressed with rigid axis style robots, opening the door to applications where very flexible reaching is essential.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

J. Norberto Pires

This paper reports a few results of an ongoing research project that aims to explore ways to command an industrial robot using the human voice. This feature can be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports a few results of an ongoing research project that aims to explore ways to command an industrial robot using the human voice. This feature can be interesting with several industrial, laboratory and clean‐room applications, where a close cooperation between robots and humans is desirable.

Design/methodology/approach

A demonstration is presented using two industrial robots and a personal computer (PC) equipped with a sound board and a headset microphone. The demonstration was coded using the Microsoft Visual Basic and C#.NET 2003 and associated with two simple robot applications: one capable of picking‐and‐placing objects and going to predefined positions, and the other capable of performing a simple linear weld on a work‐piece. The speech recognition grammar is specified using the grammar builder from the Microsoft Speech SDK 5.1. The paper also introduces the concepts of text‐to‐speech translation and voice recognition, and shows how these features can be used with applications built using the Microsoft.NET framework.

Findings

Two simple examples designed to operate with a state‐of‐the‐art industrial robot manipulator are then built to demonstrate the applicability to laboratory and industrial applications. The paper is very detailed in showing implementation aspects enabling the reader to explore immediately from the presented concepts and tools. Namely, the connection between the PC and the robot is explained in detail since it was built using a RPC socket mechanism completely developed from the scratch.

Practical implications

Finally, the paper discusses application to industrial cases where close cooperation between humans and robots is necessary.

Originality/value

The presented code and examples, along with the fairly interesting and reliable results, indicate clearly that the technology is suitable for industrial utilization.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Richard Bloss

The purpose of this paper is to review the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago with emphasis on new innovative robot applications on display.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago with emphasis on new innovative robot applications on display.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with exhibitors of robots as well as system integrators who apply robots to specific categories of applications.

Findings

Robots are becoming smarter with more integrated capabilities such as vision and autonomous part picking from random bin locations. They are becoming more economical, faster and more application specific. Robot system integrators are creating more efficient solutions for customers to consider.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that users who investigated robot solutions in the past and found they did not meet applications requirements may want to revisit robotics and see what is new. Robot makers are making them faster, smarter and more adaptable than ever before. Today's robotic solutions can better address application needs in a more cost‐effective manner than ever before.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

B.W. Rooks

Industrial robots have become an accepted form of automation for many companies in Western Europe. The multi robot car assembly line is now the rule rather than the…

Abstract

Industrial robots have become an accepted form of automation for many companies in Western Europe. The multi robot car assembly line is now the rule rather than the exception and this type of application has advanced the state of acceptance of robots as a viable form of automation. But what is the future in other areas and is the industrial robot an economic proposition in less glamorous areas? A recent visit to Sweden, with a few calls in West Germany, revealed a surprisingly wide range of applications for the industrial robot and none more so than in the production work shops of the robot manufacturers themselves. In Sweden high wage rates and strict laws on health and safety at work provide the type of incentive that is conducive to investments in robot automation. But even in this environment robots have to work hard to be economic. They invariably work on two or three shifts and in many applications perform numerous tasks.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Richard Bloss

The purpose of this paper is to review the biannual Robot Show in Chicago with emphasis on innovative robot applications on display.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the biannual Robot Show in Chicago with emphasis on innovative robot applications on display.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of in‐depth interviews with exhibitors of robots as well as system integrators who apply robots to specific categories of applications.

Findings

Robots are rapidly moving from the industrial environment into all types of service applications. They are also becoming more autonomous, more mobile, finding their own way and delivering critical loads in office, hospital, and laboratory settings and even providing security functions.

Practical implications

Users who investigated robot solutions in the past and found that they did not meet applications requirements may find it is time to revisit robotics. Robot builders and system integrators are providing more suitable solutions that can better address application needs in a more cost‐effective manner than ever before.

