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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Robert G. Schwartz and Richard D. Teach

Although unproven, many researchers have assumed that firm strategies remain constant over time, but such conclusions have resulted in conflicting generalizations. This study…

Abstract

Although unproven, many researchers have assumed that firm strategies remain constant over time, but such conclusions have resulted in conflicting generalizations. This study further extends the use of interpoint distance methodology to compare factor structures of marketing strategies of entrepreneurial technology firms at two points‐in‐time – 1989 and 1998.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Robert G. Schwartz and Richard D. Teach

To most, opportunity recognition and exploitation are the key activities of entrepreneurship. In their 1989 paper on the subject the authors identified a factor structure useful…

1173

Abstract

To most, opportunity recognition and exploitation are the key activities of entrepreneurship. In their 1989 paper on the subject the authors identified a factor structure useful in explaining the process. The present work compares the 1998 results with the 1989 results. Evidence is provided that there is a stable temporal model of opportunity recognition and exploitation.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Jonathan Deacon, Vincent J. Pascal and Robert G. Schwartz

This paper seeks to explore linguistic nuances in responses to the definition of marketing for entrepreneurs in technology and non‐technology firms located in the US and UK. The…

358

Abstract

This paper seeks to explore linguistic nuances in responses to the definition of marketing for entrepreneurs in technology and non‐technology firms located in the US and UK. The present study focuses on an open ended marketing question and applies a hermeneutic analysis to the data. The results appear to suggest that differences exist between US and their UK counterparts on how they define marketing, such that UK firms “individualize” their application of marketing while the US firms “professionalize” the function.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Richard D. Teach and Robert G. Schwartz

This paper is the third report on an enlarging worldwide study of university students’ attitudes and opinions related to e‐commerce. The data set is made up of over 600 business…

1793

Abstract

This paper is the third report on an enlarging worldwide study of university students’ attitudes and opinions related to e‐commerce. The data set is made up of over 600 business majors distributed between three US and one Australian university. The purpose of the study was to explore students’ attitudes and opinions related to e‐commerce and how those varied based on gender, technology adeptness, shopping intensity, and university affiliation. Differences did exist between the more and less technology adept shoppers. In addition, differences existed between those who had higher or lower shopping intensity. Gender and university affiliation appeared to play little role. These differences perhaps could be utilized by entrepreneurial e‐commerce firms to make their sites more efficient for shopping cart completions and, in this case, for student shoppers. E‐marketing at the entrepreneurship interface appeared similar for students in English speaking countries.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Can Uslay, Richard D. Teach and Robert G. Schwartz

Globalization, and more recently the dot‐com era, has increased worldwide interest in new business development. As a result, having an international perspective on the study of…

Abstract

Globalization, and more recently the dot‐com era, has increased worldwide interest in new business development. As a result, having an international perspective on the study of entrepreneurship has become more important for researcher and practitioner alike. One aspect of this enhanced interest is a worldwide interest in student entrepreneurs. It is no surprise that differences in attitudes towards entrepreneurship have been considered a major factor as to why some economies are more entrepreneurial and vibrant than others. By exploring US, Turkish, and Spanish business students’ attitudes, interests, and related country cultural influences towards entrepreneurship, this research builds upon and serves to extend the understanding of such issues.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Robert G. Schwartz, Richard D. Teach and Nancy J. Birch

The purpose of this article is to analyze both the opportunity recognition and product development management processes not only among technology firms, but among non‐technology…

2315

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to analyze both the opportunity recognition and product development management processes not only among technology firms, but among non‐technology firms as well at two points in time, 1998 and 2003.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study included two data sets: a 1998 survey of technology‐based and non‐technology firms located in US incubators; and a new 2003 study of technology and non‐technology based firms in the Inland Northwest. All respondents indicated they considered themselves entrepreneurs.

Findings

Findings suggest that the opportunity recognition process changed between 1998 and 2003. Some of the authors' prior work suggested that the process, at least for technology‐based firms, had been similar between 1989 and 1998. Industry changes over time, perhaps different firm types, and insufficient data could be rational reasons for the changes. Thus, as far as the opportunity recognition process then, there is evidence that suggests that the process is different for manufacturing and non‐manufacturing firms.

Practical implications

The study of management and marketing processes should be performed by industry or business type over time. The researcher should consider that if the opportunity recognition or product development management processes reflect the changing nature of entrepreneurship over time, then characterizing those processes as constant models is inappropriate.

Originality/value

The overall results are consistent with other research studies and serve to further substantiate the use of single industry data. An “equation of state” for an opportunity recognition model or a product development management model is suggested by the empirical results reported on in the current paper as well as the diversity of other researchers' work.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Robert G. Schwartz

1561

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Brian Grinder, Vincent J. Pascal and Robert G. Schwartz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the early American clock industry as an entrepreneurial endeavor and to focus on the innovative marketing and financing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the early American clock industry as an entrepreneurial endeavor and to focus on the innovative marketing and financing practices that helped transform the industry during the first half of the nineteenth century.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the historical method to identify the critical factors that allowed the clock industry to expand. Primary sources were consulted whenever they were available, and a survey of the existing clock literature was conducted.

Findings

The nineteenth century New England clock industry provides a rich field of exploration into the entrepreneurial practices of the early American Republic and provides us with many insights that are applicable to the modern entrepreneur. The clock makers and peddlers who moved clock making from a backwater cottage industry to a modern international industry are examples of entrepreneurship at its best. From a marketing perspective, the clockmakers made use of the existing peddler system in order to create a market for their products. From a financial perspective, the clockmakers innovated when a ready source of capital was unavailable and made extensive use of credit.

Practical implications

This paper points out the importance of viewing entrepreneurship from a historical perspective. Furthermore, it finds that successful clock entrepreneurs understand the usefulness of connections, recognize traps to be avoided (such as the “Cottage Industry Syndrome”), and resolve to be persistent and optimistic in the face of adversity.

Originality/value

This is the first study of the early American clock industry to consider the entrepreneurial aspects that contributed to its successful transformation into an international industry.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Jonathan H. Deacon

399

Abstract

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

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