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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Roberto Luna-Arocas, Ignacio Danvila-Del Valle and Francisco J. Lara

The purpose of this study is to better understand the role of pay satisfaction and employee perception of talent management in business loyalty strategies, which implies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to better understand the role of pay satisfaction and employee perception of talent management in business loyalty strategies, which implies considering both economic and non-economic variables in order to achieve organizational success.

Design/methodology/approach

Results from a survey of 198 workers were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM) based on three constructs (confirmatory factor analysis, CFA). The scales used were: employee perception of talent management, pay satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Pay satisfaction acts as a mediating variable in the significant relationship between the perception of talent management and organizational commitment.

Findings

The partial mediating model hypothesised was supported by the SEM model, indicating that loyalty strategies require both good talent management and a good compensation system.

Research limitations/implications

The article promotes the use of mediating variables as an explanation to better understand the strategies of loyalty in the management of talent, framed within the model of the resource-based view (RBV) theory.

Practical implications

The implications are important for practitioners, who normally put every effort into strategies related to economic reinforcement, since the model suggests that they should also strive to correctly apply talent management.

Social implications

The study suggests the need to understand better retributive systems with an application of talent management based on improvement and professional development.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the article stating that the application of good talent management must be complemented with adequate compensation systems in order to achieve efficient retention strategies for talented employees.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Roberto Luna-Arocas

Nowadays, consumer behavior is more sophisticated and complex than before. In this study, I attempt to analyze the relationship between impulse buying (consumerʼs…

Abstract

Nowadays, consumer behavior is more sophisticated and complex than before. In this study, I attempt to analyze the relationship between impulse buying (consumerʼs emotional side of the consumption) and an individualʼs self-discrepancy (the difference between what one is and what one would like to be). I propose that a consumer uses impulse buying to lift oneʼs self up and remove oneʼs self-discrepancy. Results from a sample of consumers in Spain established that a consumer experienced self-discrepancy was likely to have impulse buying. Moreover, the larger the self discrepancy, the more one was dissatisfied with oneʼs consumption. Finally, symbolic meanings of products to the consumer were associated with the different areas of self-discrepancy. Clothing is associated with not only oneʼs image in front of others but also oneʼs self-esteem. Therefore, impulse buying in clothing is positively related to oneʼs self-discrepancy in the emotional side of self.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Roberto Luna‐Arocas and Toto Sutarso

This study examined a mediating model of income and pay satisfaction with a direct path (income → pay satisfaction) and an indirect path with two mediators (income → the…

Abstract

This study examined a mediating model of income and pay satisfaction with a direct path (income → pay satisfaction) and an indirect path with two mediators (income → the love of money → pay equity comparison → pay satisfaction). Results of the whole sample showed that the indirect path was significant and the direct path was insignificant. When the indirect path was eliminated, income contributed positively to pay satisfaction. We then tested the model across two moderators: culture (the United States versus Spain) and gender. This study provides the following theoretical and empirical contributions: the direct relationship between income and pay satisfaction depends on the indirect path and the extent to which (1) income enhances the love of money and (2) the love of money is applied to evaluate pay equity comparison satisfaction. If both conditions exist, income leads to pay dissatisfaction. If the second condition does not exist, income does not lead to pay dissatisfaction. Pay satisfaction depends on (1) one’s love of money and (2) how one compares. The role of the love of money in pay satisfaction is “not”universal across cultures and gender.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, David Shin‐Hsiung Tang and Roberto Luna‐Arocas

To develop money profiles based on money attitudes and investigate differences in work‐related attitudes across money profiles.

Abstract

Purpose

To develop money profiles based on money attitudes and investigate differences in work‐related attitudes across money profiles.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 564 university students in the USA were collected and four money profiles based on the Love of Money Scale (LOMS) were identified using cluster analysis.

Findings

Achieving money worshipers (23.22 percent) have the highest scores on factors good, respect, achievement, and power. Careless money admirers (30.16 percent) have the lowest scores on factors budget and evil. Apathetic money managers (31.08 percent) have the lowest scores on factors respect and achievement and the highest on budget. Money repellent Individuals (15.54 percent) have the lowest scores on factors good and power and the highest on factor evil. Achieving money worshipers have the highest level of organization‐based self‐esteem (OBSE), the protestant work ethic (PWE), intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction, and satisfaction with social and self‐actualization needs, whereas money repellent individuals have the lowest. Apathetic money managers have the highest level of satisfaction with physiological and safety needs.

