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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Robin Gauld

The purpose of this paper is to outline the theory and practice of governance for integrated care, using the case of New Zealand’s healthcare alliances.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the theory and practice of governance for integrated care, using the case of New Zealand’s healthcare alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

This is descriptive analysis.

Findings

Alliance governance provides considerable scope for bringing health professional together to focus on whole system approaches to care design. As such, it facilitates care integration.

Research limitations/implications

This is a descriptive review.

Originality/value

Descriptions of alliance governance in New Zealand and in general are rare in the literature. This paper fills this gap.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Robin Gauld, Simon Horsburgh, Maureen Alice Flynn, Deirdre Carey and Philip Crowley

Clinical governance (CG) is an important foundation for a high-performing health care system, with many countries supporting its development. CG policy may be developed…

1165

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical governance (CG) is an important foundation for a high-performing health care system, with many countries supporting its development. CG policy may be developed and implemented nationally, or devolved to a local level, with implications for the overall approach to implementation and policy uptake. However, it is not known whether one of these two approaches is more effective. The purpose of this paper is to probe this question. Its setting is Ireland and New Zealand, two broadly comparable countries with similar CG policies. Ireland’s was nationally led, while New Zealand’s was devolved to local districts. This leads to the question of whether these different approaches to implementation make a difference.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from surveys of health professionals in both countries were used to compare performance with CG development.

Findings

The study showed that Ireland’s approach produced a slightly better performance, raising questions about the merits of devolving responsibility for policy implementation to the local level.

Research limitations/implications

The Irish and New Zealand surveys both had lower-than-desirable response rates, which is not uncommon for studies of health professionals such as this. The low response rates mean the findings may be subject to selection bias.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of the question of whether a national or local approach to policy implementation is more effective, few studies specifically focus on this, meaning that this study provides a new contribution to the topic.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Gareth H. Rees and Robin Gauld

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the effects of the introduction of lean into healthcare workplaces, phenomena that have not been widely investigated.

1422

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the effects of the introduction of lean into healthcare workplaces, phenomena that have not been widely investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on discussions and findings from the literature. It seeks to bring the few geographically dispersed experiences and case studies together to draw some conclusions regarding lean’s negative effects.

Findings

Two recurring themes emerge. The first is there is little evidence of Lean’s impact on work and the people who perform it. The literature therefore suggests that we understand very little about how work conditions are changed and how Lean’s negative effects arise and may be managed in healthcare workplaces. A second observation is that Lean’s effects are ambiguous. For some Lean seems to intensify work, while for others it leads to improved job satisfaction and productivity. Given this variety, the paper suggests a research emphasis on Lean’s socio-cultural side and to derive more data on how work and its processes change, particularly in the context of healthcare team-working.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that without improved understanding of social contexts of Lean interventions its value for healthcare improvement may be limited. Future research should also include a focus on how the work is changed and whether high-performance work system practices may be used to offset Lean’s negative effects.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Kimberly Cousins, Robin Gauld and Richard Greatbanks

Healthcare alliances are a mechanism for developing collaborative and integrated care governance and service delivery arrangements. Yet is not known how widespread…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare alliances are a mechanism for developing collaborative and integrated care governance and service delivery arrangements. Yet is not known how widespread alliance arrangements are in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, how alliances function or how effective they are. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of alliances in OECD countries, including key areas covered and how performance is measured.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured narrative review of literature published between 2010 and 2018 was undertaken, focussed on OECD countries. The literature included peer-reviewed articles as well as publications from key policy analysis organisations.

Findings

Many OECD countries have implemented integrated care models but only a small number had explicitly adopted health alliances that link primary and secondary providers under joint governance arrangements. Most alliances are pilot initiatives and not broadly adopted. Most had not adopted a unified performance measurement framework.

Practical implications

Policy makers and service providers interested in joint governance arrangements that support integration must consider the range of potential options overviewed in this paper, as well as how to create supportive performance measurement frameworks.

