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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

62

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Luke McElcheran and Mario Santana Quintero

Toronto's heritage program is reporting year over year growth in both the number of listed and designated properties and the amount of money secured for heritage projects…

Abstract

Purpose

Toronto's heritage program is reporting year over year growth in both the number of listed and designated properties and the amount of money secured for heritage projects. At the same time, it is widely recognized that heritage trade skills are in decline. The purpose of this research is to examine Toronto's heritage policy in its regulatory and economic context to understand why heritage trades are struggling while the heritage program and the market for heritage professional services flourish and to suggest solutions based on existing policy tools.

Design/methodology/approach

This research looks at the policy documents at the federal, provincial and municipal level that determine the minimum standard for heritage conservation in Toronto. It refers to secondary research on the economic context for these regulations to understand how they are applied and why they tend to produce certain outcomes. It introduces the regulatory context set by Canada's Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places and the Ontario Heritage Act. It goes on to analyse Toronto's local policy in more detail including density bonusing programs, the Toronto Official Plan and Heritage Conservation District planning standards.

Findings

Toronto's heritage policy creates asymmetrical opportunities for heritage professionals and heritage specializing tradespeople. While the work that heritage professionals do is required or strongly encouraged by policy and increases reliably with the amount of funding secured for heritage projects, heritage tradespeople do not enjoy similar advantages. Their work is not required in the same way as heritage professionals' or encouraged to the same degree, and money secured for heritage projects does not necessarily go towards work that would engage the building trades necessary to maintain heritage structures.

Originality/value

The value of job creation in heritage trades is a mainstay of heritage economic advocacy, and there is growing interest in the value of these trades skills as a resource for sustainable building practices. There is relatively little research considering how heritage policy and theory affect career opportunities for workers with these trades skills, and none that addresses those systemic pressures in the context of municipal heritage programs in Canada.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Guillermo S. Reher

There are currently various methodologies used for carrying out impact assessments of cultural heritage. This paper aims to critically explore the reasons for this…

Abstract

Purpose

There are currently various methodologies used for carrying out impact assessments of cultural heritage. This paper aims to critically explore the reasons for this diversity and ascertain their varying consistency.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper does a comparative analysis of the methodologies used, exploring how they measure up to the theoretical underpinnings of the ecosystem services approach and the cultural values model, considered to be the most comprehensive strategies for assessing the impact of cultural heritage.

Findings

The study reveals that there are few methodologies, and they only inconsistently work upon the theoretical perspectives mentioned earlier. In addition, from the public policy perspective, surprisingly few areas endowed with cultural heritage have been, in one way or another, assessed for impact, perhaps in part due to the lack of adequate methodologies.

Research limitations/implications

The methods analysed are those that have been made public, which can be found in English. Also, they may be exploratory themselves, so some of the conclusions reached here may have also been found by the analysts themselves. This research serves to provide some scientific groundings for developing a more comprehensive impact assessment method.

Practical implications

The results of this paper highlight certain glaring absences from current methodologies which invite the development of more definitive cultural impact assessment models. This is possible given the current state of the art, and further research and practice are necessary to develop a more comprehensive cultural values model–based research assessment.

Social implications

By focussing on the absence of certain indicators on behalf of impact assessment methodologies, this paper sheds light on the overlooked (or under-measured) benefits derived from cultural heritage. Many of the benefits derived from this type of resource find an opportunity to come out in the open, greatly affecting researchers, cultural heritage planners and local communities.

Originality/value

This paper also serves to substantiate a glaring absence within the ecosystem services framework, which is the lack of practical methodologies for measuring some of these service values.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Robert Shipley and Jason F. Kovacs

The collapse of some prominent corporations over the last ten years has been attributed to poor governance. Not‐for‐profit agencies are now examining their own governance

4067

Abstract

Purpose

The collapse of some prominent corporations over the last ten years has been attributed to poor governance. Not‐for‐profit agencies are now examining their own governance policies and practices in an attempt to prevent the calamities that have plagued the private sector. Because heritage sites, conservation organizations and heritage‐based tourism are significant factors in the social life and economies of many countries, the proper management of cultural heritage initiatives is vital. This paper seeks to undertake the development of a set of good governance principles applicable to the oversight and operation of cultural heritage institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The fifth World Parks Congress, in South Africa in 2003, encouraged the development of governance principles for protected areas based on the UNDP document Governance for Sustainable Human Development. Using these standards as a reference for the cultural heritage setting, UNESCO and ICOMOS charters and conventions, along with documents from National Trusts in specific countries are examined with regard to their relevance to good governance.