Research limitations/implications

This convenience sample does not represent the national population in general or student population in particular. Self‐reported data from the same source at one time can inflate relationships between variables and do not provide the cause‐and‐effect relationship.

Practical implications

Researchers and managers understand that people in different money profiles have different work‐related attitudes and importance and satisfaction of human needs and that they may identify human resource strategies to predict and control behavior in organizations.

Originality/value

The four money profiles, replicated in this study, are valid across several cultures.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Roberto Luna‐Arocas and Harold D. Whiteside

This research examines the money ethic scale (budget, evil, equity, success, and motivator), self‐reported income, demographic variables, and life satisfaction among 207…

Abstract

This research examines the money ethic scale (budget, evil, equity, success, and motivator), self‐reported income, demographic variables, and life satisfaction among 207 professors in the USA and 102 professors in Spain. Results suggested that the female/male income ratio was 70.95 percent for American professors and 63.82 percent for Spanish professors. American faculty reported higher scores on factors budget, equity, and success, and lower scores on factor evil than their Spanish counterparts. Sex (male), factors budget, education, and work experience were predictors of American professors’ income, while work experience, sex (male), education, and factor motivator were predictors of Spanish professors’ income. For the American sample, marital status (married), factors budget, sex (male), a low level of education, and a low level of factor success were predictors of life satisfaction, whereas for the Spanish sample, marital status (married), young age, and factor budget were predictors of life satisfaction. Income was not related to life satisfaction in both samples.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Roberto Luna‐Arocas, Toto Sutarso and David Shin‐Hsiung Tang

This research examines the love of money as a moderator and as a mediator of the self‐reported income‐pay satisfaction relationship among university professors…

Abstract

This research examines the love of money as a moderator and as a mediator of the self‐reported income‐pay satisfaction relationship among university professors (lecturers). Hierarchical multiple regression results showed that the interaction effect between self‐reported income and the love of money on pay satisfaction was significant. For high‐love‐of‐money professors (lecturers), the relationship between income and pay satisfaction was positive and significant, however, for low‐love‐of‐money professors (lecturers), the relationship was not significant. High‐love‐of‐money participants had lower pay satisfaction than low‐love‐of‐money participants when the self‐reported income was below $89,139.53. When income was higher than $89,139.53, the pattern of pay satisfaction was reversed. Further, the love of money was a mediator of the self‐reported income‐pay satisfaction relationship. Income increases the love of money that, in turn, is used as a “frame of reference” to evaluate pay satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Kenneth R. Tillery, Blagoja Lazarevski and Roberto Luna‐Arocas

This study examines the love of money and work‐related attitudes and identifies four money profiles based on a sample of citizens in the Republic of Macedonia. Achieving…

Abstract

This study examines the love of money and work‐related attitudes and identifies four money profiles based on a sample of citizens in the Republic of Macedonia. Achieving Money Worshipers (the highest scores on Factors Success, Motivator, and Budget and the lowest on Evil) had the highest active involvement in work activities. Careless Money Admirers (the lowest score on Factor Budget) had the highest external locus of control, the highest involvement, and lowest success avoidance. Apathetic Money Managers (the lowest scores on Factors Success and Motivator) had the highest internal locus of control and the lowest involvement. Money Repellent Individuals (the highest score on Factor Evil) had the lowest competitiveness and the highest success avoidance. Results provide the validity of the Love of Money Scale and the four money profiles.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Roberto Luna‐Arocas and Joaquín Camps

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between human resource practices and staff retention by selecting three high performance work practices (precursors) and one…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between human resource practices and staff retention by selecting three high performance work practices (precursors) and one outcome variable (turnover intentions), and trying to demonstrate the mediator role of employee commitment and job satisfaction in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model has been analyzed with a sample of 198 employees and a structural equation modeling methodology.

Findings

Salary strategies and job enrichment strategies were positively related to job satisfaction. Job enrichment strategies and job stability strategies were positively related to employee commitment. Employee commitment was negatively related to turnover intentions. The relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intentions was mediated by employee commitment

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the findings is the use of self‐report questionnaires to collect data on all measures. Another potential limitation concerns the measurement of some latent factors with only two observable variables.

Practical implications

Turnover continues to be a serious problem for businesses. The proposed model suggests the use of specific practices that develop satisfaction and commitment as an intermediate step to low turnover intentions.

Originality/value

A sample of 198 workers was used as the source of information. This information offers clear advantages over the more widely used samples from managerial directors or statistical data gathered in human resource practices, as in this case. The perceptions of those people on whom these measures are directly carried out are readily accessible.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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