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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Edgar Whitley and Eleanor Wynn

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Roberta Lamb and Steve Sawyer

To extend the work of Rob Kling, whose research interests, and advocacy were at the center of a movement in analytical inquiry and empirical research now known as “social…

Abstract

Purpose

To extend the work of Rob Kling, whose research interests, and advocacy were at the center of a movement in analytical inquiry and empirical research now known as “social informatics”.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the work of those who engage in social informatics research to strengthen and further the conceptual perspective, analytical approaches, and intellectual contributions of social informatics.

Findings

The vibrant and growing international community of active social informatics scholars has assembled a social informatics resource kit that includes: perspective lenses through which research data can be viewed critically; techniques for building theory and developing models from socially rich empirical data; and a common body of knowledge regarding the uses and effects of ICTs.

Originality/value

The paper identifies opportunities to engage new scholars in social informatics discussions, and suggests new venues for promoting and extending the work of scholars already enrolled in the social informatics movement.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Nilmini Wickramasinghe and Roberta Lamb

In their conceptualization of the principal/agent relationship, Jensen and Meckling were not referring to a knowledge worker (KW) agent. Agency theory is extended to the…

Abstract

In their conceptualization of the principal/agent relationship, Jensen and Meckling were not referring to a knowledge worker (KW) agent. Agency theory is extended to the context of a KW agent to identify a key role for IS/IT in facilitating the monitoring function. To test this, the dynamics of a critical principal‐KW agent relationship in the health‐care industry are investigated. It is demonstrated that IS/IT goes beyond just alleviating the agency problem to enabling the KW agent to perform “self‐monitoring”. The results are significant for health care, agency relationships and the use of IS/IT with knowledge workers.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Keith Horton, Elisabeth Davenport and Trevor Wood‐Harper

To provide a view of Rob Kling's contribution to socio‐technical studies of work.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a view of Rob Kling's contribution to socio‐technical studies of work.

Design/methodology/approach

The five “big ideas” discussed are signature themes in Kling's own work in the informatics domain, and of his intellectual legacy.

Findings

This paper conveys something of Kling's presence in social informatics (SI) thinking by focusing on a number of “big” ideas – “multiple points of view”, “social choices”, “the production lattice” (and its corollary, the problematization of the user), “socio‐technical interaction networks”, and “institutional truth regimes”.

Research limitations/implications

A growing research community has demonstrated the power of SI techniques. It is essential that this body of work is sustained and developed, demonstrating how to undertake investigation and observation, that is not driven by instrumentalism but is informed by and leads to “technological realism”.

Practical implications

The SI corpus, exposing the dangers of naïve instrumentalism as an approach to information systems design and management, can guide practitioners on how to unpack the history of what is in view. This may be a specific technology, a social formation, or a sociotechnical circumstance. Practitioners may draw on the concepts presented, not as a prescriptive toolkit, but rather as a sensitizing frame to assist those who wish to re‐vision the workplace.

Originality/value

Central to the successful utilisation of computers in work, we argue, is the continuing development of a portfolio of interpretive concepts (such as STINs, regimes of truth, production lattices) that can consolidate Rob Kling's “big” ideas that are the core of this paper.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Kevin Crowston

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Roberta Capitello, Claudia Bazzani and Diego Begalli

This study aims to focus on consumers’ preferences towards rosé wine and explore whether and how the consumption context may influence consumers’ choices.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on consumers’ preferences towards rosé wine and explore whether and how the consumption context may influence consumers’ choices.

Design/methodology/approach

Using social networks platform, the authors conducted a choice experiment, to evaluate Italian consumers’ preferences for a glass of rosé in two consumption contexts, restaurant and wine bar. Characteristics of the rosé wine also included price, origin and type of wine. The authors applied a latent class analysis to define rosé wine consumers’ segments and incorporated personality traits in the model.

Findings

The results define three rosé wine drinkers’ profiles: “Wine bar visitors”, “The unenthusiastic” and “Restaurant visitors”. Socio-demographic characteristics and personality traits significantly affect consumers’ membership to the different segments. Who prefers to drink a rosé glass at the wine bar is younger, more opened to new experiences and, therefore, more inclined towards more sophisticated choices. Consumers at the restaurants tend to be more extrovert and sensitive to price.

Practical implications

This study offers insight for practitioners of both wine and hospitality industries in the development of strategies for new products market placement and, at the same time, for academics who are interested in the understanding of behavioural reasoning of consumers’ wine purchase choices.

Originality/value

This research investigates the effect of consumption context on individuals’ preference formation for a less familiar wine, such as rosé in Italy. To the authors’ knowledge, no previous studies explored how personality traits may affect consumers’ wine consumption context choices.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Roberta Discetti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between consumer movements and sustainability certification bodies in the development of food-related consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between consumer movements and sustainability certification bodies in the development of food-related consumer campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a longitudinal approach to the study of an empirical case, the Fairtrade Towns (FTT) movement in the UK. It combines netnographic analysis on the FTT’s online forum with interviews with members of the community and of the certification body coordinating the movement.

Findings

The author conceptualises Sustainably Certified Consumer Communities (SCCC) as a distinct sub-group of consumer movements whose identity coalesces around a sustainable certification and that mobilises supporters with the purpose of promoting social change through the marketplace. The longitudinal approach allows the identification of definitional elements, main practices and unresolved tensions of this concept.

Originality/value

Research addressing the social movement dimension of contemporary food-related sustainability certification is limited. The present study advances consumer research through the conceptualisation of SCCC and contributes to a new understanding of the political roles that market-oriented certification bodies can play in consumer activism. From a managerial perspective, it provides valuable insights into practitioners interested in fostering community engagement.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Simone Mueller and Steve Charters

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Roberta Spalter-Roth

This chapter examines everyday food production and consumption by three white working class Jewish sisters in the “outer boroughs” of New York City between the war years…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines everyday food production and consumption by three white working class Jewish sisters in the “outer boroughs” of New York City between the war years of the 1940s and the suburbanization of the 1950s.

Methodology/approach

The analysis combines theory, social history, and political economic context as well as the memories of daily life during this period.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis is not generalizable to the working class population at large during this era.

Findings

The chapter shows the importance of changes in the political economy as well as family structure and intersectionality on the production and consumption of food.

Social implications

The importance of government intervention and regulation in food distribution as a mechanism to combat scarcity and to increase equality is demonstrated.

Originality/value

The chapter examines the concept of intersectionality from the perspective of white, working class Jewish women. It analyzes the relationship between government policies, the growth of monopoly capital and women’s agency, and it fleshes out the concepts of social reproduction and use value.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

Keywords

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