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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Robin Yap

Abstract

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Afshan Amin Khan, Roohie Naaz Mir and Najeeb-Ud Din

This work focused on a basic building block of an allocation unit that carries out the critical job of deciding between the conflicting requests, i.e. an arbiter unit. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This work focused on a basic building block of an allocation unit that carries out the critical job of deciding between the conflicting requests, i.e. an arbiter unit. The purpose of this work is to implement an improved hybrid arbiter while harnessing the basic advantages of a matrix arbiter.

Design/methodology/approach

The basic approach of the design methodology involves the extraction of traffic information from buffer signals of each port. As the traffic arrives in the buffer of respective ports, information from these buffers acts as a source of differentiation between the ports receiving low traffic rates and ports receiving high traffic rates. A logic circuit is devised that enables an arbiter to dynamically assign priorities to different ports based on the information from buffers. For implementation and verification of the proposed design, a two-stage approach was used. Stage I comprises comparing the proposed arbiter with other arbiters in the literature using Vivado integrated design environment platform. Stage II demonstrates the implementation of the proposed design in Cadence design environment for application-specific integrated chip level implementation. By using such a strategy, this study aims to have a special focus on the feasibility of the design for very large-scale integration implementation.

Findings

According to the simulation results, the proposed hybrid arbiter maintains the advantage of a basic matrix arbiter and also possesses the additional feature of fault-tolerant traffic awareness. These features for a hybrid arbiter are achieved with a 19% increase in throughput, a 1.5% decrease in delay and a 19% area increase in comparison to a conventional matrix arbiter.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a traffic-aware mechanism that increases the throughput of an arbiter unit with some area trade-off. The key feature of this hybrid arbiter is that it can assign priorities to the requesting ports based upon the real-time traffic requirements of each port. As a result of this, the arbiter is dynamically able to make arbitration decisions. Now because buffer information is valuable in winning the priority, the presence of a fault-tolerant policy ensures that none of the priority is assigned falsely to a requesting port. By this, wastage of arbitration cycles is avoided and an increase in throughput is also achieved.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2013

Darren Good, Bauback Yeganeh and Robin Yeganeh

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most…

Abstract

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most scientifically supported psychological modality. CBT like other practices has been used in coaching as cognitive behavioral coaching but rarely discussed more explicitly for the executive population. Here, we offer a specific adaptation – cognitive behavioral executive coaching (CBEC) – and suggest that it presents a flexible structure that can meet the multiple agendas that are framed for executive coaching. Additionally, the core features of CBT and CBEC in particular satisfy the major needs of executives in coaching arrangements. We conclude by demonstrating a CBEC process model for coaching the high-performing executive.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Cesare Amatulli, Matteo De Angelis, Giovanni Pino and Sheetal Jain

This paper investigates why and when messages regarding unsustainable luxury products lead to negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) through a focus on the role of guilt, need to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates why and when messages regarding unsustainable luxury products lead to negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) through a focus on the role of guilt, need to warn others and consumers' cultural orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments test whether messages describing unsustainable versus sustainable luxury manufacturing processes elicit guilt and a need to warn others and whether and how the need to warn others affects consumers' NWOM depending on their cultural orientation.

Findings

Consumers experience guilt in response to messages emphasizing the unsustainable (vs sustainable) nature of luxury products. In turn, guilt triggers a need to warn other consumers, which leads to NWOM about the luxury company. Furthermore, the results suggest that two dimensions of Hofstede's model of national culture – namely individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity – moderate the effect of the need to warn others on NWOM.

Practical implications

Luxury managers should design appropriate strategies to cope with consumers' different reactions to information regarding luxury brands' unsustainability. Managers should be aware that the risk of NWOM diffusion may be higher in countries characterized by a collectivistic and feminine orientation rather than an individualistic and masculine orientation.

Originality/value

Consumer reaction to unsustainable luxury, especially across different cultural groups, is a neglected area of investigation. This work contributes to this novel area of research by investigating NWOM stemming from unsustainable luxury manufacturing practices in different cultural contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

E. Holly Buttner and Kevin B. Lowe

The purpose of this paper is to examine: the direct effect of perceived pay equity, the interaction of perceived pay equity and productivity, and the relative effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine: the direct effect of perceived pay equity, the interaction of perceived pay equity and productivity, and the relative effects of perceived internal and external pay equity on organizational commitment (OC) among US scholars of color.

