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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Lusine Poghosyan, Robert J. Lucero, Ashley R. Knutson, Mark W. Friedberg and Hermine Poghosyan

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize existing evidence regarding health care team networks, including their formation and association with outcomes in various health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize existing evidence regarding health care team networks, including their formation and association with outcomes in various health care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Network theory informed this review. A literature search was conducted in major databases for studies that used social network analysis methods to study health care teams in the USA between 2000 and 2014. Retrieved studies were reviewed against inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Findings

Overall, 25 studies were included in this review. Results demonstrated that health care team members form professional (e.g. consultation) and personal (e.g. friendship) networks. Network formation can be influenced by team member characteristics (i.e. demographics and professional affiliations) as well as by contextual factors (i.e. providers sharing patient populations and physical proximity to colleagues). These networks can affect team member practice such as adoption of a new medication. Network structures can also impact patient and organizational outcomes, including occurrence of adverse events and deficiencies in health care delivery.

Practical implications

Administrators and policy makers can use knowledge of health care networks to leverage relational structures in teams and tailor interventions that facilitate information exchange, promote collaboration, increase diffusion of evidence-based practices, and potentially improve individual and team performance as well as patient care and outcomes.

Originality/value

Most health services research studies have investigated health care team composition and functioning using traditional social science methodologies, which fail to capture relational structures within teams. Thus, this review is original in terms of focusing on dynamic relationships among team members.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Robert E. Allen and Margaret A. Lucero

This study empirically examined the antecedents of verbal and physical assaults on managers perpetrated by subordinate employees. A model was presented and hypotheses…

Abstract

This study empirically examined the antecedents of verbal and physical assaults on managers perpetrated by subordinate employees. A model was presented and hypotheses developed that were tested with data obtained through the content analysis of published arbitration decisions. The findings indicated that such assaults were more likely to be verbal than physical, preceded by aversive treatment, and targeted at managers directly involved in the negative outcomes. Additionally, the severity of the incident varied across the different types of triggering events. Individuals who had been aggressive in the past but had not been disciplined were more likely to subsequently engage in physical than verbal assaults. The implications of these findings for future research and organizational practices were also discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Marela Lucero, Alywin Tan Teng Kwang and Augustine Pang

One explicit leadership role the chief executive officer (CEO) can play during crisis is to assume the role of being the organization's spokesperson. What remains unclear…

Abstract

Purpose

One explicit leadership role the chief executive officer (CEO) can play during crisis is to assume the role of being the organization's spokesperson. What remains unclear is at what point of the crisis should the CEO step up and how does that impact crisis communication? The purpose of this paper is to examine this question.

Design/methodology/approach

The meta‐analysis method is used to combine different data in various studies of one topic into one comprehensive study. More than 30 crises are meta‐analyzed.

Findings

The CEO needs to step up to revise earlier statements or when the integrity of the organization is questioned. Additionally, the CEO should step up at the beginning of the crisis if the crisis pertains to organizational transgression or when the crisis becomes unbearable to organizational reputation. As counter‐intuitive as it may, CEOs should refrain from stepping up at the height of the crisis.

Research limitations/implications

It is an exploratory study. Some cases have lesser information to analyze than others.

Practical implications

Instructive for both corporate communications practitioners and CEOs as they have a framework to guide them on when the CEOs should step up, and when the presence of corporate communications would suffice.

Originality/value

Little has been studied to clarify the exact nature, role, and impact of the CEO as organization spokesperson in crises. This paper provides the initial template.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Grant Aguirre, David M. Boje, Melissa L. Cast, Suzanne L. Conner, Catherine Helmuth, Rakesh Mittal, Rohny Saylors, Nazanin Tourani, Sebastien Vendette and Tony Qiang Yan

This intervention study outlines the continuing journey of a university towards its sustainability potentiality. We introduce the importance of sustainable development and…

Abstract

This intervention study outlines the continuing journey of a university towards its sustainability potentiality. We introduce the importance of sustainable development and link it to our intervention study of potentiality for sustainability from a Heideggerian phenomenological perspective. Through a case study of sustainability at New Mexico State University, we provide an insight into the development of a new dimension of university sustainability interface. This interface exists in terms of a dialogic of sustainability, as it relates to the balancing of competing needs, such as efficiency, heart, and brand identity. An important aspect of this interface is intervention, highlighting new possibilities for the top administrators regarding the university's goals and environmentalities. A qualitative and interpretive approach using ontological storytelling inquiry is employed. Data for the study were collected through in-depth interviews with university members from all hierarchical levels. This article raises interesting ontological issues for sustainability researchers, and has implications for strategy as practice.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Robert M. Sloyan and James D. Ludema

The purpose of this research was to understand the sensemaking processes people use to determine their responses to organizational change initiatives as they unfold…

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to understand the sensemaking processes people use to determine their responses to organizational change initiatives as they unfold overtime. Based on a longitudinal comparative case study of five business units in a $900-million manufacturing organization in the United States, it shows that people continuously assess how the initiatives will enhance or diminish their individual and organizational identities using four kinds of trust: trust in the organization, trust in leadership, trust in the process, and trust in outcomes. The complex dynamics among these “four trusts” and their influence on responses to change are described. A four trusts model is proposed to help change leaders formulate specific trust-building strategies to increase the probability of success of organizational change initiatives. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-191-7

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Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2015

Olivia Barnett-Naghshineh

This paper describes the different ways in which people in the highlands of Papua New Guinea are talking about climate change. It demonstrates that people locate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the different ways in which people in the highlands of Papua New Guinea are talking about climate change. It demonstrates that people locate themselves in this process of change in terms of food production and exchange, and that some of the changes being witnessed are also related to the impacts of a growing cash economy on social relations.

