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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

André de Waal, Dalia S.F. Habil and Robert Goedegebuure

Nowadays, it is rare to find an organization that operates in isolation, without the need to partner with other organizations. Partnerships offer firms access to new technologies…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays, it is rare to find an organization that operates in isolation, without the need to partner with other organizations. Partnerships offer firms access to new technologies, markets, and knowledge. During the process of transforming into a high performance organization (HPO), an organization will eventually find itself operating within a bigger value chain. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors and practices that can help Egyptian ICT companies to become better members in such a partnership, in a way that enables full benefit to be gained from the partnership.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a questionnaire based on the high performance partnership (HPP) framework that has previously been validated in the Western and Asian contexts. The questionnaire was distributed to seven Egyptian ICT organizations who partnered with each other, after which a exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed on the collected data to identify the factors that influence the success of partnerships between Egyptian ICT companies.

Findings

The EFA showed that five (of the original ten) factors from the HPP Framework achieved a high reliability while 47 of the original 54 underlying characteristics applied in the Egyptian ICT context. In addition, these five HPP factors had strong positive relations with the success of the partnership as perceived by partners. Interestingly, the HPO scores of individual partners also had a positive effect on the perceived success of the partnership.

Originality/value

This study fills the lacuna that currently exists in empirical research about organizational performance practices in Egypt. The study also has practical implications, as management of Egyptian ICT companies are now able to undertake focused improvement actions to increase the success of the partnerships into which they enter.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

André de Waal and Robert Goedegebuure

An important question in contemporary research is: do certain management practices cause better performance or do better performing organizations find it easier to adopt certain…

Abstract

Purpose

An important question in contemporary research is: do certain management practices cause better performance or do better performing organizations find it easier to adopt certain management practices? This question is also of importance when applying the high performance organization (HPO) framework, which is a scientifically validated technique designed to achieve and sustain a high level of performance. Many research studies correlate the HPO framework with improved organizational performance. There are, however, no studies which explicitly look at the causal relationship. This paper aims to provide empirical evidence of causality.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal research was conducted at two companies. An HPO diagnosis was conducted at each company, after which management implemented the HPO framework. Two units at each company were selected as case studies. Data were collected, using a questionnaire and interviews, at the beginning and after 18 months, when the diagnoses were repeated. A linear regression analysis was performed to interpret the data.

Findings

Despite exposure to the same HPO framework techniques, organizational units achieved significantly different outcomes. In each company, one unit achieved a higher HPO score and higher organizational results, while the other unit had no change, or a lower HPO score and lower organizational results. The key factor was the manner in which unit managers applied the HPO framework.

Practical implications

Optimal effectiveness for the HPO framework occurs when management incorporates the HPO factors into the workplace and strives diligently to improve performance.

Originality/value

This research responds to the question “Do certain management practices cause better performance or do better performing organizations find it easier to adopt certain management practices?”

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2017

Suhail Sultan, André de Waal and Robert Goedegebuure

Many businesses in the world are family-owned. A family-owned business differs from other types of businesses in several ways, because it is composed of both a family and a…

Abstract

Purpose

Many businesses in the world are family-owned. A family-owned business differs from other types of businesses in several ways, because it is composed of both a family and a business. A recurring question in management research has been: which type of business performs better, the family-owned or the non-family owned? An alternative question which in this respect can also be asked, in the light of the high-performance organization (HPO) theory which has become popular these past years, is: which type of business is more likely to become and stay high performing, the family-owned or the non-family owned? To try to answer these questions, many studies have been done in which the performance of family firms was compared with firms that have no family ties, but these studies gave mixed results and conflicting opinions. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

It seems evident that a new research approach is needed. A way forward is to use the HPO concept which looks at the factors important for an organization to become an HPO. Thus, the research question which this study attempts to answer is: are there differences in performance between family and non-family businesses, and if so, can these be traced back to differences in the way these businesses deal with the factors of high performance? The research used the HPO questionnaire and interviews to collect data at Palestine family and non-family owned businesses.

