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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Robert J. Harrington, Michael C. Ottenbacher, Laura Schmidt, Jessica C. Murray and Burkhard von Freyberg

Based on the Oktoberfest context and memory-dominant logic (MDL), the purpose of the study included assessing drivers of the perceptions of experience uniqueness; if these…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the Oktoberfest context and memory-dominant logic (MDL), the purpose of the study included assessing drivers of the perceptions of experience uniqueness; if these drivers and experience uniqueness perceptions transformed in memorable experiences; and if memorable experiences translated into enhanced life satisfaction. Based on these relationships, a typology and theory extension is provided integrating practical examples.

Design/methodology/approach

A five-factor model was tested using exploratory structural equation modeling and structural equation modeling; the factors included food and beverage quality; connectedness; experience uniqueness; meaningfulness and memorability; and life satisfaction.

Findings

Guests connectedness impacted life satisfaction perceptions. Positive perceptions of the experience uniqueness resulted in higher memorability. Food and beverage quality impacted both memorability and life satisfaction. Higher memorability resulted in higher life satisfaction. Attendee nationality impacted the relationship among several of the study’s factors.

Research limitations/implications

Progress was made on assessing the MDL concepts and translating them into quantitative values. Study results supported the impact of connectedness and product quality on perceptions of Oktoberfest experience uniqueness along with the impact of meaningfulness of the experience on life satisfaction perceptions. The authors acknowledged limitations because of one Oktoberfest beer tent focus and the weaknesses of survey methodology, limiting pre- and post-activity reporting and future investigation of moderating effects.

Practical implications

The consideration of higher order impacts (i.e. life satisfaction) is needed when delivering experiences and to entice loyalty and social media apostles. Consumers’ experience connectedness with high-quality perceptions and unique service design are likely to translate to memorable experiences, leading to life satisfaction perceptions. The concept of creating the experience “with” the customer appears to be a key aspect of memorability.

Originality/value

These results tested aspects of MDL and a typology emerged of ideal types as a modified MDL framework driven by two continua: transactional vs experiential quality and experiences designed “to” vs “with” customers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Godwin‐Charles A. Ogbeide and Robert J. Harrington

This study aims to consider how the degree of participation at various hierarchical levels impacts action plan implementation success and firm financial performance…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider how the degree of participation at various hierarchical levels impacts action plan implementation success and firm financial performance. Specifically, the study seeks to assess the relationship among organizational structure, involvement by top management, middle management, lower management and frontline employees and its effect on firm performance; and, when controlling for firm size and industry segment membership, the effect of the relationship among direct involvement effects and interacting involvement effects on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey methodology and a random sample of members in a US state restaurant association. The analysis included comparisons between groups using independent sample t tests and hierarchical regression to assess direct and interacting effects.

Findings

The findings indicate that, regardless of firm size or industry segment, the direct effects of greater top management involvement and the interaction effects of one three‐way interaction (middle management, lower management, and frontline staff) and the four‐way interaction led to higher levels of action plan success. For the longer‐term impact on financial performance, higher participative approaches used by top management and frontline staff were significantly associated with higher overall profits and financial success.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was drawn from a specific region in the USA and may not be generalizable. The study attempts to minimize the potential for non‐response bias and to ensure inter‐rater reliability but these potential threats to validity cannot be totally ruled out.

Practical implications

In general, higher top management participatory approaches are important to enhance financial and strategy implementation success, regardless of firm size. The interaction of participation by all levels of the firm is a useful approach to increase the likelihood of strategy implementation success. Top management and frontline employee participation are critical organizational levels for enhancing participative management approaches and ultimately increasing financial performance for all foodservice firms.

Originality/value

The value of this study is the consideration of the impact of participation by degree across four hierarchical levels on firm performance and plan execution success.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Robert J. Harrington, Michael C. Ottenbacher and Simon Fauser

This study aims to examine the quick service restaurant (QSR) differentiation in the minds of consumers, customers and non-customers and addresses the use of absolute…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the quick service restaurant (QSR) differentiation in the minds of consumers, customers and non-customers and addresses the use of absolute measures. The study integrated competitive context and customer vs non-customer perceptions to better understand marketing strategies and the impact on customer value.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is provided with marketing strategy, 7Ps, value positioning and outcomes. A survey instrument to assess perceptions of QSR marketing mix dimensions and leading QSR brands as referents was used. The study used exploratory factor analysis, ANOVA and logistic regression to address research questions.

Findings

The five QSR brands were differentiated by three marketing mix dimensions: quality, convenience and price. Subway and Starbucks customers perceived higher quality than McDonald’s and Burger King. Price separated Starbucks and McDonald’s customers. Overall, QSR customers perceived higher quality and convenience than non-customers. Age group was a predictor of customer membership of QSR overall and McDonald’s.

Research limitations/implications

The study used participants in Germany and had more respondents identified as McDonald’s customers or referent.

