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Article

Herbert Altrichter, Stephen Kemmis, Robin McTaggart and Ortrun Zuber‐Skerritt

Action research has been recognised for its breadth as a field of research practice and its depth as a discourse of theoretical insight. It does not have one neat, widely…

Abstract

Action research has been recognised for its breadth as a field of research practice and its depth as a discourse of theoretical insight. It does not have one neat, widely accepted definition. Points to some reasons for the difficulty of formulating a generally accepted definition of action research, and argues why action research should not be confined but should be both clarified for communication and open for development. The discussion stems from a working definition developed with participants in an international symposium that serves as a classic definition of action research. Presents several alternative approaches to resolution and argues for a judicious mix of pragmatism and flexibility in approaching the definition issue.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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Abstract

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Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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Article

Judi Marshall and Peter Reason

The paper aims to offer the notion of “taking an attitude of inquiry” as a quality process in research, enabling researchers to be aware of and articulate the complex…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to offer the notion of “taking an attitude of inquiry” as a quality process in research, enabling researchers to be aware of and articulate the complex processes of interpretation, reflection and action they engage in. The purpose is to consider this as a quality process that complements more procedural approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on 25 years experience in an action research community – in which the authors have developed theory and practice in the company of colleagues – to articulate and illustrate what “taking an attitude of inquiry” can mean. The paper seeks to make quality practices thus developed available to a wider community of researchers.

Findings

Two schema with illustrations are offered. Qualities that enable taking an attitude of inquiry are suggested: curiosity, willingness to articulate and explore purposes, humility, participation and radical empiricism. Disciplines of inquiring practice are identified as: paying attention to framing and its pliability; enabling participation to generate high quality knowing, appreciating issues of power; working with multiple ways of knowing; and engaging in, and explicating, research as an emergent process.

Research limitations/implications

Research is depicted as both disciplined and alive. Researchers are invited to engage fully in self‐reflective practice to enhance quality and validity.

Originality/value

An articulation of a depth view of quality in self‐reflective research practice which has been developed in an action research context and can be applied to research more generally.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Ortrun Zuber‐Skerritt and Mary Farquhar

This paper is an edited version of an interview that presents information and insight into the background of ALARPM (action learning, action research and process…

Abstract

This paper is an edited version of an interview that presents information and insight into the background of ALARPM (action learning, action research and process management) not only as a field but also as a worldwide network association, thus facilitating understanding of the evolution and nature of these three concepts. The interviewee’s responses reflect her personal perspective, informed by both life experience and a theoretical framework that conceives of ALARPM first as a philosophy, a theory of learning and a methodology, and second as a method and technique.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article

Robin Selzer and Todd Foley

The purpose of this paper is to implement diversity and inclusion practices in an USA university department through the application of a cultural audit in the style of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to implement diversity and inclusion practices in an USA university department through the application of a cultural audit in the style of participatory action research (PAR). The cultural audit process demonstrates an inclusive, grassroots approach to creating actionable solutions that brings about positive organizational change and can be replicated by others.

Design/methodology/approach

The version of an organizational cultural audit described here included two phases. The first was quantitative in nature, using a survey to collect data that would provide the organization with a perspective of how its culture is perceived (Fletcher and Jones, 1992) and serve as the basis for the second, more crucial phase. The second phase utilized PAR qualitative approach. Having data presented in aggregate form allows for truer reactions to how others believe they experience the work environment, as opposed to making assumptions about how others may experience the work environment. A cultural audit such as this relies heavily upon the qualitative narrative that is exposed when participants react to the quantitative data presented. In fact, the real assessment begins not with the quantitative data collection process, but with the presentation of the quantitative data and the analysis of how participants respond to what they see.