Findings

A set of good governance criteria and principles including legitimacy and voice, direction, performance, accountability, and fairness, is developed.

Practical implications

The paper addresses governance issues and principles relevant to non‐governmental and public sector governance in the cultural heritage sector.

Originality/value

The paper draws on principles of good governance from several international heritage related agencies, trusts and organizations to develop a set of principles that can be recommended for use in the cultural heritage sector.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Content available
52

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Windham B. Hornby and Miles Macleod

Aims to: determine the degree of association between the setting of pricing objectives and the firm’s financial performance in the Scottish computer industry; to determine…

1198

Abstract

Aims to: determine the degree of association between the setting of pricing objectives and the firm’s financial performance in the Scottish computer industry; to determine the extent of the relationship between prime pricing objectives and the nature of competition; to analyse the relationship between pricing objectives and firm size; and to determine the degree of association between setting pricing objectives and stages of market evolution. Finds that most firms within the Scottish computer industry had some control over pricing decisions. Furthermore, there was no strong evidence to suggest that the setting of pricing objectives varied systematically with financial performance, levels of competition, firm size or stages of market evolution. Finds, however, that the most profitable firms placed more importance on market share, whereas less profitable firms regarded cash‐flow objectives as more important.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Richard A. Gray

While granting Cowper the full poetic license he is entitled to, prosaically I must observe that it is not the syllables but rather the philogists who pant. They do indeed…

Abstract

While granting Cowper the full poetic license he is entitled to, prosaically I must observe that it is not the syllables but rather the philogists who pant. They do indeed breathe rapidly in short gasps after they have established each successively deeper level of root connection in pursuit of the etymological purpose of delineating the origin and historical development of words, or of providing an account of any given word. Etymology as so defined I will designate analytic etymology and distinguish from another form of word study, which I shall call reconstructive etymology.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1911

[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's…

Abstract

[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's railway journey from Perth and has a magnificent cathedral, founded in the twelfth century, which is well worthy of a visit.]

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Windham B. Hornby

Examines the gap between the microeconomic theory of the firm andbusiness reality. In particular, it seeks to redress the balance betweentheory and practice by examining…

1534

Abstract

Examines the gap between the microeconomic theory of the firm and business reality. In particular, it seeks to redress the balance between theory and practice by examining the objectives of top Scottish companies. The survey confirms initial expectations that Scottish companies are more owner‐controlled than their UK counterparts. In addition, it also appears that Scottish companies are more likely to pursue profit maximization as a goal than companies elsewhere in the UK. It was found that the majority of Scottish companies were financially conservative and risk‐averse but in the absence of comparable data for UK no conclusions can be drawn from this. Nevertheless, in common with other studies, it is confirmed that Scottish companies are similar to their UK counterparts in so far as they tend to be satisficers and pursue multiple objectives. There appears to be no evidence to support links between size and ownership type and profit maximization. Contrary to expectations, owner‐controlled companies are more likely to operate with a minimum profit constraint than managerially controlled companies. Finally, it is confirmed that the majority of firms are “full‐cost pricers” although hypotheses linking this type of pricing policy with size and market structure, while suggestive of such links, were not statistically significant.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Robert Linsdell has become UK Sales Director of Morton Electronic Materials, having been responsible for the management of the company's sales and marketing activities…

Abstract

Robert Linsdell has become UK Sales Director of Morton Electronic Materials, having been responsible for the management of the company's sales and marketing activities since 1990. Mr Linsdell joined the company, then known as Dynachem, in 1981 as Technical Sales Representative and later became Technical Service Manager, responsible for delivering technical support in the UK as well as in other European areas serviced by the UK facility.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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