Findings

The research shows that Palestine non-family businesses significantly outperform family-owned businesses. Family businesses thus seem “a living paradox.” Balancing family interest and business interest often requires a compromise between family and business goals. It seems that Palestinian family businesses focus more on family interest by putting the goal of survival and “keeping the business in the family” above (short-term) financial goals. Family businesses might also feel more that the company’s money is the family money, and as a result their investment and expenses strategies are more conservative thus missing possible economic investment opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The study results add to the current debate in the literature about which type of business performs better, and at the same time they add knowledge because if there are differences these might be explained by the factors of high performance. In this vein, the study results also contribute to the literature on high performance, as the HPO framework has not been used before for this type of comparative research.

Originality/value

The study results have practical value because they yield knowledge about the ways to organize a business so it can achieve high organizational results which is of great value to managers attempting to make their organizations perform better.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

André de Waal, Dalia S.F. Habil and Robert Goedegebuure

The purpose of this paper is to deal with the need for Egyptian ICT companies to adopt high performance practices in order to be able to contribute more to the development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deal with the need for Egyptian ICT companies to adopt high performance practices in order to be able to contribute more to the development of Egypt. However, as not much research has been done into management practices which can support these organizations in the Egyptian context, a framework which was developed based on Western and non-Western data – the high performance organization (HPO) framework – was tested on its suitability in the Egyptian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a questionnaire which was distributed to seven Egyptian ICT organizations after which a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed on the collected data.

Findings

The CFA showed that the original five factors from the HPO framework achieved a high reliability while 26 out of the original 35 underlying characteristics applied in the Egyptian ICT context.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap which currently exists in empirical research about organization performance practices in Egypt. The study also has practical implications as management of Egyptian ICT companies are now able to undertake focussed improvement actions.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

André de Waal, Robert Goedegebuure and Patricia Geradts

In recent years many organizations have implemented performance management because this technique leads to better organizational results as reported in many articles and case…

8465

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years many organizations have implemented performance management because this technique leads to better organizational results as reported in many articles and case studies. However, often the reported improvement relates to qualitative performance and there is little solid empirical evidence of the actual effects performance management has on the quantitative results of organizations. This article aims to describe the results of a study that explored the quantitative impact of performance management on the results of a non‐profit organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative performance data of the organization, before and after the introduction of performance management, were collected and linked to key activities and events that occurred in the organization during and after the implementation.

Findings

The research shows that several key activities related to the introduction of performance management have an impact on the results of an organization although not always in an expected positive way.

Research limitations/implications

A research limitation is that it is always difficult to isolate the effects of a particular event on the overall results of an organization. Although the effects of other events have been taken into account, it cannot be ruled out that unlisted events and factors are in play.

Practical implications

The results support managers who want to introduce performance management to improve the results of their non‐profit organisation. At the same time, the research indicates that introducing and using performance management needs continuous attention of management in order to become and stay successful in the long run.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the literature as it is one of the few longitudinal research studies into the effects of performance management, specifically in non‐profit organizations.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 60 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

André de Waal, Robert Goedegebuure and Eveline Hinfelaar

The importance of partnerships to organizational success has increased considerably the past decennia and many organizations strive at creating high-performance partnerships…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of partnerships to organizational success has increased considerably the past decennia and many organizations strive at creating high-performance partnerships (HPPs). For this to happen, organizations in the partnerships have to be of high quality and their collaborations should be world-class. Whereas the factors that create high-performance organizations (HPO) are by now reasonably well established, the HPP factors are still unclear. The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale for measuring the factors of importance for creating and maintaining HPPs, and relates these factors to the factors of the HPO framework and to the success of the partnership.

Design/methodology/approach

During a literature study ten potential factors of importance for creating and maintaining HPPs were identified. These potential factors were put in a questionnaire, together with the factors that create the HPO and the factor that measures the success of the partnership. This questionnaire was administered to a cable company, which was working on becoming an HPO, and four of its main suppliers. The data were subjected to a factor analysis which yielded a HPP framework consisting of three factors and 19 underlying characteristics. In addition, these HPP factors were put in a regression analysis with the factors of the HPO framework and the success of the partnership factor.

Findings

The research results show a strong relationship between three HPP factors, the five HPO factors, and the success of a partnership factor.

Research limitations/implications

This research adds to the literature by extending the concept of HPOs to the value chain these HPOs operate in. Thus the research into the factors of successful partnerships has been brought forward. The practical benefit of the research is that organizations can use the HPP factors to increase the quality of the partnerships they have with their suppliers and customers.

