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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rebecca Beals and Robert Fiala

This report provides information on the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disability, and the implications of that environment for the inclusion and…

Abstract

Purpose

This report provides information on the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disability, and the implications of that environment for the inclusion and participation of disabled persons in society. We place that environment within an historical context sensitive to the role of power and the constructed nature of the social world to illustrate the importance of cultural environments for understanding factors shaping inclusion of disabled persons.

Design/methodology/approach

We use data from coding terms used in the Review of Educational Research for nearly 80 years to examine the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disabilities and suggest such an environment may characterize many professions and the social sciences generally. We examine 23 terms used in academic discourse to refer to disabled populations, tracking change in use of the terms over 80 years.

Findings

There has been increased attention to disability from the 1930s to the early 2000s. The increase has been accompanied by a decline in use of terms undermining the dignity and capability of disabled persons, and an increase in terms providing a context for dignity and capability. Such changes suggest a cultural environment propitious for inclusion and participation of disabled and disadvantaged persons.

Social implications

Implications are considered through a model noting the role of a positive cultural environment in shaping inclusion and participation of disabled populations. The model suggests the power and limitations of cultural environments, while at the same time noting the role of countervailing processes hindering greater inclusion and participation.

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from…

Abstract

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from unstructured supply chain practices, lack of awareness of the implications of the sustainability concept and failure to recycle poultry wastes. The current research thus attempts to develop an integrated supply chain model in the context of poultry industry in Bangladesh. The study considers both sustainability and supply chain issues in order to incorporate them in the poultry supply chain. By placing the forward and reverse supply chains in a single framework, existing problems can be resolved to gain economic, social and environmental benefits, which will be more sustainable than the present practices.

The theoretical underpinning of this research is ‘sustainability’ and the ‘supply chain processes’ in order to examine possible improvements in the poultry production process along with waste management. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and ‘design science’ methods with the support of system dynamics (SD) and the case study methods. Initially, a mental model is developed followed by the causal loop diagram based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and observation techniques. The causal model helps to understand the linkages between the associated variables for each issue. Finally, the causal loop diagram is transformed into a stock and flow (quantitative) model, which is a prerequisite for SD-based simulation modelling. A decision support system (DSS) is then developed to analyse the complex decision-making process along the supply chains.

The findings reveal that integration of the supply chain can bring economic, social and environmental sustainability along with a structured production process. It is also observed that the poultry industry can apply the model outcomes in the real-life practices with minor adjustments. This present research has both theoretical and practical implications. The proposed model’s unique characteristics in mitigating the existing problems are supported by the sustainability and supply chain theories. As for practical implications, the poultry industry in Bangladesh can follow the proposed supply chain structure (as par the research model) and test various policies via simulation prior to its application. Positive outcomes of the simulation study may provide enough confidence to implement the desired changes within the industry and their supply chain networks.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Abstract

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Sustainability Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-481-3

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Karlijn Massar, Annika Nübold, Robert van Doorn and Karen Schelleman-Offermans

There is an abundance of empirical evidence on the positive effects of employment – and the detrimental effects of unemployment – on individuals’ psychological and…

Abstract

There is an abundance of empirical evidence on the positive effects of employment – and the detrimental effects of unemployment – on individuals’ psychological and physical health and well-being. In this chapter, the authors explore whether and how self-employment or entrepreneurship could be a solution for individuals’ (re)entry to the job market and which (psychological) variables enhance the likelihood of entrepreneurial success. Specifically, the authors first focus on unemployment and its detrimental effects for health and wellbeing, and outline the existing interventions aimed at assisting reemployment and combating the negative consequences of unemployment for individuals’ well-being. Then, the authors will explore entrepreneurship as a potential solution to unemployment and explore the psychological variables that enhance the likelihood of entrepreneurial success. One of the variables the authors highlight as particularly relevant for self-employment is the second-order construct of Psychological Capital (PsyCap; Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007), as well as its individual components – hope, optimism, efficacy, and resilience. PsyCap is a malleable construct that can be successfully trained, and PsyCap interventions are inherently strength-based and have positive effects on employees’ and entrepreneurs’ performance and wellbeing. Therefore, the authors end the chapter by suggesting that a PsyCap component in existing education and training programs for entrepreneurship is likely to not only increase entrepreneurial intentions and success, but also increases participants’ well-being, self-esteem, and the general confidence they can pick up the reigns and take back control over their (professional) lives.

