Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Tanya M. Cassidy

Many researchers who have studied drinking in Ireland have worked under the assumption that the Irish have a particularly acute problem with alcohol. Through an…

Abstract

Many researchers who have studied drinking in Ireland have worked under the assumption that the Irish have a particularly acute problem with alcohol. Through an investigation of historical and contemporary writings on the subject I demonstrate that the problem is more complicated than traditional images would lead one to believe. Generally it is not known that Ireland has one of the lowest rates of alcohol consumption in Europe and one of the highest percentages of abstainers, although it is also true that Ireland has one of the highest hospital admission rates for alcohol‐related illnesses. In an attempt to understand the complex variety of drinking behaviours in Ireland, I advocate the reinterpretation and use of the concept of ambivalence in the context of Irish drinking, adapting ideas of Barth (originally applied to Bah) in the process.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Robin Room

Psychoactive substances take on many symbolic meanings, and thus the politics of psychoactive substances has featured symbolic elements, or value-based rationality…

Abstract

Psychoactive substances take on many symbolic meanings, and thus the politics of psychoactive substances has featured symbolic elements, or value-based rationality, alongside and often dominating instrumental rationality. Drawing particularly on the work of Joseph Gusfield and Nordic scholars, the chapter considers the symbolic dimension in the politics of substance use, even in Nordic countries celebrated for their societal commitment to knowledge-based policymaking, and its effects on the interplay of science and policy.

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2014

Anne-Marie Laslett, Robin Room and Paul Dietze

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the diagnosis of both carers’ mental health problems and substance misuse increase the likelihood of recurrent child…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the diagnosis of both carers’ mental health problems and substance misuse increase the likelihood of recurrent child maltreatment over and above the individual effects of these factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective secondary data analysis of 29,455 children where child maltreatment was confirmed in the Victorian child protection system between 2001 and 2005. Recorded mental health, alcohol misuse and other drug misuse variables were entered into multivariate logistic regression models predicting repeated child maltreatment. Interactions and a range of other child, carer and socio-economic factors were included in these models.

Findings

Carer alcohol misuse, other drug misuse and mental ill health all independently predicted recurrent child maltreatment. The presence of both other drug misuse and mental ill health increased the likelihood that recurrent child abuse was recorded over the likelihood that mental health alone predicted recurrent child maltreatment, and while alcohol misuse had an effect when there was no mental health condition recorded it did not have an additional effect when there was evidence of mental health problems.

Research limitations/implications

Children in families where there is both mental health problems and other drug use problems are at greater risk of repeated maltreatment than where there is evidence of mental health problems or other drug use alone. Where there was evidence of carer mental health problems, alcohol misuse did not add to this likelihood. However, the effect of mental health and other drug use was similar in size to the effect of alcohol misuse alone.

Originality/value

These findings add to understandings of the effects of co-occurring mental health problems and substance misuse on recurrent child maltreatment and differentiate between cases that involve alcohol and other drug misuse.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Blaine Stothard

The purpose of this paper is to inform readers of developments in drug policy debate in Australia following the publication of the Global Commission Report. To explain the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform readers of developments in drug policy debate in Australia following the publication of the Global Commission Report. To explain the activities, discussions and findings of events organised by the Australian NGO Australia21. To provide some key contextual information and references.

Design/methodology/approach

Overview of international situation following publication of Global Commission Report. Summary of current Australian national policy and its origins. Summary of recent national reports and their impact on policy. Account of NGO reports and recommendations.

Findings

Civil society agencies have entered national debate on drug policy and recommended an abandonment of prohibition-based approaches, using the Global Commission Report as a catalyst. First steps have been taken to introduce this debate into the Australian parliament.

Research limitations/implications

Incomplete knowledge of relevant national documentation.

Practical implications

Probable delay in government developing debate and acting on recommendations in an election year.

Originality/value

Case study of developments and debate in one jurisdiction resulting from Global Commission Report. Aligns with similar debate and moves in other nations. Adds to knowledge of developments which challenge existing international policy debate and practical approaches which reject prohibition.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Gabor Kelemen and Monika Andrea Mark

Since the Jellinekian Foundation of modern alcohol studies 75 years ago, no one has yet systematically studied the role of his ethnographic studies, his university…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the Jellinekian Foundation of modern alcohol studies 75 years ago, no one has yet systematically studied the role of his ethnographic studies, his university attendance and engagement in psychoanalytic work leading to the birth of his first book (published in 1917), which applied an ethnographic approach. The purpose of this paper is to uncover and show the ethnographic, experimental psychological and psychoanalytic roots in Jellinek’s different models of alcohol problems, from the conventional medical one, though the Alcoholics Anonymous-inspired concept, to the species of alcoholism theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the data from their research in the archives of Budapest, Berlin, Leipzig and Grenoble, the authors examine Jellinek’s scientific output in alcohol studies. They focus on data related to Jellinek’s activity in statistics, ethnography including field work and the business model of psychoanalysis.

Findings

Drawing from various traditions of science, Jellinek acquired considerable sources of knowledge with the help of his friends and teachers during his formative years, which later led him to renew and transform his models of alcohol problems. New data on Jellinek’s personal history, a by-product of the archival research, is also presented.

Practical implications

The Jellinekian heritage, including his cross-fertilisation approach, represents a vast reserve for addiction science.

Originality/value

This paper not only adds to the understanding of the history of addiction, but might also lead to a rearranging of our knowledge about the founder of the field.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Alfred Uhl, Julian Strizek, Blaine Stothard, Axel Klein and Aysel Sultan

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Gary D. Barber and Carol Burroughs

While few college students are majoring in history today, perhaps the field is not as close to extinction as some people fear. Professional historians continue to delve…

Abstract

While few college students are majoring in history today, perhaps the field is not as close to extinction as some people fear. Professional historians continue to delve into various historical nooks and crannies and are busy planning future endeavors. A collection of articles in two 1981 issues of the Journal of Interdisciplinary History explores a variety of recent historiographical developments. These state‐of‐the‐art essays cover economic, intellectual and population history, the history of science, political history, family history, biography, and quantification. They are must reading for anyone interested in knowing where historical studies are headed during the remaining two decades of the 20th century.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Terry C. Blum and Paul M. Roman

Since the early 1970s work‐based interventions to deal with the emotional problems of workers arising from the workplace have emerged from the practitioner community…

Abstract

Since the early 1970s work‐based interventions to deal with the emotional problems of workers arising from the workplace have emerged from the practitioner community. “Employee Assistance Programmes” (EAPs) have developed principally in the US and other English‐speaking cultures. A descriptive analysis of the emergence of EAPs in the US and the attempt by Australians to transfer this technology to Australia, the structure of that effort and apparent reasons for its eventual stagnation is presented. It points to the relative importance of government agencies, programme development specialists and treatment delivery agencies in programme adoption and implementation. It is evident that employers are working to demonstrate interest in employee health in terms of its impact on productivity and performance and its effects on the costs of health care. These developments are not limited to the USA. As a multinational phenomenon, employer involvement has an open‐ended potential for subtle forms of social control.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000