Originality/value

There is much literature on partnerships but not so much on partnerships between organizations which strive to become a HPOs, and in the process need to create partnership of high quality.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Andre A. de Waal, Robert Goedegebuure and Chiraprapha Tan Akaraborworn

The purpose of this study is evaluate whether the high performance organization (HPO) framework can satisfy the recent urgent request of Thai business leaders to create a unique…

892

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is evaluate whether the high performance organization (HPO) framework can satisfy the recent urgent request of Thai business leaders to create a unique organization which is better able to deal with unpredictable circumstances and increased competition. To establish the suitability of the HPO Framework it first has to be made sure that this framework is applicable to the Thai business context as previous research has shown that management techniques originating from the Western world cannot be indiscriminately transferred into non-Western contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

During several workshops and seminars in Bangkok, participants were asked to complete the HPO questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using a second-order confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate whether the data on the 35 items in the HPO framework group into the five independent factors: continuous improvement, openness and action orientation, management quality, workforce quality and long-term orientation.

Findings

The data yielded, with a high reliability, four of the five HPO factors as present in the original HPO framework. The dropped items were either confounded with other factors or items that may be another dimension in the data or a sub-dimension of other factors. The long-term orientation factor was dropped, as the accompanying items did not unidimensionally measure this construct. This did not mean that long-term orientation (LTO) is not relevant in the Thai context; there simply were no items included that measured LTO properly in the Thai context.

Research implications

The HPO framework proved to be a validated and valuable technique for Thai organizations to improve in a sustainable way. Further research should focus on testing the HPO framework in practice by implementing the framework in Thai organizations and then tracking the performance of these organizations over time. In this way, it can be evaluated if the advantages experienced by organizations while applying the HPO framework can also be enjoyed by Thai organizations.

Originality/value

This is the first research into the validity of the HPO framework in the specific Thai context.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

287

Abstract

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Sushanta Kumar Sarma

The purpose of this paper is to understand how social enterprises (SEs) sustain social focus as they shift their legal format from nonprofit to for-profit. The investigation is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how social enterprises (SEs) sustain social focus as they shift their legal format from nonprofit to for-profit. The investigation is driven by the understanding that historical persistence of organizational action can influence the sustenance of social focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach and traces the commercialization process of two microfinance organization from India. The data come from interviews and archival documents spanning across the biography of the selected organizations. The constitutive elements of the commercialization process are identified by using the lens of path creation.

Findings

Evidence suggests that the framing of purpose for microfinance as empowerment of women formed the triggering event to path creation. The organizations retained the focus on social goal by adopting a community centered delivery model of self-help groups. The organizational practices adopted after commercialization helped these organization to address the issues of drift actively.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that framing of organizational purpose can play a crucial role in sustaining hybrid character in SEs. It reinforces earlier findings that stakeholders can exert significant influence in balancing social and commercial goal. The aspiration to be identified as a pro-community organization is another critical driver in sustaining social focus. Finally, for SEs to sustain their social focus, proactive engagement with the community should become an integral part of organizational practices.

Originality/value

The paper explores the constitutive elements of path creation and demonstrates the sustenance of social focus through three stages of organizational path development. It also offers insights into the literature on historical imprinting by exploring the internal process through which imprinting is sustained and amplified and by presenting sources and outcome of imprinting.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Séverine Louvel

This paper analyses French and US universities’ organizational responses to the more or less explicit pressures they face to go interdisciplinary. Defining universities as…

Abstract

This paper analyses French and US universities’ organizational responses to the more or less explicit pressures they face to go interdisciplinary. Defining universities as pluralistic organizations, I show that the implementation of interdisciplinary research does not result in well-integrated institutional strategies, but rather combines initiatives from the scientific community and from university leaders. Based on case studies conducted on the development of interdisciplinary nanomedicine in five leading French and US research universities, I identify three settings where the implementation of interdisciplinarity involves shifts in organizational structure – in principal investigator-based research teams and scientific networks, in departmental boundaries, and in institutional structures, and question issues of governance, leadership and resource allocation arising from those shifts. We see similarities between the two countries in terms of how initiatives by “entrepreneurial academics” – searching for funds for interdisciplinary research – and by the university leadership – also searching for funds, and redefining institutional projects around interdisciplinarity – complement each other. We also identify one major difference – with French pro-interdisciplinary university policies being strongly influenced by a political impetus from the French ministry of higher education and research.

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