Originality/value

This is the first narrative review of alliance arrangements in OECD countries. It provides an overview of arrangements, while illustrating that there is considerable scope for further alliance development.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Robin Gauld and Simon Horsburgh

The work environment is known to influence professional attitudes toward quality and safety. This study sought to measure these attitudes amongst health professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

The work environment is known to influence professional attitudes toward quality and safety. This study sought to measure these attitudes amongst health professionals working in New Zealand District Health Boards (DHBs), initially in 2012 and again in 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

Three questions were included in a national New Zealand health professional workforce survey conducted in 2012 and again in 2017. All registered health professionals employed with DHBs were invited to participate in an online survey. Areas of interest included teamwork amongst professionals; involvement of patients and families in efforts to improve patient care and ease of speaking up when a problem with patient care is perceived.

Findings

In 2012, 57% of respondents (58% in 2017) agreed health professionals worked as a team; 71% respondents (73% in 2017) agreed health professionals involved patients and families in efforts to improve patient care and 69% (65% in 2017) agreed it was easy to speak up in their clinical area, with none of these changes being statistically significant. There were some response differences by respondent characteristics.

Practical implications

With no change over time, there is a demand for improvement. Also for leadership in policy, management and amongst health professionals if goals of improving quality and safety are to be delivered upon.

Originality/value

This study provides a simple three-question method of probing perceptions of quality and safety and an important set of insights into progress in New Zealand DHBs.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Robin Gauld

This article reviews New Zealand's journey through managing Covid-19. It provides a chronological overview of key developments. The article analyses the impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

This article reviews New Zealand's journey through managing Covid-19. It provides a chronological overview of key developments. The article analyses the impacts of Covid-19 on business and society and offers lessons for others from the New Zealand case.

Design/methodology/approach

The article draws on various sources, primarily media pieces and government information. It also critically analyses and interprets the New Zealand response.

Findings

The initial onset and response from the New Zealand government, albeit with closed borders, was effective in terms of keeping the country relatively Covid free. The country was slow to introduce vaccinations, but the uptake was swift. A vaccine mandate to coincide with a Delta outbreak was controversial. Importantly, the New Zealand case is characterised by political leadership strongly and explicitly informed by public health expertise and advice which was routinely demonstrated throughout the period in discussion.

Originality/value

The article offers an important overview and analysis of New Zealand's experience with Covid-19 and its response, with particular focus on the way in which the government and public health specialist advisors interacted.

Details

Public Administration and Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1727-2645

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Peter Littlejohns, Katharina Kieslich, Albert Weale, Emma Tumilty, Georgina Richardson, Tim Stokes, Robin Gauld and Paul Scuffham

In order to create sustainable health systems, many countries are introducing ways to prioritise health services underpinned by a process of health technology assessment…

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Abstract

Purpose

In order to create sustainable health systems, many countries are introducing ways to prioritise health services underpinned by a process of health technology assessment. While this approach requires technical judgements of clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness, these are embedded in a wider set of social (societal) value judgements, including fairness, responsiveness to need, non-discrimination and obligations of accountability and transparency. Implementing controversial decisions faces legal, political and public challenge. To help generate acceptance for the need for health prioritisation and the resulting decisions, the purpose of this paper is to develop a novel way of encouraging key stakeholders, especially patients and the public, to become involved in the prioritisation process.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a multidisciplinary collaboration involving a series of international workshops, ethical and political theory (including accountability for reasonableness) have been applied to develop a practical way forward through the creation of a values framework. The authors have tested this framework in England and in New Zealand using a mixed-methods approach.

Findings

A social values framework that consists of content and process values has been developed and converted into an online decision-making audit tool.

Research limitations/implications

The authors have developed an easy to use method to help stakeholders (including the public) to understand the need for prioritisation of health services and to encourage their involvement. It provides a pragmatic way of harmonising different perspectives aimed at maximising health experience.

