Search results

1 – 10 of 91
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Robin Cowan and Nicolas Jonard

Network formation is often said to be driven by social capital considerations. A typical pattern observed in the empirical data on strategic alliances is that of…

Abstract

Network formation is often said to be driven by social capital considerations. A typical pattern observed in the empirical data on strategic alliances is that of small-world networks: dense subgroups of firms interconnected by (few) clique-spanning ties. The typical argument is that there is social capital value both to being embedded in a dense cluster, and to bridging disconnected clusters. In this chapter we develop and analyze a simple model of joint innovation where we are able to reproduce these features, based solely on the assumption that successful partnering demands some intermediate amount of technological similarity between the partners.

Details

Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Two core assumptions set network theory apart from other perspectives and direct research into specific strategic and organizational topics.

Abstract

Two core assumptions set network theory apart from other perspectives and direct research into specific strategic and organizational topics.

Details

Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Min Lin, Yi Wang and Guisheng Wu

The purpose of this paper is to find the specific competitive industries in emerging industries of strategic importance of each province in China in order to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find the specific competitive industries in emerging industries of strategic importance of each province in China in order to provide references for industrial cultivation and development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses quantitative analysis methods on RCA and R&D efficiency.

Findings

Different provinces have specific competitive emerging industries of strategic importance. Taking biotechnology, equipment manufacturing, and new generation of information technology industry as examples, this paper finds: for the advanced equipment manufacturing industry, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Guizhou, Tianjin, Liaoning, Heilongjiang and Jiangxi provinces have obvious characteristics and relatively high R&D efficiency; for bio‐technology, Jiangsu, Henan, Jiangxi, Hunan, Zhejiang and Shandong provinces have obvious characteristics and relatively high R&D efficiency; and for the next generation of the information technology industry, Jiangsu, Guangdong, Fujian, Beijing, Tianjin and Shanghai provinces have obvious characteristics and relatively high R&D efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by lack of industrial comprehensiveness so that more statistical data about emerging industry of strategic importance is needed for more in‐depth analysis.

Practical implications

The identification of specific competitive emerging industry of strategic importance of each province will give managers and policy makers train of thought for the cultivation and development of strategic emerging industry and make future policies more targeted.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the research on the differentiated cultivation and development tactics of strategic emerging industry by, respectively, finding out the specific competitive emerging industries of each province in China.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy in China, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-552X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Martin Stack and Myles Gartland

This paper, applies the concept of path creation to a historical case. Path creation arose in part as a response to perceived weaknesses regarding the limited role of firm…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper, applies the concept of path creation to a historical case. Path creation arose in part as a response to perceived weaknesses regarding the limited role of firm agency in the path dependency literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This essay uses the path creation methodology to explain why and how specific features of the American brewing industry's regulatory framework were devised during prohibition (1920‐1933) and implemented upon the repeal of prohibition in 1933. The study draws upon a series of primary sources, including firm publications and government reports.

Findings

It shows that path creation is a useful way to examine the design and implementation of industry‐level regulatory systems. It argues that rather than passively waiting and hoping for a beneficial set of rules, the largest national breweries in America actively set about to shape the regulatory environment in which they and their competitors operated.

Originality/value

The study is valuable on two levels. First, it helps explicate how and why the brewing industry's current regulatory system emerged. Second, and more broadly, it shows how the path creation thesis can be usefully adopted to interpret firm and managerial actions across time periods and industries.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Timothy B. Folta, Constance E. Helfat and Samina Karim

This paper introduces the volume on Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy, which is devoted to exploring a relatively new justification for how multi-business firms…

Abstract

This paper introduces the volume on Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy, which is devoted to exploring a relatively new justification for how multi-business firms create value – having flexibility to internally redistribute non-financial resources across their businesses. We clarify how a theory around resource flexibility differs from other theories of how multi-business firms create value. We then synthesize the collection of papers in this volume and describe how they contribute to this line of inquiry. Finally, we offer our own views on opportunities for elaboration of this theory.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Robin Ion, Sue Cowan and Ron Lindsay

The notion of mental health service user involvement in curriculum design and delivery has become commonplace over recent years. However, concern has been expressed that…

Abstract

The notion of mental health service user involvement in curriculum design and delivery has become commonplace over recent years. However, concern has been expressed that the rhetoric has not matched the reality. In particular, service user involvement has tended towards either tokenism or over‐sensitivity to the point of near inertia. By contrast, this paper describes a project that took a pragmatic approach and was designed to make involvement in curriculum planning, design and delivery meaningful and worthwhile for service users, students and educators alike. The paper has two principal objectives. In the first instance, it outlines the strategy for involvement that was used to inform curriculum design and delivery at the University of Abertay Dundee. This was grounded in the academic literature. Second, it provides an evaluation of this strategy based on practical experience and identifies some of the difficulties that must be overcome to work in a collaborative manner. In so doing, it examines some of the common concerns of educational staff, service users and students in relation to service user involvement. In conclusion, we provide recommendations for educators seeking to involve mental health service users in a meaningful manner in both the design of training programmes for mental health workers, and in their delivery.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Janice Burn and Greg Robins

Looks at an online strategy project at Legal Aid in Western Australia. Begins with an overview of e‐government and the Western Australian Government context, and then…

Abstract

Looks at an online strategy project at Legal Aid in Western Australia. Begins with an overview of e‐government and the Western Australian Government context, and then discusses the research model and methodology. Gives a background to the case and analyses the change management process against a comprehensive model of business process change. Concludes with some lessons learned and future directions for research in this area.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

1 – 10 of 91