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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Ann-Louise Holten, Gregory Robert Hancock and Anne Bøllingtoft

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of change leadership (informing, communicating, involving and supporting) and change management (reasons and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of change leadership (informing, communicating, involving and supporting) and change management (reasons and competencies for change) for organisational change processes and their outcomes across public and private organisations. The study includes three specific change situations: first, layoffs; second, mergers; and third, closures, relocations and outsourcing, focusing on how change leadership and change management relate to employees’ experience of the change processes and their outcomes across these change situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on panel data forming a representative sample of the Danish working population. A total of 2,120 responses were collected, 1,000 from public organisations and 1,120 from private organisations. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The study findings show that both change leadership and change management predict positive change experiences and change consequences – and that they do so similarly across public and private sectors. Despite this similarity, the study reveals important sectorial differences, with public sector employees reporting less positive change experiences and consequences.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable knowledge for researchers and public and private leaders interested in the impact of change leadership and change management on change outcomes.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Ann-Louise Holten, Gregory Robert Hancock, Roger Persson, Åse Marie Hansen and Annie Høgh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how knowledge hoarding, functions as antecedent and consequent of work related negative acts, as a measure of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how knowledge hoarding, functions as antecedent and consequent of work related negative acts, as a measure of bullying. The authors investigate the relation as mediated by trust and justice.

Design/methodology/approach

Data stem from a longitudinal study in which questionnaire responses were collected twice from 1,650 employees in 52 workplaces. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the two models. Design-based corrections were made to accommodate the multi-level structure of data.

Findings

The analyses showed that knowledge hoarding was both an antecedent and a consequent of negative acts. First, over time, knowledge hoarding was indirectly related to negative acts mediated by trust and justice. Second, negative acts were both directly and indirectly related to knowledge hoarding over time. The study thus points to the existence of a vicious circle of negative acts, psychological states of trust and justice, and knowledge hoarding behaviours, which presumably will affect both individual and organizational outcomes negatively.

Research limitations/implications

The use of already collected, self-report data, single-item measures, and the two-year time lag could pose potential limitations to the study.

Practical implications

Preventive and repair actions could potentially impact both negative acts and knowledge hoarding by focusing on increasing the social exchange quality at work unit level.

Originality/value

This paper combines two strands of research, that of bullying at work and that of knowledge management, within which research on knowledge hoarding has been an under-researched area.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2013

Robert Gregory and Daniel Zirker

New Zealand has long been regarded as a country with little or no governmental corruption. In recent times it has been ranked consistently as one of the five least corrupt…

Abstract

New Zealand has long been regarded as a country with little or no governmental corruption. In recent times it has been ranked consistently as one of the five least corrupt countries in the world, on Transparency International’s (TI) Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI). In 2009 and 2011 it was ranked as the single most corruption-free country on the CPI, and in 2012 it shared first place with Denmark and Finland. This chapter examines the reasons why historically New Zealand has been largely free of governmental corruption, using widely accepted definitions of what constitutes corrupt behavior. It goes on to argue that, at least by its own normal standards, the country might now be more susceptible to corruption, for a variety of reasons, in both the public and private sectors, and that more political and administrative attention may need to be paid to this issue. This chapter discusses New Zealand’s surprising tardiness in ratifying the United Nations Convention against Corruption, an apparent reluctance that leaves the country sitting alongside other non-ratifying countries which have endemic levels of corruption in all its forms. In this context, this chapter also notes some international dissatisfaction with New Zealand’s anti-money laundering legislation, enacted in 2009.

Details

Different Paths to Curbing Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-731-3

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Abstract

Details

Learning from International Public Management Reform: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-0759-3

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Abstract

Details

Different Paths to Curbing Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-731-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1968

Parker of, L.J. Diplock and J. Ashworth

March 2, 1967 Master and Servant — Redundancy — “Transfer” of trade or business — Business carried on in more than one area — Sale of assets and benefits of contracts in

Abstract

March 2, 1967 Master and Servant — Redundancy — “Transfer” of trade or business — Business carried on in more than one area — Sale of assets and benefits of contracts in one area — Whether “trade or business … transferred” — Employee continuing work with new owners — Whether continuously employed — “Employee” — Contracts of Employment Act, 1963 (c.49), Sch.I, para. 10(2) — Redundancy Payments Act, 1965 (c.62), s.l(l), Sch.I, para. 1(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2001

Rob Laking

Abstract

Details

Learning from International Public Management Reform: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-0759-3

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2006

Richard Selleck

Melbourne High School embodies the belief that the state has the right to offer secondary education, a view challenged by private interests when the school that became…

Abstract

Melbourne High School embodies the belief that the state has the right to offer secondary education, a view challenged by private interests when the school that became Melbourne High School was first proposed. It also affirms the conviction that state secondary schools play a crucial part in the opening of educational opportunities to all students. 2005 was the year of Melbourne High School’s centenary and this paper uses that occasion to reflect on the social optimism and determination of those who fought to establish the school and on the narrowness and arrogance of the market view of education that motivated many of those who opposed the state’s entry into secondary education. It also reflects on the appeals to the free market that many politicians, educational administrators and school principals today use to protect social and economic privilege

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Gregory B. Murphy and Robert Hill

Entrepreneurship researchers use various types of screening criteria to select samples for study. In that selecting these criteria is, in effect, choosing a definition or…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship researchers use various types of screening criteria to select samples for study. In that selecting these criteria is, in effect, choosing a definition or model of entrepreneurship, the consequences are immense and have had a direct impact on the generalizability of research and theory development in our field. The purpose of this study is to help entrepreneurship researchers better understand these consequences and, thereby, improve our understanding of entrepreneurial phenomenon. Four of the most commonly used screening criteria are included in this study: firm age, firm size, firm growth, and innovation. Based on a sample of 368 manufacturing firms, the results indicate that few firms fit all or even most of the considered screening criteria and independent-dependent variable relationships vary considerably by screening criteria selection.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Gregory D. Hanson, Robert L. Parsons and Wesley N. Musser

The 1997 merger of two USDA agencies, the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service and the Farmers Home Administration, into the Farm Service Agency created a…

Abstract

The 1997 merger of two USDA agencies, the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service and the Farmers Home Administration, into the Farm Service Agency created a need for consistent finance training. A highly successful Penn State Cooperative Extension borrower training program was selected to provide national financial training to more than 850 new staff and former loan technicians, and former ASCS staff and district directors. Analysis of workshop evaluations, based on pre‐workshop knowledge levels, identified five distinct clusters of trainees differing substantially in terms of experience, age, knowledge of finance principles, and job classification within FSA. However, evaluations confirmed testing results that the financial training was equally effective across all clusters. A critical result was that the training was successfully adapted to accommodate the distinct needs of each trainee cluster.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 62 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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