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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Sudhir H. Kale, Robin D. Pentecost and Natalina Zlatevska

Joseph Pine and Jim Gilmore coined the term “experience economy” to describe a paradigm shift in consumption. To survive in this new economy, businesses must provide customers…

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Abstract

Purpose

Joseph Pine and Jim Gilmore coined the term “experience economy” to describe a paradigm shift in consumption. To survive in this new economy, businesses must provide customers with memorable consumption experiences. The purpose of this paper is to suggest eight ingredients that need to be incorporated into a compelling experience. Commercial experience providers, not‐for‐profit organizations, and political entities stand to benefit by integrating these elements in the experiences they provide to their targeted constituencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative phenomenological case study approach is employed using the 2008 Democratic National Convention as the referent for dissemination of a compelling experience.

Findings

Eight attributes were distilled that together constitute an unforgettable experience: planning, resourcing, targeting, anticipating, enabling, empathizing, framing, and engaging.

Practical implications

All experience providers desirous of creating compelling customer experiences for their targeted audiences would find it worthwhile to actively incorporate each of these elements in their product.

Originality/value

The paper uses a well‐planned and well‐executed political convention to uncover the building blocks of a compelling consumer experience.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Leo Jago and Jack Carlsen

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Robin Pentecost, Denni Arli and Sharyn Thiele

The purpose of this paper is to investigate barriers to pro-social behaviour in the form of blood donating using self-determination theory.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate barriers to pro-social behaviour in the form of blood donating using self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents were recruited through intercepts at a major international university and at points within the community in a capital city in Australia. Sampling was conducted over a three-week period resulting in a sample of 617 respondents.

Findings

Results show intrinsic motivations positively influence intentions towards blood donation, self-identity, and locus of control. Further, despite positively influencing other factors, external regulation positively influenced amotivation indicating the more likely people feel pressured to donate blood, the less likely they will be motivated to donate blood.

Originality/value

This would suggest one way to influence more people to become donors is to place greater focus on the positive emotional feelings they derive from the act of donating blood and the control they have over that donation. Using external regulation strategy which often suggests people “must” or “have-to” donate blood may be limiting blood donation numbers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2022

Md Ashaduzzaman, Charles Jebarajakirthy, Scott K. Weaven, Haroon Iqbal Maseeh, Manish Das and Robin Pentecost

Collaborative consumption (CC), a unique business model, provides several monetary and non-monetary benefits to customers. Several adapted theory of planned behaviour (TPB)-based…

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Abstract

Purpose

Collaborative consumption (CC), a unique business model, provides several monetary and non-monetary benefits to customers. Several adapted theory of planned behaviour (TPB)-based models were developed and tested to understand this consumption behaviour with the findings inconsistent and fragmented. Thus, this study aims to develop a general and consistent TPB model using a meta-analytic path analysis to better understand customers’ CC adoption behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 37 studies, a meta-analysis was performed adopting several analytical methods; bivariate analysis, moderation analysis and path analysis.

Findings

The universal TPB model shows that factors, that is, trust, attitude, perceived environmental responsibility and communication facilities, drive both perceived usefulness and CC. However, subjective norms, such as perceived behavioural control and emotional value, drive only perceived usefulness. Moderation analysis shows that the relationships between variables used in the proposed TPB model tends to vary depending on five moderators, that is, countries’ economic development level, type of CC, sample size, sample type and survey administration method.

Research limitations/implications

The consideration of only quantitative papers and papers written in English language in this meta-analysis may bias the study’s findings.

Practical implications

Based on the findings regarding important factors that consumers consider when adopting CC, this study provides insightful recommendations to companies facilitating CC.

Originality/value

By developing the universal TPB model, this study theoretically contributes to the TPB model, and by conducting the moderation test, the study contextually contributes to the TPB literature in the CC context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Denni Arli, Robin Pentecost and Park Thaichon

Despite the importance of sustainability, some conservative religious groups do not believe and support climate change. There is a continuous debate on the role of religion on…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the importance of sustainability, some conservative religious groups do not believe and support climate change. There is a continuous debate on the role of religion on people’s attitudes toward the environment. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to (1) explore the impact of consumers’ religious orientation on motivation and commitment toward recycling; (2) examine the impact of economic motivation, commitment and love for nature toward intention to recycle; (3) investigate the mediating effect of motivation, commitment and love for nature on the relationship between consumer religiosity and their intention to recycle; and (4) examine the impact of consumers’ intention toward its subsequent behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Using convenience sampling methods, participants were recruited through an online survey platform (MTurk). The total completed respondents are 827 participants.

Findings

The results show consumers’ religiousness influence their motivation, commitment and love for nature. This study shows that consumers with high intrinsic and extrinsic religiousness are more likely to be motivated by economic motivation. Being religious does not make consumers more environmentally friendly.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not separate religion and between religious and non-religious consumers. Each religion may perceive environments differently. Future research may investigate each religion separately.