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveyed 160 professionals. Correlation and hierarchical regression were employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Perceived pay equity directly influenced OC and interacted with scholarly productivity to affect commitment. Highly productive participants who perceived pay equity reported the highest commitment. When pay was seen as inequitable, the most productive scholars reported the lowest commitment. Perceived internal pay equity had an effect, over and above perceived external pay equity on commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one industry in the USA, so the results should be generalized cautiously. While, the data were single-source and cross-sectional, the findings were consistent with previous research.

Practical implications

Findings may be useful for minority scholars’ supervisors since they have knowledge of the productivity and salaries in the department and can provide a detailed explanation for pay differences to enhance pay equity perceptions, particularly for the most productive scholars.

Originality/value

This study adds to the equity and relative deprivation theory research investigating the effect of perceived pay equity on employee outcomes by examining perceived internal and external pay equity perceptions and productivity on OC. Results suggest that highly productive minority professionals in higher education are particularly sensitive to pay equity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Gregory Shailer, Roger Willett, Kim Len Yap and Margo Wade

This paper investigates the perceptions of senior auditors in large firms in Australia, Malaysia and New Zealand concerning sources of auditor legal liability, what should…

Abstract

This paper investigates the perceptions of senior auditors in large firms in Australia, Malaysia and New Zealand concerning sources of auditor legal liability, what should constitute auditors’ duties and what may be done to reduce litigation exposure. Results are consistent with our conjecture that professional and organisational culture dominates perceptions, even in the presence of quite strong jurisdictional, cultural and institutional differences. The analysis indicates that auditors’ perceptions are strongly affected by international trends, while cultural and institutional effects tend to be more subtle but are identified by detailed and focused analysis.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Andreas I. Nicolaou

The interorganizational environment faced by business organizations presents unique challenges for management accounting and control. Past management accounting research…

Abstract

The interorganizational environment faced by business organizations presents unique challenges for management accounting and control. Past management accounting research has shown interest in such collaborations because despite their benefits, such relationships pose significant issues of coordination and control. As information and communication systems supplement management control systems in their support of decision facilitation and decision influencing, examining the design of management accounting systems (MASs) in the management of interorganizational relationships and assessing how it affects the attainment of interorganizational exchange partner performance objectives is important. In this chapter, I extend past accounting research to examine the complementary nature of decision-facilitation and decision-influencing objectives of MAS design as enabled by the use of integrated information systems in interorganizational settings. The economic theory of complementarity is employed to examine synergistic effects of complementary MAS objectives. A field survey is used to examine hypothesized relationships, and data were obtained from 116 organizations involved in strategic alliance activity. This chapter reports findings that support the view that the degree of complementarity in decision-facilitation and decision-influencing objectives assists in the development of capabilities that enhance performance in the interorganizational relationship. The study blends theory in the areas of strategy, information systems, and management accounting and extends management accounting research in the context of IT-enabled interorganizational relationships.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-086-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Jane W.H. Moy, Vivienne W.M. Luk and Philip C. Wright

Highlights Hong Kong’s many small but thriving businesses which provide most of the workforce (60 per cent) on the island. Investigates the effects of the SARS crisis and…

Abstract

Highlights Hong Kong’s many small but thriving businesses which provide most of the workforce (60 per cent) on the island. Investigates the effects of the SARS crisis and the economic turndown of 1997, following the handover to Chinese rule. Uses tables to show the local feeling on what is wrong and the possible solutions. Tries to show the various ways of an improvement in the fortunes of the young people via an educational bent.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Belverd E. Needles

This paper provides, first, a historical perspective of accounting research relating to Asian/Pacific countries as seen from the vantage of the leading international…

Abstract

This paper provides, first, a historical perspective of accounting research relating to Asian/Pacific countries as seen from the vantage of the leading international journal in the United States and, second, a bibliographical data base and index of twenty‐six years of articles on this region of the world. It accomplishes the first objective by presenting a tabular profile of research in international accounting as it pertains to countries in the Asian/Pacific Rim region as shown in articles published in the International Journal of Accounting (formerly, the International Journal of Accounting, Education and Research) and related publications which appeared from 1965 to 1990. The articles are classified according to country, research methodology, subject, and five‐year time periods. The paper accomplishes the second objective by providing an annotated bibliography of 125 articles on Asian/Pacific Rim countries and indices by country and methodology, and subject.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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