Search results

1 – 7 of 7
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Robert Gulbro and Paul Herbig

In this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiation is becoming an increasingly important part of the management and marketing process for nearly every firm…

Abstract

In this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiation is becoming an increasingly important part of the management and marketing process for nearly every firm. Compares the cross‐cultural negotiation behaviour and differences in the perceived processes between those firms which consider themselves North American‐focused and those firms which report a worldwide or international outlook. Proposes several hypotheses, reports significant differences between the two groups and provides analysis.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Robert Gulbro and Paul Herbig

Suggests that, in this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiations are becoming increasingly important in the management and marketing process of many…

Abstract

Suggests that, in this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiations are becoming increasingly important in the management and marketing process of many companies. Compares the cross‐cultural negotiation behaviour and differences in the perceived processes between product‐oriented and consumer‐product firms. Reports on significant differences between the two groups and provides analysis.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 96 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Robert D. Gulbro, Linda Shonesy and Paul Dreyfus

Several manufacturing firms were surveyed to find answers to questions about their manufacturing quality, and to determine what activities they were using in achieving…

Abstract

Several manufacturing firms were surveyed to find answers to questions about their manufacturing quality, and to determine what activities they were using in achieving quality products. Firms of all sizes were queried and smaller firms were compared to larger firms. Attempts at finding significant differences between small and large firms were successful. The responses of the larger firms demonstrated that significant differences exist when compared to the smaller firms in a variety of continuous improvement activities that are a part of the process used to achieve higher levels of quality.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 100 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Robert D. Gulbro and Paul Herbig

In this age of the global economy, negotiating across cultures is an inevitable part of doing business for firms desiring to compete internationally. What problems could…

Abstract

In this age of the global economy, negotiating across cultures is an inevitable part of doing business for firms desiring to compete internationally. What problems could cultural differences cause? Can firms from some countries or cultures do better than firms from other countries? What problems might firms from one culture encounter compared to firms from other cultures? To study these questions, cross‐cultural negotiating behaviour was examined using Hofstede’s criteria, to see if some firms may have a cultural competitive advantage. Assumptions about the effects of national cultures were proposed and tested, and differences between cultures were found. Additional research was also suggested.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1994

Paul Herbig, John C. Milewicz and Robert Gulbro

Marketing signals, whereupon marketing activities provide informationbeyond the activity itself, can be implemented in a variety of marketingactivities including…

Abstract

Marketing signals, whereupon marketing activities provide information beyond the activity itself, can be implemented in a variety of marketing activities including advertising, pricing, quality control, and competitive reactions. Examines marketing signals as they are used in the industrial marketplace. Provides examples and specific applications for each specific characteristic associated with industrial marketing. Also provides observations and recommendations on their usage by industrial concerns.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 94 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Robert Gulbro and Paul Herbig

In this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiation isbecoming an increasingly important part of the management and marketingprocess for nearly every firm…

Abstract

In this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiation is becoming an increasingly important part of the management and marketing process for nearly every firm. Compares the cross‐cultural negotiations behavior and differences in the perceived processes between industrial product firms and consumer product firms. Proposes and tests hypotheses and analyzes results.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Connie Zheng

Skill shortages worldwide have intensified the need for talent management. Few papers examine the pattern of human resource (HR) and talent management practices that help…

Abstract

Purpose

Skill shortages worldwide have intensified the need for talent management. Few papers examine the pattern of human resource (HR) and talent management practices that help retain competent employees among service multinational companies (MNCs) in Asia. The purpose of this paper is to map out a number of HR practices used by service companies and to examine the effect of talent retention as perceived by MNC managers on service delivery capacity and business growth.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey data of 281 service MNCs in six Asian countries (namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand) are used to compare country and sectoral differences. Standard multiple regression analysis is conducted to test the link between HR practices, employee retention, and service firm performance.

Findings

The results confirm that there are statistically significant linkages between HR practices, talent retention and firm performance. In particular, various skill training and development programs are seen to be significantly associated with capacity to deliver quality service and on firm growth as perceived by managers surveyed. Informal recruitment methods that are used more by Asian‐bred firms have contributed to better retention rates. Not all formalised HR practices lead to talent retention; and the degree to which HR is perceived to have impacted on firm performance varies.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on examining the perceptual impacts of human resource management (HRM) practices on firm performance, rather than actual HRM impacts. The interpretation of results should be taken with caution.

Originality/value

Talent management is influenced by country specific variables. This paper shows how important it is for service firms to focus on strategic selection of both formal and informal HR practices in order to deliver high quality service and to drive service firm growth.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7