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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Patricia Peterson, Bill Morrison, Robert Laurie, Viviane Yvette Bolaños Gramajo and John Brock Morrison

This paper explores the use of the mental fitness and resiliency inventory (MFRI) as a tool for the management of workplace health and well-being. The MFRI provides…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the use of the mental fitness and resiliency inventory (MFRI) as a tool for the management of workplace health and well-being. The MFRI provides information on the extent to which positive workplace practices are experienced within three mental fitness domains and five resiliency domains. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factorial structure and internal consistency of the MFRI.

Design/methodology/approach

The MFRI was administered to 1,519 employees in multiple workplace environments in Canada. The factorial structure of the MFRI was examined to conduct confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). In addition to the CFA indexes, the internal consistency of each latent construct was calculated, with results reported using Cronbach's coefficient alpha.

Findings

The reliability of the MFRI is very high (alpha = 0.973). The fit indexes from the CFA indicate that the model is permissible. The MFRI can be used with confidence to highlight mental fitness and resiliency strengths, as well as areas needing further development in workplace environments.

Research limitation/implications

Limitations may include the selection of fit indexes upon which to base judgment as to whether the model is satisfactory. Although the MFRI model has been confirmed based on the data from the study sample, there is not yet sufficient data to conclude that the model is a true predictive model. Current and ongoing research will enable elaboration on this matter. In addition, formal documented observations regarding the MFRI's face validity and ease of explanation and understanding of the results may confirm a priori expectations on the part of the users and may strengthen the conclusions from this study.

Practical implications

Implications for workplaces arising from the validation of the MFRI include a growth in capacity to measure the existence of positive psychology practices within organizational environments and to identify and address areas for needed growth and development. By assessing the prevalence of mental fitness and resiliency practices in workplace environments, reports can be produced that indicate various levels of development and integration of these practices. The application of the MFRI facilitates the use of evidence-informed decision-making in addressing organizational goals related to positive workplace cultures.

Originality/value

The MFRI is a new, validated instrument that measures the presence of positive practices that contribute to healthy and effective workplace cultures. The results of the MFRI provide workplace health managers with a profile of organizational strengths (practices that are embedded and comprehensive) and areas for development (practices requiring promotion and capacity building) related to mental fitness and resiliency.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

James R. Brown, Robert F. Lusch and Laurie P. Smith

A conceptual model was developed of distribution channel members′manifest conflicts and their satisfaction. From this model, hypothesesare generated, aimed at untangling…

Abstract

A conceptual model was developed of distribution channel members′ manifest conflicts and their satisfaction. From this model, hypotheses are generated, aimed at untangling the causal relationship between these two constructs. Both a meta‐analysis of previous research and this first longitudinal study of distribution channel behaviour in the aircraft industry in North America of distribution channel behaviour uncovered a negative, contemporaneous relationship between satisfaction and conflict. Empirical study in the channel for an industrial product found the effect of channel member satisfaction over time to be mediated by the extent of manifest conflict. The impact of manifest conflict was found to be mediated by the degree of channel member satisfaction. In other words, channel member satisfaction and manifest conflict within the channel were both antecedents and consequences of each other.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Meiko Lin, Erin Bumgarner and Madhabi Chatterji

This policy brief, the third in the AERI-NEPC eBrief series “Understanding validity issues around the world”, discusses validity issues surrounding International Large…

Abstract

Purpose

This policy brief, the third in the AERI-NEPC eBrief series “Understanding validity issues around the world”, discusses validity issues surrounding International Large Scale Assessment (ILSA) programs. ILSA programs, such as the well-known Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), are rapidly expanding around the world today. In this eBrief, the authors examine what “validity” means when applied to published results and reports of programs like the PISA.

Design/methodology/approach

This policy brief is based on a synthesis of conference proceedings and review of selected pieces of extant literature. It begins by summarizing perspectives of an invited expert panel on the topic. To that synthesis, the authors add their own analysis of key issues. They conclude by offering recommendations for test developers and test users.

