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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2023

Robin Wakefield and Kirk Wakefield

Social media is replete with malicious and unempathetic rhetoric yet few studies explain why these emotions are publicly dispersed. The purpose of the study is to investigate how…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media is replete with malicious and unempathetic rhetoric yet few studies explain why these emotions are publicly dispersed. The purpose of the study is to investigate how the intergroup counter-empathic response called schadenfreude originates and how it prompts media consumption and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consists of two field surveys of 635 in-group members of two professional sports teams and 300 residents of California and Texas with political party affiliations. The analysis uses SEM quantitative methods.

Findings

Domain passion and group identification together determine the harmonious/obsessive tendencies of passion for an activity and explain the schadenfreude response toward the rival out-group. Group identification is a stronger driver of obsessive passion compared to harmonious passion. Schadenfreude directly influences the use of traditional media (TV, radio, domain websites), it triggers social media engagement (posting), and it accelerates harmonious passion's effects on social media posting.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the groups used to evaluate the research model, sports, and politics.

Social implications

The more highly identified and passionate group members experience greater counter-empathy toward a rival. At extreme levels of group identification, obsessive passion increases at an increasing rate and may characterize extremism. Harboring feelings of schadenfreude toward the out-group prompts those with harmonious passion for an activity to more frequently engage on social media in unempathetic ways.

Originality/value

This study links the unempathetic, yet common emotion of schadenfreude with passion, intergroup dynamics, and media behavior.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Sixuan Zhang, Robin Wakefield, Jinsong Huang and Xi Li

Since its inception in 2009, the growth of real-time bidding (RTB) advertising has been dramatic. Yet, there is a dearth of research in the information system (IS) literature…

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Abstract

Purpose

Since its inception in 2009, the growth of real-time bidding (RTB) advertising has been dramatic. Yet, there is a dearth of research in the information system (IS) literature despite the potential for negative e-commerce outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to identify salient antecedents of users’ attitude toward RTB advertisements.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was constructed and tested with data from 437 respondents. SmartPLS 3.0, a partial least square (PLS) structural equation modeling (SEM) tool, was used to evaluate the research model and test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that user attitude is determined by opposing influences from the cognitive and affective attributes of an RTB advertisement. A surprise is found to elicit greater perception of advertisement personalization, timeliness and relevance, as well as privacy and intrusiveness concerns. While RTB advertisement relevance appears to lessen the effect of advertisement intrusiveness, privacy concern is exacerbated when the advertisement is more personalized. The authors discuss the implications of this study for click-through intentions and e-commerce.

Originality/value

At this point in the evolution of RTB advertising, the findings indicate that the surprise generated by the appearance of an RTB advertisement is not currently a “bad” surprise. In addition, the formation of positive user attitude toward RTB is complex because cognitive factors interact with users' concerns to strengthen or weaken the negative effects. The authors also demonstrate that attitude and stimulus–organism–response (S–O–R) theories are useful theoretical bases for the development of causal models to predict RTB attitude and click-through intentions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Patricia Ann Thomas

This paper aims to offer an example of a comprehensive mid-nineteenth century branding strategy in practice.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an example of a comprehensive mid-nineteenth century branding strategy in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a historical research methodology using archival resources and secondary sources within a conceptual framework of present-day branding theory (Bastos and Levy) and communication theory (Perloff). It interrogates visual and material data to construct a production-led examination of the development of a company brand.

Findings

The examination of the material suggests, first, that the company developed a sophisticated, multi-dimensional, multi-functional and materially coherent branding system. Second, it demonstrates that such a system represents an early example of a strategic practice that many scholars have considered to have arisen only in the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries. Third, it provides evidence that the origin, if not always the implementation, of the strategy lay with one man, Edward Gibbon Wakefield.

Originality/value

This paper is novel in its use of visual and material culture artifacts to demonstrate the intentions of those who produced them. It also offers an example of practice in an area that is often only explored in theory. It will be of interest to cultural, marketing, visual and material culture historians.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2023

HyeSeung Lee, Eunhee Park, Ambyr Rios, Jing Li and Cheryl J. Craig

This chapter features our innovative endeavors to inquire into an African-American student's potentially sensitive stories in a methodologically fluid and ethically delicate…

Abstract

This chapter features our innovative endeavors to inquire into an African-American student's potentially sensitive stories in a methodologically fluid and ethically delicate manner through two generative methods: digital narrative inquiry and musical narrative inquiry. Through a meta-level “inquiry into inquiry” approach, this work explores how we engaged in the digital and musical restorying of the participant's “Wounded Healer” narrative and uncovered its dynamism, cultural richness, and nuances. We subsequently represented the findings in humanizing ways using multimedia and music. Drawing on the insights from exploring these novel methods of digital and musical inquiry, our work illuminates noteworthy elements of narrative research: generativity, transformativity, interpersonal ethics, aesthetic ethics, and communal ethics. Additionally, the potential issue of trustworthiness in fluid narrative inquiries is addressed.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Hugh Middleton

Consideration is given to the extent to which the DSM and ICD approach to psychiatric case definition and treatment supports clinical activity. Their validity as a way of defining…

