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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Robert W. Rasberry

Today’s businesses consist of diverse employees, many of whom are in a state of cognitive moral confusion. Some have trouble distinguishing right from wrong. Others…

Abstract

Today’s businesses consist of diverse employees, many of whom are in a state of cognitive moral confusion. Some have trouble distinguishing right from wrong. Others question whether such standards even exist. Many businesses need a constant presence that reminds everyone to do the right thing. The name of that ethical conscience is the “ethics office.” Some companies have moved beyond compliance to an integrity‐based approach to ethics management, building a culture that embraces core values and an uncompromising implementation of legal and ethical principles. These guiding principles are embodied in the strategic planning process and evidenced in the daily decision making and actions of the firm. In integrity‐based companies, the ethics office truly serves as the organizational conscience, gently reminding management and employees alike to remember their ethical compass.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Catherine Gorrell

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Julia Furay

– The purpose of this article is to offer a new perspective on library instruction by examining its relationship with various aspects of theatrical performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to offer a new perspective on library instruction by examining its relationship with various aspects of theatrical performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses personal observations as inspiration to examine what has been written in scholarly literature about various theatrical practices in instruction, applying the conversation to the library instruction context. Additionally, research from business and professional literature is also incorporated into the discussion. This literature review focuses on three general areas. First, a review on how to use tools and perspectives from the theater to help librarians prepare their lessons; second, an examination of the librarian as performer; and third, a discussion on how theater might help librarians deal with repetition and burnout.

Findings

The literature on this subject has been extensive and includes an all-encompassing range of practical suggestions, research findings and theoretical analyses.

Research limitations/implications

This article looks at this subject through the lens of scholarly literature. Empirical research on this topic is still needed.

Practical implications

The author presents a number of theatrical practices librarians might consider incorporating into their instruction sessions.

Originality/value

Much has been written about the connection between teaching and theatrical performance, but seldom from a librarian’s point of view. This article is of value to librarians looking to develop a memorable one-shot instruction session and those looking to examine the connection between teaching and performance.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Thomas P. Loughman, Robert A. Fleck and Robin Snipes

As organizations seek to prosper in ever more complex and changing environments, they will require ever more sophisticated analysis and design tools. Current systems…

Abstract

As organizations seek to prosper in ever more complex and changing environments, they will require ever more sophisticated analysis and design tools. Current systems analysis tools function well to identify hardware and software requirements – the mostly technical elements of systems – but are less well suited to address the human component, an understanding of which is crucial to successful organizational analysis and design. The best technically designed system can easily fail when human factors are not explicitly included. The authors show how a combination of systems analysis and communication auditing methods can jointly optimize both the social and technical elements of organizations as they undergo design or business process re‐engineering. As a result of this joint optimization, the authors maintain that systems analysis tools are enriched and thereby enable system designers to explicitly include human and organizational communication factors into an information or business system. A theoretical model and implementation examples are provided.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 100 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1969

TWO Government reports in one week—one at first unobtainable because of a union dispute, the other a vast opus of three volumes, with three separate volumes of maps—this…

Abstract

TWO Government reports in one week—one at first unobtainable because of a union dispute, the other a vast opus of three volumes, with three separate volumes of maps—this was the fate of librarians in Britain during the second week of June 1969. So long to wait for these reports of Dainton and Maud, then so much to read.

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New Library World, vol. 71 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Pre‐employment medical examinations with appropriate testing are required in many industries—a basic tenet of Occupational Medicine—and it has long been a recommendation…

Abstract

Pre‐employment medical examinations with appropriate testing are required in many industries—a basic tenet of Occupational Medicine—and it has long been a recommendation of many in community medicine and environmental health for those food handlers whose close contact with open food, aspects of its preparation, processing, sale, exposure for sale, make their personal health important and in prevention of diseases and may constitute a health hazard to food consumers. Epidemiological studies have revealed too many instances of a human source of disease, especially in milk and water, for this to be denied or under‐estimated. Food poisioning outbreaks caused by a carrier, of chronic or limited duration, enable those investigating such outbreaks to see there could be advantages in medical screening of certain employees especially in certain areas of food trades. The main problem is to decide the extent of the discipline and who should be subject to it. The fact that by far the majority of the examinations and tests will prove negative should not be seen as removing the need for the service. After all, there are a number of similar circumstances in public health. Meat inspection, for example, in which a 100% inspection of all food animals slaughtered for human food is now fully established, it is not suggested that inspections should in any way be reduced despite the fact that a number of the diseases, eg., tuberculosis, no longer occurs as it once did, which was the prime cause of meat inspection being brought into being. Other areas where routine medical examinations reveal satisfactory health with only a few isolated cases requiring attention, is the school medical service. Here, the “de‐bunkers” have had some success, but if children are not regularly examined at vulnerable age levels and especially in between where the occasion demands, there is no question that much will be missed and ill‐health progress to a chronic state.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Richard Kalwa and Arthur G. Bedeian

Elizabeth Walker is one of today's career women who has received increasing media attention over the last decade.

Abstract

Elizabeth Walker is one of today's career women who has received increasing media attention over the last decade.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 2 November 2009

Jeffrey R. Dudas

Scholars increasingly recognize the centrality of legal ideas and language to the political vision that inspires American conservatism. However, relevant studies have been…

Abstract

Scholars increasingly recognize the centrality of legal ideas and language to the political vision that inspires American conservatism. However, relevant studies have been limited to the discursive practices that motivate conservative activism at the grass-root level. Exploration of the legal discourses employed by prominent public officials thus carries significant scholarly potential. For example, this chapter's investigation of President Ronald Reagan reveals that his political vision was suffused with legal discourse. Reagan's legal discourse, moreover, has exerted constitutive effects both on American conservatism and on the form and substance of a great deal of contemporary American public policy.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-616-8

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