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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Saad Ghafoor, Nigel Peter Grigg and Robin Mann

This paper aims to investigate how business excellence (BE) custodians (BECs) design, develop and modify their BE frameworks (BEF’s) and to provide a general framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how business excellence (BE) custodians (BECs) design, develop and modify their BE frameworks (BEF’s) and to provide a general framework for reviewing BEFs. The design process is important to understand as these BEFs are used to help organisations understand the components of BE to guide them towards world-class performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The first step was to identify all the BE awards (BEAs) worldwide and their BEFs by conducting a review of publicly available sources. This research was then limited to only those BEAs that was held no more than two years ago. Of these, 29 BECs (with active BEAs) in 26 countries agreed to participate in the research. Data was collected with the help of a survey and 13 BECs also undertook optional follow-up interviews.

Findings

In total, 56 countries and regions have 65 active BEAs with another 17 countries having BE initiatives. The European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) excellence model and the Baldrige excellence framework are used by 37.7% and 14.5% of BECs worldwide, respectively. In total, 58.3% of the BECs review their BEFs once every three years or sooner, 100% of the BECs are confident in their BEFs’ fundamental concepts and 96.5% in their categories. There are fewer active BEAs now and the use of BE is potentially decreasing which suggests that more effort is required by the BECs in promoting BE.

Originality/value

This research collects data directly from the BECs on how BECs design and develop BEFs and provides a general framework for reviewing BEFs.

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Rubab Malik, Robin Mann and Rebecca Knapman

The purpose of the study is to investigate and document a new approach to best practice benchmarking called rapid benchmarking. Rapid benchmarking is defined by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate and document a new approach to best practice benchmarking called rapid benchmarking. Rapid benchmarking is defined by the authors as an approach to dramatically shorten the typical length of time to conduct a successful best practice benchmarking project.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved a case study exploration of a multinational dairy company's best practice benchmarking approach using structured interviews and data collection to examine the speed and results achieved through its benchmarking approach and whether it was justified in naming it as rapid benchmarking. A comparison of the speed of the dairy company's approach was undertaken against 24 other organisations that had utilised the same benchmarking methodology (TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking). In addition, a literature review was undertaken to search for other cases of rapid benchmarking and compare rapid benchmarking with other rapid improvement approaches.

Findings

The findings revealed that the approach used by the dairy company was unique, with best practices being identified and action plans signed off for deployment within a five-day period (far quicker than the average time of 211 days reported by other organisations). Key success factors for rapid benchmarking were found to be allocating five dedicated days for the benchmarking team to spend on the project, identifying the right team members for the project, obtaining sponsorship support for the project and providing intensive facilitation support through a benchmarking facilitator.

Research limitations/implications

Only one company was found to use a rapid benchmarking approach; therefore, the findings are from one case study. The depth of analysis presented was restricted due to commercial sensitivity.

Practical implications

The rapid benchmarking approach is likely to be of great interest to practitioners, providing them with a new way of finding solutions and best practices to address challenges that need to be solved quickly or with minimal expense. For organisations that have been using benchmarking for many years, the research will enable them to re-evaluate their own benchmarking approach and consider if rapid benchmarking could be used for some projects, particularly for internal benchmarking where it is easier to apply.

Originality/value

This research is the first to identify and document a rapid benchmarking approach and the first to provide a detailed analysis of the length of time it takes to undertake best practice benchmarking projects (and each stage of a benchmarking project).

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Ahmad Abdullah Al Nuseirat, Zeyad Mohammad El Kahlout, Ahmed Abbas, Dotun Adebanjo, Prattana Punnakitikashem and Robin Mann

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a benchmarking project carried out by the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) as part of a structured benchmarking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a benchmarking project carried out by the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) as part of a structured benchmarking initiative. The project was based on the TRADE benchmarking methodology and this paper examines the tools, activities and outcomes that relate to each stage of the adopted methodology.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on case study methodology. Data were collected from various sources including analysis of project reports written by DEWA’s benchmarking team reporting on their activities during the project. Data were also collected from four project presentations given at different stages of the project. In addition, the research team held three meetings with the DEWA benchmarking team at different stages of the benchmarking project.