Findings

The researchers found social and practical implications for empowering employees to develop a culturally agile organization. Results showed that participants generally viewed the culture as lacking transparency and needing values-based guidelines for everyday interactions. Participants thought they should value diversity, but viewed the culture as having a gap in solutions to apply that value. Incentivizing actions that promote diversity and inclusion and better shared governance were needed to address cultural problems in the organization. Recommendations for actionable solutions included: developing shared language through a values statement, restructuring onboarding and mentoring support, increasing transparency of standing committee work, membership, and minutes to foster trust and communication, implementing group guidelines for respectful interactions, and the creation of regular, planned social events to enhance human relations. This case study is significant because it uses an innovative method to not only study diversity and inclusion in a university setting, but also take action, thereby filling a gap in the literature on critical studies of organizations.

Research limitations/implications

For those trying to institute a similar experience for their organization, it would be important to note that the cultural audit was a grassroots intervention, designed to help the division discern what kinds of lived experiences and shared assumptions exist within.

Practical implications

The case study presented should serve as a roadmap for how individuals can garner support for conducting a similar cultural audit with their own organizations.

Originality/value

This case study is significant because it uses an innovative method to not only study diversity in a university setting, but also take action, thereby filling a gap in the literature on critical studies of organizations.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Book part

Chris Rowell, Robin Gustafsson and Marco Clemente

We argue that our understanding of how institutions matter has been undermined by a piecemeal approach to temporality in institutional analyses. This paper addresses this…

Abstract

We argue that our understanding of how institutions matter has been undermined by a piecemeal approach to temporality in institutional analyses. This paper addresses this shortcoming in the literature. We bring temporality to the fore by conceptualizing practices, which constitute institutions, as understood, situated, and coordinated in time by temporal structures. We elaborate an integrated framework of temporal structures that consist of three types: temporal patterns, temporal conceptions, and temporal orientations – and outline how each type contributes to the reproduction of practices. We discuss the implications of this framework for sustainability initiatives and conclude by suggesting future avenues of research on the temporal foundations of institutions.

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Article

Robin Roslender and Susan J. Hart

The purpose of this paper is to identify brand management accounting as a further approach to accounting for brands and to suggest a number of possible measurement metrics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify brand management accounting as a further approach to accounting for brands and to suggest a number of possible measurement metrics it might incorporate.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is discursive in nature, developing a critique of existing approaches to accounting for brands before considering a number of attributes of a new approach.

Findings

The growing importance of brands as a key source of competitive advantage has been among the most visible changes in many business organisations in recent years. Effective strategic brand management, therefore, poses a major challenge to both accountants and their marketing colleagues. To date, the history of accounting for brands has largely been concerned with the derivation of brand valuations suitable for financial accounting and reporting purposes. Although the merits of a management accounting perspective on brands have been recognised for some time, recent studies indicate that to date it has failed to attract much support. New approaches to accounting for brands are now required. Underpinned by high levels of interfunctional cooperation between management accounting and marketing management practitioners, brand management accounting examplifies the more inclusive approach to the task of strategic management increasingly evident within contemporary organisations.

Originality/value

The paper integrates both existing and new insights informed by the accounting and marketing literatures in an attempt to promote a further approach to the task of accounting for brands.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article

So far as the London activities of librarianship are concerned, the Winter opened propitiously when Mr. J. D. Stewart and Mr. J. Wilks addressed a goodly audience at…

Abstract

So far as the London activities of librarianship are concerned, the Winter opened propitiously when Mr. J. D. Stewart and Mr. J. Wilks addressed a goodly audience at Chaucer House, Mr. Stewart on American, and Mr. Wilks on German libraries. There was a live air about the meeting which augured well for the session. The chief librarians of London were well represented, and we hope that they will continue the good work. It was the last meeting over which Mr. George R. Bolton presided as Chairman of the London and Home Counties Branch, and he is succeeded by Mr. Wilks. Mr. Bolton has carried his office with thorough and forceful competence, and London library workers have every reason to be grateful. The election to chairmanship of the librarian of University College, London, gives the Branch for the first time a non‐municipal librarian to preside. The change has not been premature, and, apart from that question, Mr. Wilks is cultured, modest and eloquent and will do honour to his position.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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