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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Joanne Pransky

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a prominent, robotic industry engineer-turned successful innovator and leader, regarding the challenges of bringing technological discoveries to fruition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Gianmarco Veruggio who is responsible for the Operational Unit of Genoa of the Italian National Research Council Institute of Electronics, Computer and Telecommunication Engineering (CNR-IEIIT). Veruggio is an early pioneer of telerobotics in extreme environments. Veruggio founded the new applicative field of Roboethics. In this interview, Veruggio shares some of his 30-year robotic journey along with his thoughts and concerns on robotics and society.

Findings

Gianmarco Veruggio received a master’s degree in electronic engineering, computer science, control and automation from Genoa University in 1980. From 1980 to 1983 he worked in the Automation Division of Ansaldo as a Designer of fault-tolerant multiprocessor architectures for fail-safe control systems and was part of the development team for the new automation of the Italian Railway Stations. In 1984, he joined the CNR-Institute of Naval Automation (IAN) in Genoa as a Research Scientist. There, he worked on real-time computer graphics for simulation, control techniques and naval and marine data-collection systems. In 1989, he founded the CNR-IAN Robotics Department (Robotlab), which he headed until 2003, to develop missions on experimental robotics in extreme environments. His approach utilized working prototypes in a virtual lab environment and focused on robot mission control, real-time human-machine interfaces, networked control system architectures for tele-robotics and Internet Robotics. In 2000, he founded the association “Scuola di Robotica” (School of Robotics) to promote this new science among young people and society at large by means of educational robotics. He joined the CNR-IEIIT in 2007 to continue his research in robotics and to also develop studies on the philosophical, social and ethical implications of Robotics.

Originality/value

Veruggio led the first Italian underwater robotics campaigns in Antarctica during the Italian expeditions in 1993, 1997 and 2001, and in the Arctic during 2002. During the 2001-2002 Antarctic expedition, he carried out the E-Robot Project, the first experiment of internet robotics via satellite in the Antarctica. In 2002, he designed and developed the Project E-Robot2, the first experiment of worldwide internet robotics ever carried out in the Arctic. During these projects, he organized a series of “live-science” sessions in collaboration with students and teachers of Italian schools. Beginning with his new “School of Robotics”, Veruggio continued to disseminate and educate young people on the complex relationship between robotics and society. This led him to coin the term and propose the concept of Roboethics in 2002, and he has since made worldwide efforts at dedicating resources to the development of this new field. He was the General Chair of the “First International Symposium on Roboethics” in 2004 and of the “EURON Roboethics Atelier” in 2006 that produced the Roboethics Roadmap. Veruggio is the author of more than 150 scientific publications. In 2006, he was presented with the Ligurian Region Award for Innovation, and in 2009, for his merits in the field of science and society, he was awarded the title of Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, one of Italy’s highest civilian honors.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

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143

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Robert Bogue

– This first part of a two-part paper aims to provide an insight into the ethical and legal issues associated with certain classes of robot. This part is concerned with ethics.

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1378

Abstract

Purpose

This first part of a two-part paper aims to provide an insight into the ethical and legal issues associated with certain classes of robot. This part is concerned with ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction, this paper first considers the ethical deliberations surrounding robots used in warfare and healthcare. It then addresses the issue of robot truth and deception and subsequently discusses some on-going deliberations and possible ways forward. Finally, brief conclusions are drawn.

Findings

Robot ethics are the topic of wide-ranging debate and encompass such diverse applications as military drones and robotic carers. Many ethical considerations have been raised including philosophical issues such as moral behaviour and truth and deception. Preliminary research suggests that some of these concerns may be ameliorated through the use of software which encompasses ethical principles. It is widely recognised that a multidisciplinary approach is required and there is growing evidence of this.