Practical implications

The quality bundle represents unique resources for each QSR brand. Management teams should use a holistic mindset in considering the quality bundle reputation and how the various attributes support each other.

Originality/value

Consumers look to three factors for QSR rather than 7Ps: quality, convenience and price. Relative comparisons of perceptions among brands and between customers vs non-customers provided important contributions for QSR marketing mix factors.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Tim Baker, Aysajan Eziz and Robert J. Harrington

This paper aims to (1) organize the open literature on hotel revenue management systems, (2) compare practitioner systems in terms of functionality and (3) integrate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to (1) organize the open literature on hotel revenue management systems, (2) compare practitioner systems in terms of functionality and (3) integrate (1)-(2) into research stream recommendations for the open literature with an empirical focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use Nickerson’s taxonomy development method from the field of information systems to build the taxonomy.

Findings

New forecasting areas include developing a metric for the degree of strategic fit of a hotel’s pricing strategy and using it in conjunction with quantifications of online reviews for predictions. New price optimization avenues include determining whether a lack of congruence between customer perceptions of fairness and trust and pricing history has a detrimental effect on overall hotel performance and determining which combinations of flexible products, decision-maker risk aversion, nonparametric forecasting and reference effect optimization features work best in which situations.

Originality/value

This is the first study to combine vendor activities outside the technical realms of forecasting and price optimization with an emphasis on the choice modeling technical framework. This study points to several promising studies using qualitative methods, action research and design science.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Robert J. Harrington, Prakash K. Chathoth, Michael Ottenbacher and Levent Altinay

The purpose of this study is to review the hospitality and tourism strategy literature to identify trends related to key topical areas of research. The study objectives…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the hospitality and tourism strategy literature to identify trends related to key topical areas of research. The study objectives include identifying hospitality and tourism strategy challenges; presenting a synthesis of frequent strategy topics; and identifying opportunities for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Earlier studies in the hospitality strategy literature were reviewed and synthesized to identify trends, gaps and opportunities.

Findings

Hospitality strategy research continues to improve and extend the boundaries of strategic thought in the hospitality literature. In assessing the literature from 1980 to 2013, it was apparent that the literature was following the mainstream trend of combining theoretical perspectives to some degree as well as applying more process-based concepts to hospitality strategy research. There were several challenges for propelling hospitality strategy research forward; these included the educational infrastructure, theory development and the quantity and quality of researchers in the field.

Research limitations/implications

Given the depth and breadth of the strategy topics and research, it was difficult to ensure sufficient coverage was provided in the limited space of one journal article.

Originality/value

The study provides a good foundational understanding of where the hospitality strategy research had been and the trajectory of where it was headed. Further, it serves as a valuable resource for current researchers and those entering this area of research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Michael C. Ottenbacher and Robert J. Harrington

This paper aims to outline the innovation process activities described by quick‐service restaurant (QSR) managers and to compare it with an earlier QSR process model and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the innovation process activities described by quick‐service restaurant (QSR) managers and to compare it with an earlier QSR process model and with those used in other food service settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Six semi‐structured interviews with QSR chain executives in the USA were conducted to better understand the underlying factors and dimensions that describe successful innovation process practices.

Findings

For new QSR menu innovations, the development teams follow a structured approach to reduce the likelihood of failure due to issues such as poor consumer demand or implementation. QSR screen new food innovations approximately five times during the development process. Furthermore, today's QSR innovation process integrates more sophisticated market research technology and a post‐audit is carried out after the new food concept has been launched. In comparison with studies of Michelin‐starred chefs QSR development teams use an approach that is much more explicitly structured as a whole due to the larger scale roll‐out as well as greater cross‐functional and regional differences to consider in the QSR setting.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one country and on a small sample. Based on an analysis of the findings, the innovation development process of QSR can be broken down into 13 main steps. Compared with earlier hospitality innovation studies, the process in this setting includes multiple screenings for high‐risk innovations, and greater emphasis on operational and training issues.

Originality/value

The study expands the scope of hospitality innovation research and the findings have important implications not only for QSR settings but also for other restaurant segments, and for other hospitality service endeavours.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Robert J. Harrington and Michael C. Ottenbacher

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of strategic management topic representation within the academic field of hospitality. The study addresses the following…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of strategic management topic representation within the academic field of hospitality. The study addresses the following questions: what is the frequency of articles related to the topic of strategy in recent hospitality journals? How does the content of these articles differ from the more general field of strategic management? And, what are the potential gaps where researchers in the hospitality field can make contributions?

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at the number and percentage of strategy-related articles published in leading hospitality journals for 2005 through 2009. The determination of the percentage of strategy-related articles published and categorizing these articles by key strategy topic area required several steps: defining strategic management as an academic area within hospitality; determining key strategy topic areas and key words or terms; and defining characteristics of the hospitality field that may impact what is and what is not strategic management in hospitality. Hospitality journal articles were then coded as strategy-related or other, and (if determined to be strategy-related) the articles were categorized into one of ten key topic areas.