Findings

The results show the key challenges and successes faced during each stage of the benchmarking project. It indicates the actions taken to overcome the challenges and the role played by internal and external stakeholders in facilitating the success of the benchmarking project.

Practical implications

The study presents information that would guide organisations that wish to carry out a benchmarking project – and particularly those implementing benchmarking for the first time. The study provides a summary of the key lessons learnt by DEWA’s benchmarking team as a guide for other organisations.

Originality/value

Academic research has not adequately examined and analysed the stage-by-stage elements of a benchmarking project from the perspective of the implementing organisation. This study addresses this gap by detailing and analysing the experiences of a benchmarking project by tracking the stage-by-stage activities of the benchmarking team.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Dotun Adebanjo, Robin Mann, Musli Mohammad and Salleh Ahmad Bareduan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the activities of the Asian Productivity Organisation (APO). The study identifies the various roles and activities of the APO…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the activities of the Asian Productivity Organisation (APO). The study identifies the various roles and activities of the APO and evaluates how well it performs in these roles. The study also investigates the impacts of the APO on the productivity initiatives of National Productivity Organisations (NPOs) in 16 Asian countries. These productivity initiatives are important in enhancing productivity performance and national competitiveness in the countries of interest.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collects data from stakeholders in the NPOs in 16 countries. A Likert-scale questionnaire was used to collect data from two types of respondents – NPO CEOs and NPO professional/technical staff. Data were analysed by comparing the responses across the participating countries.

Findings

The result shows that there was general satisfaction with the mission, vision and strategic direction of the APO. With respect to the operational performance of the organisation, the study showed that there were some differences in perception of the performance of the APO although the overall perception was positive.

Practical implications

The study provides insights into the top management of the APO with regards to deciding on the future direction of the organisation and, in particular, the ways in which it understands and supports the varied requirements of the different NPOs.

Originality/value

Organisations such as the APO dedicate significant resources into supporting NPOs, and by extension productivity-related commercial operations, in several countries. It is important to understand how these services are perceived and experienced in these countries, and a definitive study to examine this has not previously been carried out.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Robin Mann, Dotun Adebanjo, Ahmed Abbas, Zeyad Mohammad El Kahlout, Ahmad Abdullah Al Nuseirat and Hazza Khalfan Al Neaimi

This paper aims to investigate the mechanisms for managing coordinated benchmarking projects and the outcomes achieved from such coordination. While there have been many…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the mechanisms for managing coordinated benchmarking projects and the outcomes achieved from such coordination. While there have been many independent benchmarking studies comparing the practices and performance of public sector organisations, there has been little research on initiatives that involve coordinating multiple benchmarking projects within public sector organisations or report on the practices implemented and results from benchmarking projects. This research will be of interest to centralised authorities wishing to encourage and assist multiple organisations in undertaking benchmarking projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a case study methodology. Data were collected on the coordinating mechanisms and the experiences of the individual organisations over a one-year period.

Findings

The findings show successful results (financial and non-financial) across all 13 benchmarking projects, thus indicating the success of a coordinated approach to managing multiple projects. The study concluded by recommending a six-stage process for coordinating multiple benchmarking projects.

Originality/value

This research gives new insights into the application and benefits from benchmarking because of the open access the research team had to the “Dubai We Learn” initiative. To the authors’ knowledge the research was unique in being able to report accurately on the outcome of 13 benchmarking projects with all projects using the TRADE benchmarking methodology.

Details

International Journal of Excellence in Government, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-4384

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Jürgen P. Wagner, Nigel Grigg, Robin Mann and Musli Mohammad

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the basic problem of ingroup favoritism in a setting of high task interdependence is addressed through an intervention…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the basic problem of ingroup favoritism in a setting of high task interdependence is addressed through an intervention strategy combining different approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on evidence from extensive field-based case research. It focuses on the holistic description of a single high-performance logistics setting and discusses the distinct but interrelated managerial approaches against the backdrop of behavioral theory.

Findings

Most notably, the authors examine how culturally specific factors such as people’s social ingroup-outgroup categorization is reduced through a continual rotation of jobs. Work relationships are purposefully depersonalized and consequently socially reframed through reference to the corporate philosophy. Likewise, behaviors, roles and responsibilities are redefined based on a purposeful reinterpretation of the corporate philosophy. The authors evaluate these desired behaviors against the background of the perceptions of work group members and describe how these guide actual behaviors.