Originality/value

This paper provides an insight into the highly topical and complex issue of robot ethics.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Shweta Banerjee

There are ethical, legal, social and economic arguments surrounding the subject of autonomous vehicles. This paper aims to discuss some of the arguments to communicate one…

Abstract

Purpose

There are ethical, legal, social and economic arguments surrounding the subject of autonomous vehicles. This paper aims to discuss some of the arguments to communicate one of the current issues in the rising field of artificial intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

Making use of widely available literature that the author has read and summarised showcasing her viewpoints, the author shows that technology is progressing every day. Artificial intelligence and machine learning are at the forefront of technological advancement today. The manufacture and innovation of new machines have revolutionised our lives and resulted in a world where we are becoming increasingly dependent on artificial intelligence.

Findings

Technology might appear to be getting out of hand, but it can be effectively used to transform lives and convenience.

Research limitations/implications

From robotics to autonomous vehicles, countless technologies have and will continue to make the lives of individuals much easier. But, with these advancements also comes something called “future shock”.

Practical implications

Future shock is the state of being unable to keep up with rapid social or technological change. As a result, the topic of artificial intelligence, and thus autonomous cars, is highly debated.

Social implications

The study will be of interest to researchers, academics and the public in general. It will encourage further thinking.

Originality/value

This is an original piece of writing informed by reading several current pieces. The study has not been submitted elsewhere.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Unmanned Systems, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-6427

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Sheshadri Chatterjee

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors influencing the citizens to use robots that would improve the quality of life of the citizens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors influencing the citizens to use robots that would improve the quality of life of the citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

With the help of different adoption theories and models and with the support of background studies, some hypotheses have been formulated and a conceptual model has been developed with the consideration of the impact of artificial intelligence regulation (IAR) that controls the use of robots as a moderator. The model has been validated and the hypotheses have been tested by statistical analysis with the help of survey works involving consideration of feedbacks from 503 usable respondents.

Findings

The study reveals that the use of robots by the citizens would appreciably increase if government imposes strict artificial intelligence (AI) regulatory control concerning the use of robots, and in that case, it appears that the use of robots would improve the quality of life of the citizens.

Research limitations/implications

The duly validated model would help the authority to appropriately nurse and nurture the factors such as ethical dilemma, perceived risks and control beliefs for enhancing the intention of the citizens to use robots for many purposes including domestic usage in the context of appropriate restrictions imposed through AI regulation. Such use of robots would eventually improve the quality of life.

Originality/value

There are a few studies covering analysis of IAR as a moderator on the linkages of the predictors with the intention of the citizens to use robots. In this context, this study is claimed to have offered a novel contribution.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Unmanned Systems, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-6427

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Ronald Arkin

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967

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

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396

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

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115

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Amanda DiGioia

Abstract

Details

Gender and Parenting in the Worlds of Alien and Blade Runner
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-941-3

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Unlike the historical robots, the contemporary and futuristic ‘working’ robots within organisations are capable of taking decisions without human intervention. This

Abstract

Unlike the historical robots, the contemporary and futuristic ‘working’ robots within organisations are capable of taking decisions without human intervention. This chapter reviews the technical evolution of robots across history with the necessary evolution of operational procedures regarding laws and ethical standards. The objective of this review is to have a futuristic holistic insight into the new generation of robots that are invading our working environment within organisations. Out of the very wide perspective of robotics research field, this chapter only discusses the ‘working’ robots (excluding domestic, social, and warfare robots) in organisations along with its ethical and legal associated issues. To achieve this objective, the recent ‘working robot’ definition and associated expected ethics and laws, termed in this chapter as ‘Ten Commandments’ would be necessary for the utilisation of robotics before releasing ‘intelligent’ robots in the workplace environment. The proposed ‘Ten Commandments’ can be utilised by robot manufacturer to embed ‘machine testimony’ to their products. Providing that such ‘robot ethics’ built as part of the algorithmic structure of robots, a useful innovation like robot–manager is also identified in the organisational environment which can have multiple benefits as discussed in this chapter.

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