Findings

ILSA programs and tests, while offering valuable information, should be read and used cautiously and in context. All parties need to be on the same page to maximize valid use of ILSA results, to obtain the greatest educational and social benefits, and to minimize negative consequences. The authors propose several recommendations for test makers and ILSA program leaders, and ILSA users. To ILSA leaders and researchers: provide more cautionary information about how to correctly interpret the ILSA results, particularly country rankings, given contextual differences among nations. Provide continuing psychometric or research resources so as to address or reduce various sources of error in reports. Encourage policy makers in different nations to share the responsibility for ensuring more contextualized (and valid) interpretations of ILSA reports and subsequent policy development. Raise awareness among policy makers to look beyond simple rankings and pay more attention to inter-country differences. For consumers of ILSA results and reports: read the fine print, not just the country rankings, to interpret ILSA results correctly in particular regions/nations. When looking to high-ranking countries as role models, be sure to consider the “whole picture”. Use ILSA data as complements to other national- and state-level educational assessments to better gauge the status of the country's education system and subsequent policy directions.

Originality/value

By translating complex information on validity issues with all concerned ILSA stakeholders in mind, this policy brief will improve uses and applications of ILSA information in national and regional policy contexts.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Sarah B. Proctor‐Thomson

To explore the experience of a key member of the UK equalities policy‐making elite, interrogating her shift from activist to top‐ranking equalities professional. To focus…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the experience of a key member of the UK equalities policy‐making elite, interrogating her shift from activist to top‐ranking equalities professional. To focus attention on the under‐explored area of lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender equalities work.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview is prefaced with a critical commentary on current UK equalities policy, contextualising the interview discussion, which links personal and collective histories and provides a comparison of equalities work over time.

Findings

Angela Mason, while top‐ranking civil servant, continues to claim the label activist. Like a variety of other equalities workers she uses multiple tactics to appeal to different constituents at different times and in different contexts.

Originality/value

This is an interview with one of the key protagonists in the development of UK equalities policies over the last 30 years. It is unique in its focus on the current overhaul of UK equalities policy from an “insider” and in its timing at the interim point of this reorganisation (October 2006).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Anders Örtenblad

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Robert F. Bruner, Laurie Simon Hodrick and Sean Carr

At three o'clock in the morning on September 10, 2001, Thierry Hautillac, a risk arbitrageur, learns of the final agreement between Pinault-Printemps-Redoute SA (“PPR”…

Abstract

At three o'clock in the morning on September 10, 2001, Thierry Hautillac, a risk arbitrageur, learns of the final agreement between Pinault-Printemps-Redoute SA (“PPR”) and LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SA (“LVMH”). After a contest for control of Gucci lasting over two years, PPR has emerged as the winner. PPR and LVMH have agreed for PPR to buy about half of LVMH's stock in Gucci for $94 per share, for Gucci to pay an extraordinary dividend of $7 per share, and for PPR to give a two and a half year put option with a strike price of $101.50 to the public shareholders in Gucci. The primary task for the student in this case is to recommend a course of action for Hautillac: should he sell his 2% holding of Gucci shares when the market opens, continue to hold his shares, or buy more shares? The student must estimate the risky arbitrage returns from each of these choices. As a basis for this decision, the student must value the terms of payment and consider what the Gucci stock price will do upon the market's open. The student must determine the intrinsic value of Gucci using a DCF model as well as information on peer firms and transactions. The student must consider potential synergies between Gucci and PPR and between Gucci and LVMH. The student must assess the likelihood of a higher bid, using analysis of price changes at earlier events in the contest for clues.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Laurie Larwood, Sergei Rodkin and Dean Judson

The need to maintain up-to-date technological skills despite an aging workforce makes it imperative that organizations increasingly focus on retraining older employees…

Abstract

The need to maintain up-to-date technological skills despite an aging workforce makes it imperative that organizations increasingly focus on retraining older employees. This article develops an adult career model based on the acquisition of technological skills and gradual skill obsolescence. The model suggests the importance of retraining and provides practical implications to the development of retraining programs. Suggestions for future research are also offered.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Mohammed Kishk, Robert Pollock, Jummai Atta and Laurie Power

Property performance assessment has become increasingly important in property management because of the emergence of a number of trends as issues of concern of property…