Practical implications

The insights of this study exemplify how adverse behavioral effects that may occur in some socio-cultural contexts may be avoided through the appropriate design of operations.

Originality/value

This study employs a holistic approach to provide valuable insights into both practitioners and academics in the field of OM to counteract detrimental behavioral effects in real-world operations.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Max Saunders, Robin S. Mann and Nigel P. Grigg

The purpose of this paper is to examine the international use of business excellence (BE) models and the practices used by BE framework (BEF) custodians to encourage use.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the international use of business excellence (BE) models and the practices used by BE framework (BEF) custodians to encourage use.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review, three surveys, a series of focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted. The study involved input from 16 countries and was part of a larger study of how BEFs are designed, reviewed, promoted and deployed within and across nations.

Findings

Only two of 16 BEF custodians had a formal measurement system in place to objectively measure the use of BEF by organisations over time. The use of the Australian BEF was lower than previously estimated at 1.3 percent and global use between 4 and 15 percent of organisations. The three most effective practices for assisting organisations in applying BE were tours of best or good practice organisations, publications on BE, and on‐line service/database of BE information.

Research limitations/implications

While the primary focus was on the Australian context, the findings draw upon a range of international sources and hence are of relevance to all BEF custodians.

Practical implications

The findings from the project were used to redesign the ABEF, and are expected to help inform national BE strategies worldwide.

Originality/value

The paper updates the current situation regarding the utilisation of BE in 16 countries, with a focus on Australia.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Robin Mann and Dennis Kehoe

The importance of tailoring TQM to the specific needs oforganizations is well known. Shows the findings of a research programmethat investigated which organizational…

Abstract

The importance of tailoring TQM to the specific needs of organizations is well known. Shows the findings of a research programme that investigated which organizational factors are important to consider when implementing TQM. Questionnaires and structured interviews, involving the participation of over 200 companies, were used as the main tools for the investigation. Identifies as a result, seven prime factors affecting the implementation of TQM: process factors, type of employees, shared values, management style, organizational structure, number of employees and industrial relations. Recommends that organizations should give these factors special consideration when developing their TQM approaches, and provides a guideline to show how these factors are likely to affect the implementation of TQM.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Robin Mann and Dennis Kehoe

Research was undertaken on the effects of quality improvement activitieson business performance. The investigation began by developing aclassification system to ensure all…

Abstract

Research was undertaken on the effects of quality improvement activities on business performance. The investigation began by developing a classification system to ensure all business performance benefits (tangible and intangible) were included for analysis. Questionnaires and structured interviews, involving the participation of over 200 companies, were used as the main tools for the investigation. An analysis of the results enabled a TQM quality activity model to be developed which classify 65 quality activities by their prime effect. This model was designed to assist companies in the planning of TQM and the targeting of quality activities. The research identified the difficulties organizations and researchers have in measuring the effects of quality activities.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Nihal P. Jayamaha, Nigel P. Grigg and Robin S. Mann

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the validity of Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (CPE) for New Zealand organisations and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the validity of Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (CPE) for New Zealand organisations and to identify methodological gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of data collected from a sample of 91 New Zealand organisations, through a self‐assessment instrument (as a proxy for the CPE) a structural equation model was studied using the partial least squares method. The measurement validity of the CPE as well as the implied causal relationships in the CPE framework was tested. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to gain additional insights.

Findings

The measurement validity of the CPE was established; of the 13 implied causal relationships in the CPE framework, 11 were statistically significant, which compared favourably with past studies. The results endorse some salient features of quality management: reliance on measurement, analysis, and knowledge management; the involvement of people; and the role of leadership in setting direction.

Research limitations/implications

As the study was based on a small sample, this model needs to be tested with other data sets. The study revealed the need to meta‐analyse past measurement and structural models as well as measurement instruments.

Practical implications

The study endorsed the reliability and validity of a well designed, well administered, self‐assessment instrument.

Originality/value

As the first New Zealand CPE validity study, the paper introduces the partial least squares method and shows some of its relevant versatile features, introducing some measurement perspectives not conceptualised before in CPE validation studies.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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