Originality/value

Robots for non‐industrial applications are receiving lots of attention. Many first time exhibitors at the recent biannual Robot Show featured units for personal service, healthcare, and other non‐industrial applications.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Richard Bloss

The purpose of this paper is to review the dramatic entry of collaborative robotics into applications. It also examines the current state of the art for collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the dramatic entry of collaborative robotics into applications. It also examines the current state of the art for collaborative robotics, factors driving their entry and their outlook for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes discussions with key managers of robot companies. Attendance at the International Federation for Robotics round table discussion on collaboration and another industry round table meeting on collaborative robotics. Attendance at the CIRP technical conference on automation. Attendance at the Robotics Industry Association International Collaborative Robots Workshop.

Findings

Collaborative robotics are addressing many previously unmet applications while saving money, improving productivity, simplifying programming and speeding the time to return investment. It is forecast that collaborative robotics systems can address almost 100 million assembly and logistics tasks not previously addressable with traditional robotics technology.

Practical implications

The paper implies a major examination of collaborative robot technology now and in the future. Readers may be very excited to learn the many new tasks that collaborative robots are addressing, the many tools that have been developed to aid in selecting, designing and gaining worker acceptance and the many unique benefits that are provided, as well as the systems already available.

Originality/value

The paper implies a major examination of collaborative robot technology now and in the future. Readers may be very excited to learn the many new tasks that collaborative robots are addressing, the many tools that have been developed to aid in selecting, designing and gaining worker acceptance and the many unique benefits that are provided, as well as the systems already available.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Richard Bloss

This paper aims to present a review of the NPE 2006, Plastics Show held in Chicago, IL with emphasis on robots, their application in the plastics industry and end‐of‐arm‐tooling.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a review of the NPE 2006, Plastics Show held in Chicago, IL with emphasis on robots, their application in the plastics industry and end‐of‐arm‐tooling.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with suppliers of robots, injection molding machines, system integration of robots into plastic processing applications, control suppliers and end‐of‐arm‐tooling.

Findings

The plastic injection molding industry is moving to production cells with heavy usage of robot machine tending. The need for very short cycle times drives the interest in very fast agile robots with the ability to integrate easily into the production cell approach. New technologies such as in mold labeling also drive the need for suitable robots and competent system integrators to supply successful systems.

Practical implications

Robot builders need to continue to develop specialized robots and tooling to match with advancements in applications in the plastic industry. Users will need to think of robots as a necessary adjunct to any injection molding application.

Originality/value

Presents a review of the NPE 2006, Plastics Show, Chicago, IL, with emphasis on robots, their application in the plastics industry and end‐of‐arm‐tooling.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of present‐day and anticipated future applications of robots in the food industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of present‐day and anticipated future applications of robots in the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the use of robots in the agriculture and farming, processing and packaging and retail sectors of the industry. Examples are given of specific applications and development activities.

Findings

Robots are being developed for many agriculture and farming applications but with the exception of milking robots, most still remain at the research/prototype stage. Food processing and packaging is the best developed sector of the industry and most uses entail picking, packing and palletising, although meat cutting is a growing application. Robots are few in the food retail sector although a number of innovative, niche products have recently been launched.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the use of robots throughout the food chain and considers possible future applications.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1976

B. Weichbrodt

A new robot system has been industrially developed for applications far beyond materials handling. The combination of CNC‐microcomputer control, all‐electrical DC‐drives…

Abstract

A new robot system has been industrially developed for applications far beyond materials handling. The combination of CNC‐microcomputer control, all‐electrical DC‐drives, and a new geometry, results in a robot with unusually high programmability, accuracy and compactness. The robot is currently installed in industry doing both materials handling, precision arc welding, grinding, polishing and castings deburring and cleaning. The concept is presented, and some industrial applications are demonstrated where the robot welds and does complete steel parts finishing including sanding and polishing. One ASEA robot application is presented where the robot is doing a superior job of castings cleaning and deburring at a major Swedish foundry.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

G. Spur, I. Furgac, W. Felsing, J. Brown and P. O'Gorman

The industrial robot has now become accepted in almost every sector of manufacturing industry as this review of robot applications and specifications shows.

Abstract

The industrial robot has now become accepted in almost every sector of manufacturing industry as this review of robot applications and specifications shows.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

1 – 10 of over 9000