Abstract

Property performance assessment has become increasingly important in property management because of the emergence of a number of trends as issues of concern of property owners and occupiers. There are, however, many problems facing the consideration of performance measurement. Perhaps the main obstacle is the lack of a structured process for property performance measurement. The prime objective of the research work that underpins this paper therefore is to address this gap by the development of a structured model for property performance measurement. This involved three main steps. First, basic characteristics of an effective performance assessment in property managements are identified and the framework for a generic model is outlined. Next, key processes of performance measurement and property management tasks are identified. Then, these processes are set out into steps for better understanding and applicability of the model to actual property management practices. Some unique features of the model include consideration of clients and tenants requirements, integration of the functions of property management in the model and the inclusion of two property and resource databases to aid storage and retrieval of information. Besides, it is the first step in developing a dedicated computer tool for property performance assessment.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Bruce Robert Elder and Laurie Swinney

The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which a character component is required for occupational licensing by state, industry and occupation. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which a character component is required for occupational licensing by state, industry and occupation. This study also investigates whether the good moral character (GMC) is defined and how GMC is defined in state statutes. Investigating the GMC requirement is important to society at large because character is a vital factor for trust and trust is an essential component to voluntary exchange and free markets. Investigating the GMC requirement is also important to the thousands of rehabilitated individuals who may be denied work in licensed occupations because of past transgressions.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research data were collected from state licensing statutes. The number of licensed occupations within each of the 50 states that require GMC was tabulated, as well as the number of states that require GMC for licensing by industry group. In addition, an occupation that requires GMC in a high number of states was compared to an occupation that requires GMC in a low number of states within 11 industry groups. Finally, regulatory statutes were searched to determine how good moral character is defined by each of the state licensing boards for the select occupations.

Findings

This paper reports that the inclusion of a character component within regulatory licensing statutes varies widely by occupation and by state. The number of occupations requiring GMC ranged from 8 to 119 per state. The number of states requiring GMC ranged from 12 to 49 per industry group. Occupations within industry groups that are more frequently licensed are also more likely to require GMC than occupations that are less frequently licensed. Occupations that are more frequently licensed, however, are generally not more likely to define GMC in their regulatory statutes. Only accounting, an occupation that requires GMC in most states, also defines GMC in more states than any of the other select occupations.

Research limitations/implications

Only state regulatory statutes were searched for definitions of GMC. Definitions could be included in other government documents such as rules or regulations. As these additional sources were not searched, the number of states that define GMC for the select occupations cited in this study may be understated.

Originality/value

Prior research has included only studies of the GMC requirement relating to the licensing of attorneys and accountants. The current research explores the extent that good moral character is required for licensing across states, industries and select occupations. This research agrees with prior research that GMC, although providing an important foundation for public trust, is typically not well-defined. To counter criticism of the requirement, this paper concludes with a call for the inclusion of a GMC definition within occupational licensing statutes that is “narrowly and precisely construed, avoiding problems of both vagueness and over breadth” (AICPA and NASBA, 2018).

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Michael A. Walton, Richard M. Clerkin, Robert K. Christensen, Laurie E. Paarlberg, Rebecca Nesbit and Mary Tschirhart

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the conditions associated with serving on boards by investigating the factors that distinguish older volunteers who serve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the conditions associated with serving on boards by investigating the factors that distinguish older volunteers who serve on nonprofit boards from those who only volunteer programmatically.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys of 354 residents of Southeastern North Carolina over age 50. Measures include education, wealth, retirement status, public service motivation (PSM), patterns of residential mobility, secular and religious organization meeting attendance, and volunteer activity in the past year. Data were analyzed using a Heckman probit selection model.

Findings

Respondents who have higher levels of education, are retired, or have lived in the community for longer periods are more likely to report board volunteering, but are not any more likely to volunteer programmatically. Those with higher levels of PSM are more likely to report general volunteering, but are not any more likely to volunteer on boards. Two measures reveal divergent findings based on type of volunteering: moving frequently in one’s lifetime and attending weekly religious services are associated with a greater likelihood of programmatic volunteering but a reduced likelihood of serving as a board member.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include self-reported, cross-sectional data, and a geographically restricted American sample that is older, more educated, and more likely to own a second home than average.

Practical implications

In order to better address board member recruitment, nonprofits should consider extending opportunities through strategies targeting retired community newcomers.

Originality/value

This study contributes an analysis of PSM among nonprofit board members, and identifies factors that distinguish programmatic and board volunteers, in order to better understand the conditions associated with board service.

1 – 10 of 340