Originality/value

This paper has several contributions: (1) it contributes to the debate on the impact of religiousness on consumers’ attitudes toward sustainable-related behavior such as recycling. Does it matter? (2) the results show the most effective way to increase people’s intention to recycle; and (3) the results of this study will have implications for government, religious institutions on how to increase positive attitude toward the environment especially among religious consumers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Robin Pentecost, Suné Donoghue and Park Thaichon

Using the millennial cohort the purpose of this paper is to assess differences in shopping mall behaviour between three intra-cohorts groups: adolescents (13–17), emerging adults…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the millennial cohort the purpose of this paper is to assess differences in shopping mall behaviour between three intra-cohorts groups: adolescents (13–17), emerging adults (18–23) and young adults (24–30+).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a self-administered questionnaire, respondents were recruited through random customer intercepts at a major shopping mall in a capital city in Australia using a team of trained research assistants. After initial descriptive between group examinations, discriminant analysis was applied to verify group membership.

Findings

Results show significant differences between groups. Attitudes based upon mall attributes varied significantly, along with expenditure and other behaviour. The study provides evidence of transitional differences within a generational cohort as mall consumers mature.

Research limitations/implications

It serves as a focus for researchers to more actively consider intra-cohort segmentation relating to other generational cohorts.

Practical implications

Findings show that emerging adults to be moving away from attending the mall, which means, this group may be lost if retailers are not more proactive in attracting them or at least maintaining them. Coupling this with the group’s transition towards young adulthood, and the fact that these young adults are less likely to go to the mall there is a degree of urgency to develop strategies to keep this transition group engaged if financially feasible.

Originality/value

This research is important to ongoing theoretical perspectives of cohort theory and life cycle positions through its application to a more nuanced examination of the millennials cohort.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Sunita Prugsamatz, Robin Pentecost and Lars Ofstad

This study aims to extend the knowledge and literature on which information sources influences (explicit service promises such as advertising, personal selling; implicit service…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend the knowledge and literature on which information sources influences (explicit service promises such as advertising, personal selling; implicit service promises such as tangibles and price; past experiences; word of mouth; image and reputation) Chinese students’ expectations of overseas universities’ service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from undergraduate Chinese students from two universities in Australia. A total of 133 questionnaires were returned for data analysis. Factor analysis and multiple analysis of variance were conducted for this study.

Findings

Results indicate the three most influential sources of information on Chinese students expectations of universities are: past experiences, advertising and word of mouth. Findings suggest that the more explicit and implicit service promises the respondent is exposed to; the higher the desired and predicted expectations of the university's service quality. However their level of expectations (both desired and predicted) is considerably greater when exposed to explicit service promises.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study includes the results obtained as not necessarily generalisable or applicable to other cultures (for instance Europeans). Future research could examine Chinese students’ formation of expectations based on other factors such as human values.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this study consists of applying and extending Zeithaml et al.'s model, that proposes that a customer's level of expectations is dependent on several antecedents, within a higher education (pre‐purchase) context using a Chinese sample. The main managerial implication is that measuring the influence of information sources on Chinese students will provide universities with more effective ways of targeting Chinese consumers with their marketing communication campaigns.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Sameeullah Khan, Asif Iqbal Fazili and Irfan Bashir

This paper aims to theorize counterfeit luxury consumption among millennials from a generational identity perspective.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorize counterfeit luxury consumption among millennials from a generational identity perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes and tests a model of counterfeit buying behavior using an online survey of 467 millennial respondents. The study uses multi-item measures from the extant literature and uses the structural equation modeling technique to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal when millennials have a self-defining relationship with their generation, they tend to internalize the generational norm pertaining to counterfeit luxury consumption. Millennials’ counterfeit related values: market mavenism, postmodernism, schadenfreude and public self-consciousness contribute to their generational identity. Moreover, market mavenism, cool consumption and public self-consciousness establish counterfeit luxury consumption as a generational norm.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper suggest that the expertise and influence of market mavens can be used to deter counterfeit consumption. Moreover, luxury brands must communicate a cool image to offset the rebellious image of counterfeits. Further, from a standardization versus adaption standpoint, the generational perspective allows for the standardization of anti-counterfeiting campaigns.

Originality/value

The paper makes a novel contribution to the counterfeiting literature by demonstrating that millennials pursue counterfeit luxury brands when they pledge cognitive allegiance to their generation. The paper, thus, extends the identity perspective of counterfeit luxury consumption to group contexts. The authors also test and validate the role of descriptive norms in group contexts by introducing the construct generational norm to counterfeiting literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2010

Abstract

Details

Choice Modelling: The State-of-the-art and The State-of-practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-773-8

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