Abstract

Consideration is given to the extent to which the DSM and ICD approach to psychiatric case definition and treatment supports clinical activity. Their validity as a way of defining ‘mental illness’ is found wanting and they do not, in themselves, usefully guide treatment. These conclusions are set in a critical realist approach to ‘mental illness’, which draws attention to the legitimacy of several differing perspectives, each reflecting their own sets of interests and allegiances. DSM‐V and ICD‐11 are due to be published in 2012 and 2014 respectively, and their architects are called upon to be clear about which of these constituencies they are representing.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2024

Marjan Pouraghajan, Sara Omrani and Robin Drogemuller

This study addresses the global landscape of offsite construction, highlighting its variable adoption patterns and the challenge posed by the prevalent use of suboptimal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study addresses the global landscape of offsite construction, highlighting its variable adoption patterns and the challenge posed by the prevalent use of suboptimal decision-making methods. In response, the decision-making model seeks to equip decision-makers with tools for well-informed decisions on concrete construction systems, tailored to the unique characteristics of each project, in contrast to the persisting reliance on expert knowledge, checklists or similar tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The study extracts decision-making criteria through literature reviews, pilot studies and surveys amongst Australian construction professionals. A comprehensive comparison of four concrete systems against each identified criterion is conducted, followed by the application of an integrated decision model (Entropy-TOPSIS) to rank the systems, considering all criteria simultaneously. Real-world case studies validate the practical applicability of the model.

Findings

An analysis of 15 criteria demonstrated the multifaceted nature of selecting concrete construction systems, emphasising evolving industry priorities like time efficiency, environmental considerations and logistical constraints. The enduring appeal of in-situ concrete in complex projects underscores the significance of traditional methods. The integration of the Entropy-TOPSIS model proved to be a robust decision-making tool, enabling professionals to simultaneously consider all criteria and make well-informed, customised decisions.

Originality/value

The study’s originality lies in its comprehensive approach, considering diverse criteria and presenting a flexible decision-making model suitable for the dynamic demands of the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 April 2010

Sara Kuppin

Purpose – To examine the influence of changing diagnostic tools and the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries' practices on perceptions of depression prevalence in the…

Abstract

Purpose – To examine the influence of changing diagnostic tools and the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries' practices on perceptions of depression prevalence in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Approach – This is a general review of the sociohistorical shifts in depression diagnosis and pharmaceutical and health insurance industry practices during this time period as they impact professional and lay perceptions of changes in depression prevalence.

Findings – Shifts in the definition of depression to an increasingly medically oriented, social context-free definition along with the interaction of the pharmaceutical industry, health care, and health insurance industries in the U.S. system of mental health care have become major organizers of professional and lay perceptions of the nature of depression, its treatment, and prevalence. These sociohistorical and economic influences need to be factored into debates on depression prevalence.

Contribution of paper to the field – This chapter provides an introductory-level synthesis of basic psychiatric epidemiology concepts and social science critiques of professional and lay perceptions of depression prevalence as “epidemic.”

Details

Understanding Emerging Epidemics: Social and Political Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-080-3

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Robin Johnson and Lynn Vickery

166

Abstract

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Robin Pentecost, Suné Donoghue and Park Thaichon

Using the millennial cohort the purpose of this paper is to assess differences in shopping mall behaviour between three intra-cohorts groups: adolescents (13–17), emerging adults…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the millennial cohort the purpose of this paper is to assess differences in shopping mall behaviour between three intra-cohorts groups: adolescents (13–17), emerging adults (18–23) and young adults (24–30+).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a self-administered questionnaire, respondents were recruited through random customer intercepts at a major shopping mall in a capital city in Australia using a team of trained research assistants. After initial descriptive between group examinations, discriminant analysis was applied to verify group membership.

Findings

Results show significant differences between groups. Attitudes based upon mall attributes varied significantly, along with expenditure and other behaviour. The study provides evidence of transitional differences within a generational cohort as mall consumers mature.

Research limitations/implications

It serves as a focus for researchers to more actively consider intra-cohort segmentation relating to other generational cohorts.

Practical implications

Findings show that emerging adults to be moving away from attending the mall, which means, this group may be lost if retailers are not more proactive in attracting them or at least maintaining them. Coupling this with the group’s transition towards young adulthood, and the fact that these young adults are less likely to go to the mall there is a degree of urgency to develop strategies to keep this transition group engaged if financially feasible.

Originality/value

This research is important to ongoing theoretical perspectives of cohort theory and life cycle positions through its application to a more nuanced examination of the millennials cohort.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Viewing the last dying embers of 1984, the Orwel‐lian year of Big Brother and some of its not‐so‐far off the mark predictions, the unemployment which one cannot help feeling is…

Abstract

Viewing the last dying embers of 1984, the Orwel‐lian year of Big Brother and some of its not‐so‐far off the mark predictions, the unemployment which one cannot help feeling is more apparent than real, it is hardly surprising that the subject of Poverty or the so‐called Poverty arise. The real poverty of undernourished children, soup kitchens, children suffering at Christmas, hungry children ravenously consuming free school meals has not, even now, returned.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 87 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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