Details

Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2012

Mike Adebamowo and Adetokunbo O. Ilesanmi

Buildings have a considerable impact on the environment being responsible for a substantial proportion of global energy consumption, thus contributing significantly to the…

Abstract

Buildings have a considerable impact on the environment being responsible for a substantial proportion of global energy consumption, thus contributing significantly to the anthropogenic CO2 emissions, which evidence suggests is the main cause of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation measures are required to tackle the challenges of climate change. Adaptive measures – structural and behavioural strategies – are the focus of this paper. Structural strategies include flexible and adaptive structural systems; while behavioural strategies cover the spatial, personal, and psychological control measures which may influence the design and operations of buildings. The study explores the adaptive thermal comfort of occupants and examines the design strategies for adapting buildings to climate change in the tropical context, with a view to determine the effectiveness of these strategies as observed in the case study. The study was conducted during the rainy and dry seasons in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria, located in a warm humid climate zone.

The Institute of Venture Design student hostel was used as case-study to conduct the survey on a sample of 40 respondents by means of structured questionnaire. The respondents' thermal sensation and access to thermal controls were determined, and their thermal sensation and thermal adaptability in both seasons comparatively analyzed. Indoor environmental parameters including air temperature, mean radiant temperature, relative humidity and air velocity were also measured. The data were analyzed using relevant descriptive and inferential statistics. The study discussed the effectiveness of design strategies available for building adaptation in an era of climate change within the warm humid environment, concluding on the need for greater synergy between the techno-structural and socio-behavioural dimensions of building adaptation.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Zachary Williams and Robert Moore

This paper seeks to present a framework depicting the development of information power‐based relationships between firms, and to describe the effect of information power…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a framework depicting the development of information power‐based relationships between firms, and to describe the effect of information power on long‐term relationships between supply chain partners.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper combines literature from the field of information sciences regarding information integration with literature addressing traditional power relationships to develop a set of propositions describing how interfirm relationships evolve.

Findings

The conceptual framework introduced indicates that information can be utilized as a coercive and non‐coercive power base in supply chain relationships.

Practical implications

The need for information may result in a firm utilizing either coercive or non‐coercive power as a means of obtaining it. This research provides interesting findings about the use of information, as a power base, and its role in interfirm relationships.

Originality/value

This paper combines literature from various fields to develop a needed conceptual model of information power roles within supply chain relationships.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Ian Hood

The purpose of this paper is to look at some of the experiences of people with learning disabilities in Scotland during the Independence Referendum campaign, through the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at some of the experiences of people with learning disabilities in Scotland during the Independence Referendum campaign, through the prism of a series of workshops run by a collective advocacy organisation. These workshops took an inclusive approach to the views of everyone with a learning disability.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a record of the workshops written after the event.

Findings

People with learning disabilities were engaged in the discussion and campaigns around the referendum in similar ways to other members of their communities. The issues that especially affect people with learning disabilities figured highly in the workshops. However, there was also discussion of more general issues such as employment, jobs and constitutional arrangements that affect all citizens.

Research limitations/implications

This is an observational study written up by the workshop leader and, as such, can make no claims of complete impartiality.

Practical implications

Experience of the workshops suggests that many of the barriers that prevent civic participation of people with learning disabilities may be ones of staff attitude and approach. The support offered to enable people to take part in the community may on some occasions have the opposite effect.

Social implications

Nonetheless, for those who have been able to overcome these barriers, there are signs of much greater participation in public life. This reflects an ongoing process of change with many people now joining political parties or being able to make contributions towards political debate.

Originality/value

This paper provides an important record of the growing involvement of people with learning disabilities in civil society.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Erik Masao Olsson

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare customer complaints concerning interpersonal matters in cancer care.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare customer complaints concerning interpersonal matters in cancer care.

Design/methodology/approach

Complaints from cancer patients and their relatives (n=116) that dealt with interpersonal matters registered between 2009 and 2011 at four local Patients’ Advisory Committees in Western Sweden were sampled and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Complaints concerned lack of information and consideration from healthcare providers. Lack of empathy and civility also caused dissatisfaction, the latter particularly for women. Relatives complained that they did not feel included in the care process or were not offered proper support. Most complaints by relatives were filed by a female relative and concerned a male patient.

Research limitations/implications

Information about patient demographics other than gender could not be investigated due to database limitations. Hence, factors such as age, country of birth, and geographical residence were not included for analysis. In addition, neither the type nor stage of cancer among the sampled patients was able to be addressed.

Practical implications

Patient complaints should not only be viewed as a post-consumption judgment, but also as a service interaction activity. This may require healthcare providers to enhance their interpersonal skills, allowing patients and relatives to provide feedback during service interaction to satisfactorily address dissatisfaction. Visualizing gender disparities may help healthcare providers prevent stereotypical encounters. In addition, the provider should be invited to participate in the customer’s value creating network, which may also include knowledge and skills from other sources, such as relatives.

Originality/value

Value co-creation offers a different view on patient complaints. Incorporating social construction into value co-creation may reveal socially constructed disparities. The paper provides aggregated information on cancer patients’ and relatives’ complaints concerning interpersonal issues, which can increase knowledge about patient healthcare service perceptions.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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