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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Robert M.J. Czernkowski

Discusses the development of expert systems (ES) as an improvementon computer‐aided valuation techniques (CAV), due to its allowing themodelling of complex non‐linear and…

Abstract

Discusses the development of expert systems (ES) as an improvement on computer‐aided valuation techniques (CAV), due to its allowing the modelling of complex non‐linear and qualitative relationships and processes, such as those which exist within the field of valuation. Explores valuation as a set of processes and details current technology with reference to the impact of CAVs in Australia. Discusses expert systems as the latest stage in the evolution of computer methods which support humans in decision making, outlines ES procedure and gives examples of current applications. Considers the application of expert systems to rating valuation and reviews the theory of ′information chunking.

Details

Journal of Valuation, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Robert Czernkowski, Rosin a Mladenovic, Carolyn Cousins, Roger Gibson and Gordon Howitt

In this paper, we measure the impact of transactional leadership and transformational leadership styles on student learning outcomes. Leadership style was measured using a…

Abstract

In this paper, we measure the impact of transactional leadership and transformational leadership styles on student learning outcomes. Leadership style was measured using a set of questions that were developed based on the conceptions of leadership style from Avolio, Waldman and Yammarino (1991). Student learning outcomes investigated included overall final mark achieved in the course, as well as communication skills, writing skills, critical thinking and analysis skills, study skills, reading skills and interpersonal skills.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2019

Robert Czernkowski, Stephen Kean and Stephen Lim

This paper aims to examine the impact of the Australian Securities Exchange Corporate Governance recommendations on the breadth (amount of items covered) of (environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the Australian Securities Exchange Corporate Governance recommendations on the breadth (amount of items covered) of (environmental and social) sustainability reporting by the firms in the Top 100, around the change from G3.1 to G4 disclosure regimes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper undertakes comparisons of means and regression models to investigate the changes between disclosure scores of 98 listed entities from the 2013 G3.1 to the 2015 G4 disclosure regimes.

Findings

This paper finds that average disclosure levels did not change. Nonetheless, disclosure practices did vary by entity size and performance. Analysis of 2015 disclosures contingent on 2013 disclosure practice indicates that disclosure changes are consistent with a pattern of mean reversion.

Practical implications

Evidence that low disclosers increased disclosure and high disclosers reduced disclosers is consistent with the idea that sustainability disclosure is not so much driven by any ethical considerations, but rather by a desire to not be a disclosure outlier. Reliance on voluntary disclosure to achieve a socially desired level of disclosure is unlikely to bear fruit.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on sustainability by examining firm responses to change in disclosure regimes, and concluding that size and peer relativities drive the disclosure process.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Robert Czernkowski, Wendy Green and Yi Wang

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether audit opinions matter in China after the introduction of several key regulatory changes, specifically aimed at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether audit opinions matter in China after the introduction of several key regulatory changes, specifically aimed at strengthening the confidence of investors in the audit function.

Design/methodology/approach

The question is addressed by examining the market response to modified audit opinions of companies listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange.

Findings

In contrast to earlier research, this paper does not find evidence that modified audit opinions have significant information value to Chinese investors, despite the regulatory changes. However, when partitioning the sample by year, there is weak evidence of a stock price response to modified audit opinions in 2003. Examination of the impact of different types of audit opinions shows no consistent results.

Research limitations/implications

The results reported in this paper must be considered in light of the limitations inherent in empirical analyses. That is, the relationships identified in this paper are indicative of potential earnings management or audit opinion shopping, however, the paper cannot provide the actual reasons for these empirical results.

Practical implications

The results suggest the Chinese market is beginning to value audit opinions in the same fashion way as more developed markets.

Originality/value

The paper refines market reaction models used in earlier studies through the introduction of additional explanatory variables, together with an improved methodology.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Mark Russell

This paper aims to examine whether firms with high information asymmetry disclose more information under a continuous disclosure regime, and, second, the paper examines…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether firms with high information asymmetry disclose more information under a continuous disclosure regime, and, second, the paper examines whether continuous disclosures reduce information asymmetry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study models relations between continuous disclosures and information asymmetry using ordinary least squares regression and two-stage least squares regression.

Findings

The study finds firms with high information asymmetry disclose more information. Further, the study finds that disclosure in the presence of high information asymmetry increases asymmetry. Finally, while bad news increases information asymmetry, the disclosure of firm-specific good and bad news is associated with reduced information asymmetry.

Originality/value

The paper identifies conditions under which Continuous Disclosure Regime increases information in markets and influences information asymmetry.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

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