Findings

Overall strategy articles represent about 27 percent of the total journal articles from the five-year period. In comparing hospitality journals to the sole top-tier business journal focusing on strategy, this study indicates differences exist among key topic areas of focus. These differences seem to indicate that researchers in general strategic management tend to focus on less applied and more theoretical notions of strategy where researchers in hospitality strategic management tend to focus on more tactical methods when addressing questions of strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study are: the study focuses on four hospitality journals and the top-rated general strategy journal; and categorizing strategy articles was done using inter-judge reliability by the authors. Future research might identify a socially constructed definition of strategic management in hospitality.

Practical implications

The importance of strategic management and strategic thinking in hospitality and hospitality research has never been greater. With increasing turbulence in the global environment, the field of hospitality (and its related research) must assess and provide strategic approaches to address challenges and opportunities for the future.

Originality/value

The value of this study is in providing an overview of what has been studied in hospitality strategy in the recent past and pointing out future research opportunities for hospitality strategic management issues.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Michael Ottenbacher and Robert J. Harrington

This paper aims to compare and contrast the innovation process described by Michelin‐starred chefs with existing theoretical innovation process models.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare and contrast the innovation process described by Michelin‐starred chefs with existing theoretical innovation process models.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi structured interviews with Michelin‐starred chefs in Germany were conducted to better understand the underlying factors and dimensions that describe process practices. A sample of 12 Michelin‐starred chefs awarded one, two or the maximum of three stars were interviewed about how they develop new food creations in their restaurants.

Findings

Research results indicated that the development process of Michelin‐starred chefs has similarities and differences to traditional concepts of new product development. Michelin‐starred chefs' innovation processes do not include a business analysis stage and because of the simultaneity of production and consumption and the importance of human factors in service delivery, employees play a more important role in fine dining innovation than in other product innovation situations. Furthermore, Michelin‐starred chefs' innovation processes do not implement an all‐encompassing evaluation system.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one country and on a small sample. Based on an analysis of the findings, the innovation development process of Michelin chefs can be broken down into seven main steps.

Originality/value

The present study expands the scope of hospitality innovation research and the findings have not only important implications for high‐end restaurant settings but also other restaurant segments, and other hospitality service endeavors.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Keith F. Müller, Dawn VanLeeuwen, Keith Mandabach and Robert J. Harrington

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare current culinary student, graduated culinary student, and industry responses to educational skills attained.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare current culinary student, graduated culinary student, and industry responses to educational skills attained.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a survey methodology to examine perceptions of what and how institutions might best prepare culinary students for success in the workplace.

Findings

Students enter culinary education institutions with expectations of the experience they will gain and the skills/knowledge they will master. After graduation, they discover how prepared they are for a culinary career. Similarly, employers expect students to enter the work place with specific skills and abilities. Findings provide both similarities and differences among the respondent groups.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one country using graduates from one culinary school and industry needs of Eastern Canada. Based on an analysis of the findings, educators and industry should address key skills of the culinary profession to ensure culinarian success and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The present study provides evidence of the strengths and weaknesses of the North American culinary education process using a triangulated approach. The findings have important implications for culinary education as well as other hospitality‐related educational programs.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Robert J. Harrington and Michael C. Ottenbacher

This exploratory study aims to investigate the national adoption of international wine industry trends in Germany. Specifically, the paper consider this adoption as…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to investigate the national adoption of international wine industry trends in Germany. Specifically, the paper consider this adoption as perceived by luxury German wine producers in three wine regions. This study addresses two main questions: what impact do regional German traditions have on techniques used by small wine producers in the super‐premium + segment? Are these traditions balanced with the adoption of New World techniques and trends in viticulture and viniculture?

Design/methodology/approach

Due to the complex nature of the research questions and to provide rich, meaningful descriptions, this study adopted a qualitative method. The researchers did semi‐structured interviews with five highly respected German winemakers in the Rheingau, Württemberg and Baden regions.

Findings

This study shows that German wine producers are heavily influenced by Old World philosophy and traditions as well as New World concepts and technology. Successful wine producers appear to create a balance between the gastronomic identity of the region with advantages of new technologies, business models and trends. Research limitations/implications – The study has been conducted in only three wine regions in Germany. In addition, this study employed the case study approach. Future research could use large sample proposition testing to investigate if the findings from this study can be statistically confirmed and are applicable to other countries.

Practical implications

German wine producers can learn much from New World business models. In particular, revised organizational forms that allow wine producers increased access to travel and promotion of products can assist in increasing demand for quality products as well as on‐going learning through interaction with others in the industry.

Originality/value

German wine is an important subject for academic study, however, it is under‐researched. This exploratory study provides several implications for small to medium‐sized wine producers in Germany.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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