Practical implications

All health care systems are facing increasing demands within finite resources. Although many countries are introducing ways to prioritise health services, the decisions often face legal, political, commercial and ethical challenge. The research will help health systems to respond to these challenges.

Social implications

This study helps in increasing public involvement in complex health challenges.

Originality/value

No other groups have used this combination of approaches to address this issue.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Stuart Barson, Robin Gauld, Jonathon Gray, Goran Henriks, Christina Krause, Peter Lachman, Lynne Maher, M. Rashad Massoud, Lee Mathias, Mike Wagner and Luis Villa

The purpose of this paper is to identify five quality improvement initiatives for healthcare system leaders, produced by such leaders themselves, and to provide some…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify five quality improvement initiatives for healthcare system leaders, produced by such leaders themselves, and to provide some guidance on how these could be implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-stage modified-Delphi process was used, blending the Delphi approach of iterative information collection, analysis and feedback, with the option for participants to revise their judgments.

Findings

The process reached consensus on five initiatives: change information privacy laws; overhaul professional training and work in the workplace; use co-design methods; contract for value and outcomes across health and social care; and use data from across the public and private sectors to improve equity for vulnerable populations and the sickest people.

Research limitations/implications

Information could not be gathered from all participants at each stage of the modified-Delphi process, and the participants did not include patients and families, potentially limiting the scope and nature of input.

Practical implications

The practical implications are a set of findings based on what leaders would bring to a decision-making table in an ideal world if given broad scope and capacity to make policy and organisational changes to improve healthcare systems.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature a suite of recommendations for healthcare quality improvement, produced by a group of experienced healthcare system leaders from a range of contexts.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Stuart Barson, Fiona Doolan-Noble, Jonathon Gray and Robin Gauld

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contextual factors contributing to the sustainability of healthcare quality improvement (QI) initiatives.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contextual factors contributing to the sustainability of healthcare quality improvement (QI) initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Themes from semi-structured interviews with international healthcare leaders are compared with Kaplan and Provost et al.’s (2012) model for understanding success in quality (MUSIQ). Critical success factors within these themes are shown in detail.

Findings

The interviews provide a rich source of information on critical success factors. The themes largely correspond with MUSIQ, reinforcing its robustness. An important factor emerging from the interviews was the importance of engagement with patients and families in QI, and this needs consideration in seeking to understand context in QI.

Research limitations/implications

Interview participants represent a limited set of western countries and health systems. Their experiences may not hold true in other settings.

Practical implications

The detail on critical success factors provides QI practitioners with guidance on designing and implementing sustainable initiatives.

Originality/value

Including consideration of contextual factors for engagement with patients and families in frameworks for context in QI appears to be an original idea that will add value to such frameworks. Researchers in patient engagement are starting to address contextual factors and connections should be made with this work.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Onalenna Stannie Seitio-Kgokgwe, Robin Gauld, Philip C. Hill and Pauline Barnett

The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse human resource management (HRM) practices, and make recommendations to improve employee and health system outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from a large study that used a mixed methods approach to assess performance of Botswana’s Ministry of Health (MOH). It uses data collected through document analysis and in-depth interviews of 54 key informants comprising policy makers, senior staff of the MOH and its stakeholder organizations.

Findings

Public health sector HRM in Botswana has experienced inadequate planning, poor deployment and underutilization of staff. Lack of comprehensive retention strategies and poor working conditions contributed to the failure to attract and retain skilled personnel. Relationships with both formal and informal environments affected HRM performance.

Research limitations/implications

While document review was a major source of data for this paper, the weaknesses in the human resource information system limited availability of data.

Practical implications

This paper presents an argument for the need for consideration of formal and informal environments in developing effective HRM strategies.

Originality/value

This research provides a rare system-wide approach to health HRM in a Sub-Saharan African country. It contributes to the literature and evidence needed to guide HRM policy decisions and practices

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

1 – 10 of 35