Methodology/approach

This ethnography involved 12 months fieldwork including participant observation and interviews.

Research limitations/implications

This is a qualitative study that recognises the perspective of local people for understanding culturally mediated experiences of climate change. However, data regarding rainfall and temperatures over time would be a useful addition for thinking about the extent to which the climate has in fact changed in recent years.

Practical implications

The implications of this paper are that the predictions made in 1990 about increases in production as a result of climate change are apparently coming true, with benefits for some food and coffee producers. But that there are complex social processes occurring at the same time as climate change that mean people’s ability to adapt is dependent on other social conditions. Maintaining ecologically sustainable methods of production and local cultural practices may enable more resilience to the impacts of climate change.

Originality/value

The experiences of people living in the Eastern Highlands and the ways in which people use the discourse of climate change are yet to be acknowledged in policy circles or socio-cultural anthropology literature. This paper presents a partial account of how people in Papua New Guinea are experiencing and talking about change.

Details

Climate Change, Culture, and Economics: Anthropological Investigations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-361-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1988

Library Workstation and PC Report, founded in 1984 as M300 and PC Report, was the brainchild of Allan Pratt, then at the University of Arizona. Pratt, the founding editor…

Abstract

Library Workstation and PC Report, founded in 1984 as M300 and PC Report, was the brainchild of Allan Pratt, then at the University of Arizona. Pratt, the founding editor of Small Computers in Libraries, had a hunch that OCLC's introduction of the M300 workstation was going to call for much hand‐holding and specialist advice and information for librarians. He was right. M300 and PC Report had a subscribership well before the first issue was mailed to readers. And it remains a growing publication to this day.

Details

Library Workstation and PC Report, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0894-9158

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Sean Robert Valentine, David Hollingworth and Patrick Schultz

Focusing on ethical issues when making organizational decisions should encourage a variety of positive outcomes for companies and their employees. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on ethical issues when making organizational decisions should encourage a variety of positive outcomes for companies and their employees. The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree to which data-based ethical decision making, lateral relations and organizational commitment are interrelated in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from business professionals employed at multiple locations of a financial services firm operating in the USA. Mediation analysis (based on structural equation modeling) was used to test the proposed relationships.

Findings

Results indicated that employees’ perceptions of data-based ethical decision making were positively related to perceived lateral relations, and that perceived lateral relations were positively related to organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Given that information was collected using only a self-report questionnaire, common method bias could be an issue. In addition, the study’s cross-sectional design limits conclusions about causality. Another limitation involves the study’s homogenous sample, which decreases the generalizability of the findings. Finally, variable responses could have been impacted by individual frames of reference and other perceptual differences.

Practical implications

Results suggest that information flow enhancements should support or be consistent with horizontal information flow enhancements, and that together these factors should increase employee commitment.

Originality/value

Given the dearth of existing research, this interdisciplinary investigation is important because it fills gaps in the management literature. This study is also important because the results could inform decisions regarding the use of data analysis in ethical decisions and lateral forms of organizational structuring to improve work attitudes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2012

Betty G. Brown, Julie A. Baldwin and Margaret L. Walsh

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive overview of the substance use disparities among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, the…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive overview of the substance use disparities among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, the contributing factors to these disparities, proven and promising approaches through strengths-based methods, barriers to implementation of prevention and treatment efforts, and future recommendations for effective programs and research.

Approach – We have conducted a thorough literature review of relevant research studies, as well as a review of government, tribal, and community-based curricula and resources. This review of programs is not exhaustive but provides several examples of best practices in the field and suggestions for future directions.

Social implications – We strongly advocate that to accurately explore the true etiology of substance abuse and to respond to the concerns that AI/AN have prioritized, it is necessary to utilize a strengths-based approach and draw upon traditional AI/AN perspectives and values, and active community participation in the process. More specifically, prevention and treatment programs should use methods that incorporate elders or intergenerational approaches; foster individual and family skills-building; promote traditional healing methods to recognize and treat historical, cultural, and intergenerational and personal trauma; focus on early intervention; and tailor efforts to each Native nation or community.

Value – Ultimately, to reduce substance abuse disparities in AI/AN youth, we must find better ways to merge traditional Native practices with western behavioral health to ensure cultural competency, as well as to develop mechanisms to effect system- and policy-level changes that reduce barriers to care and promote the well-being of AI/AN youth, families, and communities.

Details

Health Disparities Among Under-served Populations: Implications for Research, Policy and Praxis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-103-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

MiRan Kim, Laee Choi, Bonnie J. Knutson and Carl P. Borchgrevink

This study aims to examine the relationships among leader–member exchange (LMX), employee voice, team–member exchange (TMX), employee job satisfaction and employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships among leader–member exchange (LMX), employee voice, team–member exchange (TMX), employee job satisfaction and employee commitment to customer service (ECCS) across the USA and Chinese cultures within the hotel context.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was completed by hotel employees across the USA (n = 315) and China (n = 363). The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings of this study imply that the relationships among constructs between two nations are very similar, with a few significant differences. Specifically, this study shows that there are significant differences between the USA and China regarding the effects of LMX on employee voice, TMX, job satisfaction and ECCS.

Research limitations/implications

The research should be extended with more than two national cultures to increase the generalizability of the research findings. Primary implication is that leader in China, and the USA should seek to build LMX quality to reap organizational benefits.

Practical implications

This study can help global hospitality firms develop management strategies effectively.

Originality/value

The study’s findings provide researchers with a better understanding of the LMX framework across USA and Chinese cultures. It also verifies the underlying relational effects among LMX and its outcomes across different nations, thus offering global hospitality organizations best management practices across cultures. Further, this study seeks to fill gaps in previous LMX and employee voice studies by providing robust explanations of the cultural influences on LMX framework across nations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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